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Dementia

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NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Ryan Flinn, Bloomberg News
The cost of caring for dementia patients has reached $109 billion annually, exceeding that for heart disease and cancer, and will double by the time the youngest baby boomers reach their 70s, according to a study. Dementia is characterized by a group of symptoms that prevent people from carrying out the tasks of daily living. Reduced mental function makes it impossible for them to do things like keep track of medications or finances. In more severe cases, patients lose the ability to handle basic tasks like bathing and dressing.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
For several years, Sylvia Gentry noticed that her husband, Louis, was behaving oddly, but she didn't suspect he might have a brain disease. Their saga began about 10 years ago. He left the table midway through dinner with guests he'd liked for 30 years - they were boring, he told her. One Thanksgiving, he threw an artificial log in the fireplace, still wrapped in plastic. Oddest of all, he began to cross social boundaries. He'd ask embarrassing questions and hug strangers. He became overly flirtatious with young women.
NEWS
August 5, 2010
Police are asking for the public's help in locating an 83-year-old man with dementia who has been missing since Wednesday morning in the Tacony section of the city. David Fleming was last seen in the 6300 block of Gillespie Street around 11 a.m., police said. He is described as 5-foot-11, 180 pounds, with blue eyes and gray hair. He was wearing a black T-shirt with animals on it, jeans shorts, black socks, and white sneakers. Anybody with information is being asked to contact Northeast Detectives at 215-686-3153 or -3154.
SPORTS
August 24, 2011 | By Beth Rucker, Associated Press
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. - Tennessee's Pat Summitt plans to coach "as long as the good Lord is willing" despite recently learning she has early onset dementia. In a statement from Summitt released by the university on Tuesday, the Hall of Fame coach said she visited with doctors at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., after the 2010-11 basketball season ended, and early onset dementia - Alzheimer's type - was diagnosed over the summer. "I plan to continue to be your coach," Summitt said.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Beth Rucker, ASSOCIATED PRESS
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. - Tennessee's Pat Summitt plans to coach "as long as the good Lord is willing" despite recently being diagnosed with early onset dementia. In a statement from Summitt released by the university on Tuesday, the Hall of Fame coach said she visited with doctors at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., after the end of the 2010-11 basketball season ended and was diagnosed with early onset dementia - Alzheimer's type - over the summer. "I plan to continue to be your coach," Summitt said.
NEWS
March 7, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Empathy - the kind where you try to think your way into understanding how others feel - only gets you so far. The leaders of the Watermark at Logan Square, a senior-living high-rise in Philadelphia, recently helped the children of two residents take their empathy to a new level. After just a few minutes of being "garbed" with some low-tech handicapping devices, Richard Abraham, 59, a stock trader who lives in Havertown, and Becky Jones, 53, a Widener University political science professor who lives near the Art Museum, developed a new appreciation for what it's like to be old and have dementia.
SPORTS
October 1, 2009 | By Matt Gelb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mike Ditka says these are the times he thinks most about Mick Tingelhoff, Pete Pihos, Joe Perry, John Mackey, the late Jim Ringo, and dozens of other former NFL players who have suffered from dementia or Alzheimer's. Ditka, long a passionate advocate for the welfare of former NFL players suffering from injuries sustained on the field decades ago, recently read the news of a study commissioned by the NFL. It indicated that memory-related diseases were diagnosed in former players at a rate 19 times the rate for all men aged 30 through 49. The Hall of Fame player, who went on to coach two NFL teams and is now a broadcaster for ESPN, is angry that a study commissioned by the NFL is now being downplayed by a league spokesman and other doctors.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
The prolific Philadelphia playwright Bruce Graham must be leading a charmed life. In a matter of months, The Outgoing Tide, his funny and searing exploration of dementia and its effect on a family, has been given not one but two terrific productions here. The first was in Center City in the spring, at Philadelphia Theatre Company. The second now plays in Wilmington, where Delaware Theatre Company takes The Outgoing Tide - with its perfect narrative arc, smooth writing, and genuine tone - and runs with it in a production directed by Broadway producer Bud Martin, in his first season as artistic director in Wilmington.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charter school founder Dorothy June Brown suffers from Alzheimer's-like dementia and is incompetent to be retried on fraud charges, a federal judge has found. In an order entered Monday, Judge R. Barclay Surrick granted a motion from the U.S. attorney and dismissed the indictment charging that Brown had defrauded the schools she founded of $6.3 million. Defense attorneys concurred. Based on reports of four medical experts, Surrick found that a preponderance of evidence showed that Brown could not stand trial because she "is unable to understand the nature and consequences of the proceedings against her and to assist properly in her defense.
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BUSINESS
August 28, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Fearful that someone is stealing money from your parents or grandparents, or that an elderly loved one may be exploited for financial gain? Emily Cardin was, after her mother began sending money to a man she'd never met in person but with whom she had corresponded on Match.com. That was seven years ago. "My mom lost $60,000 and her home," said Cardin, who lives in King of Prussia. "All of us saw she wasn't acting logically, but she wouldn't believe us. My theory is that she was in the early stages of dementia.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Are you 55 or older? Want to give back to the community, plus earn a $10-an-hour stipend? Then you might want to join the ranks of ReServeInc.org, an organization that pairs nonprofits and public agencies with older professionals, which it calls ReServists. Soon-to-be seniors use their skills, experience, and talents for the greater good. Robert Kennedy, 80, a retired geriatrician, now serves as a team adviser for ReServeInc.org's dementia-care coaching program, commuting from his weekend home in Milford, Pa., to his work for the organization in New York City.
NEWS
August 7, 2016
The National Institute on Aging has extended its funding of the University of Pennsylvania's Alzheimer's disease Core Center with a promise of about $8.8 million over five years. The money will take the center, founded in 1991, to its 30th year. Researchers at the center study Alzheimer's and other dementias, including Parkinson's disease dementia, Lewy Body dementia and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Among other things, the center is known for identifying key proteins such as tau, alpha-synuclein and TDP-43, involved in dementia and for helping to develop biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
The National Institute on Aging has extended its funding of the University of Pennsylvania's Alzheimer's Disease Core Center with a promise of about $8.8 million over five years.The money will take the center, which was founded in 1991, to its 30th year. Researchers at the center study Alzheimer's and other dementias including Parkinson's disease dementia, Lewy Body dementia and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Among other things, the center is known for identifying key proteins involved in dementia and helping to develop biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2016
DEAR ABBY: After two failed marriages, I married a wonderful man whom I love but am not in love with. He recently had a seizure, after which he was diagnosed with moderate dementia. All I see is a long, dark road ahead. We are senior citizens with not a long time left on this Earth. My health is suffering because of this situation. I am extremely depressed, suffer from panic attacks, and have lost any hope of happiness in the future. I am torn between my responsibility to my husband and leaving to try to find some sort of joy in my life.
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
People with type 2 diabetes, the kind you are more likely to get as an adult, are at risk for a host of additional medical problems. Stroke and heart attack. Kidney disease. Blindness. Skin infections. Numbness in the feet. Add one more you and even your doctor may not have heard is connected: dementia. Diabetes at least doubles your risk of developing it. Even diabetics without dementia can have subtle cognitive problems. "Your average diabetologist, internal medicine doctor, they're still not aware of that information," said Luke Stoeckel, a neuropsychologist at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Bill Manzi took a deep breath, and yet another. Breathe-in-the-nose, breathe-out-the-mouth deep breaths. Then he answered his wife Susan's question, the same one she had just asked but had forgotten due to dementia. Susan Strohmetz is in the early stages of the disease. After she was diagnosed last year, Manzi almost immediately enrolled in a six-week-long caregiver class at the Penn Memory Center, where she is being treated ( www.philly.com/memory ). Strohmetz, now 70 and retired, was diagnosed in 2014 with mild cognitive impairment.
NEWS
June 26, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
DEAR ABBY: I have a good friend I have traveled with for many years. The last few years she has been showing increasing signs of confusion and forgetfulness. She has difficulty managing her paperwork for travel and remembering what our plans are for the next day. On the most recent trip, she picked up other people's coats and insisted they were hers. My attempts to discuss this with her only made things worse and led to her accusing me of destroying her confidence. I believe this is the onset of dementia.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
There are some promising drugs in the Alzheimer's pipeline, but a panel of experts asked to predict the potential financial impact of new treatments was not optimistic that a cure is imminent. Roy Beveridge, an oncologist who is chief medical officer for the insurer Humana, told a group of actuaries this week in Philadelphia that he expected to see cancer cures before drug developers figure out how to stop dementia. "We're not spending preparatory time around that," he said when asked how an Alzheimer's cure would affect the company.
NEWS
May 1, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Ferrell won't play Reagan Will Ferrell on Friday said he would not star as Ronald Reagan in a forthcoming satire that portrays the 40th president leading the country while suffering from dementia. Reagan died of Alzheimer's in 2004. The film is about an intern who helps Reagan by convincing him he's playing the leader of the free world in a movie. The Alzheimer's Association said using "dementia as a comedic device is offensive. " Reagan's daughter Patti Davis posted an open letter to Ferrell.
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