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Dementia

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NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Ryan Flinn, Bloomberg News
The cost of caring for dementia patients has reached $109 billion annually, exceeding that for heart disease and cancer, and will double by the time the youngest baby boomers reach their 70s, according to a study. Dementia is characterized by a group of symptoms that prevent people from carrying out the tasks of daily living. Reduced mental function makes it impossible for them to do things like keep track of medications or finances. In more severe cases, patients lose the ability to handle basic tasks like bathing and dressing.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
For several years, Sylvia Gentry noticed that her husband, Louis, was behaving oddly, but she didn't suspect he might have a brain disease. Their saga began about 10 years ago. He left the table midway through dinner with guests he'd liked for 30 years - they were boring, he told her. One Thanksgiving, he threw an artificial log in the fireplace, still wrapped in plastic. Oddest of all, he began to cross social boundaries. He'd ask embarrassing questions and hug strangers. He became overly flirtatious with young women.
NEWS
March 7, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Empathy - the kind where you try to think your way into understanding how others feel - only gets you so far. The leaders of the Watermark at Logan Square, a senior-living high-rise in Philadelphia, recently helped the children of two residents take their empathy to a new level. After just a few minutes of being "garbed" with some low-tech handicapping devices, Richard Abraham, 59, a stock trader who lives in Havertown, and Becky Jones, 53, a Widener University political science professor who lives near the Art Museum, developed a new appreciation for what it's like to be old and have dementia.
NEWS
August 5, 2010
Police are asking for the public's help in locating an 83-year-old man with dementia who has been missing since Wednesday morning in the Tacony section of the city. David Fleming was last seen in the 6300 block of Gillespie Street around 11 a.m., police said. He is described as 5-foot-11, 180 pounds, with blue eyes and gray hair. He was wearing a black T-shirt with animals on it, jeans shorts, black socks, and white sneakers. Anybody with information is being asked to contact Northeast Detectives at 215-686-3153 or -3154.
SPORTS
August 24, 2011 | By Beth Rucker, Associated Press
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. - Tennessee's Pat Summitt plans to coach "as long as the good Lord is willing" despite recently learning she has early onset dementia. In a statement from Summitt released by the university on Tuesday, the Hall of Fame coach said she visited with doctors at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., after the 2010-11 basketball season ended, and early onset dementia - Alzheimer's type - was diagnosed over the summer. "I plan to continue to be your coach," Summitt said.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Beth Rucker, ASSOCIATED PRESS
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. - Tennessee's Pat Summitt plans to coach "as long as the good Lord is willing" despite recently being diagnosed with early onset dementia. In a statement from Summitt released by the university on Tuesday, the Hall of Fame coach said she visited with doctors at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., after the end of the 2010-11 basketball season ended and was diagnosed with early onset dementia - Alzheimer's type - over the summer. "I plan to continue to be your coach," Summitt said.
SPORTS
October 1, 2009 | By Matt Gelb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mike Ditka says these are the times he thinks most about Mick Tingelhoff, Pete Pihos, Joe Perry, John Mackey, the late Jim Ringo, and dozens of other former NFL players who have suffered from dementia or Alzheimer's. Ditka, long a passionate advocate for the welfare of former NFL players suffering from injuries sustained on the field decades ago, recently read the news of a study commissioned by the NFL. It indicated that memory-related diseases were diagnosed in former players at a rate 19 times the rate for all men aged 30 through 49. The Hall of Fame player, who went on to coach two NFL teams and is now a broadcaster for ESPN, is angry that a study commissioned by the NFL is now being downplayed by a league spokesman and other doctors.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
The prolific Philadelphia playwright Bruce Graham must be leading a charmed life. In a matter of months, The Outgoing Tide, his funny and searing exploration of dementia and its effect on a family, has been given not one but two terrific productions here. The first was in Center City in the spring, at Philadelphia Theatre Company. The second now plays in Wilmington, where Delaware Theatre Company takes The Outgoing Tide - with its perfect narrative arc, smooth writing, and genuine tone - and runs with it in a production directed by Broadway producer Bud Martin, in his first season as artistic director in Wilmington.
SPORTS
February 3, 2012 | By Donna Spencer, CANADIAN PRESS
At 83, Mr. Hockey is still in demand and on the move. Gordie Howe is about to embark on another series of fund-raisers to support dementia research. It's a personal cause. The disease killed his wife, Colleen, in 2009 and is beginning to affect him. "He's a little bit worse than last year, but pretty close to about the same," son Marty said. "He just loses a little bit more, grasping for words. "The worst part of this disease is there's nothing you can do about it. " While the long-term effects of concussions have been very much in the news lately, the family is hesitant to link the Hall of Famer's condition to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers for Dorothy June Brown, a charter school founder scheduled to be retried next month on federal fraud charges, have filed new medical reports that they say bolster their contention that the 77-year-old educator has dementia. Lawyers said in court documents that they are not seeking to delay Brown's retrial, scheduled to begin July 7 with jury selection on June 29. Instead, they have asked the judge to evaluate Brown's mental competency "at every stage at which it is raised" because physicians at the Cleveland Clinic have concluded that Brown has Alzheimer's-type dementia.
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first clue that something was wrong with his grandmother came when Bill Mikus walked with her to a restaurant in Reading that she often visited. "You want your regular?" the waitress asked. It turned out the regular was just coffee. "She doesn't come here to eat?" Mikus asked the waitress, flabbergasted. He took some time off work to investigate. His grandmother, who had helped raise him after his mother died, was then in her mid-80s and lived alone. Her refrigerator was nearly empty.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is not surprising when older people with dementia make poor financial decisions or are fleeced by con artists. But even "normal" brain aging, which causes changes in cognitive and social abilities, can make people vulnerable later in life to financial disaster. A conference at the University of Pennsylvania this week tackled how to figure out whether older people are capable of good decision-making, and what can be done to protect elders from fraud and abuse. Sponsored by Penn's Institute on Aging and Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, the event drew people from academia, law enforcement, and social services.
NEWS
March 7, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Empathy - the kind where you try to think your way into understanding how others feel - only gets you so far. The leaders of the Watermark at Logan Square, a senior-living high-rise in Philadelphia, recently helped the children of two residents take their empathy to a new level. After just a few minutes of being "garbed" with some low-tech handicapping devices, Richard Abraham, 59, a stock trader who lives in Havertown, and Becky Jones, 53, a Widener University political science professor who lives near the Art Museum, developed a new appreciation for what it's like to be old and have dementia.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Bitros has a lovely life. She lives in a beautiful restored barn in Langhorne, dates a kind man, sees her grandchildren twice a week. She woke up on a recent Monday and found her frying pan in her refrigerator. She has no idea when or why she put it there. Bitros, 64, is a former hospice nurse and educator who has seen many people with dementia die. She was so concerned about her own memory losses - entire blocks of time vanished, what she called intermittent amnesia - that she had herself tested by three neurologists: brain scans, a spinal tap, the full workup.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
John B. "Jack" Hagner, 83, of Bala Cynwyd, a longtime public accountant, died Monday, Oct. 20, of dementia at Symphony Square Assisted Living & Memory Care. His wife of 27 years, Mary Ellen Yuhas Hagner, said Mr. Hagner started suffering memory loss in 2011 and was diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia. In 2013, he was admitted to Symphony Square. Mr. Hagner worked as a public accountant for 41 years at Ratke, Miller, Hagner & Co. in Philadelphia. It was formerly known as Hagner & Co. after his grandfather and father, who founded the company during the 1930s.
NEWS
August 5, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Through a work of art, the two women were hoping to save a connection that is slipping away. Their husbands, who have Alzheimer's disease, are becoming more distant, their marriages more solitary and fraught with worry. But in a discussion of a painting called The Immigrants , those husbands - Jack Williams and Dick Force - virtually carried the conversation at the Woodmere Art Museum, in Chestnut Hill. The two men, whose wives had met through their mutual experience as caregivers, found the story in the brushstrokes and shared their thoughts about the discovery.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
For several years, Sylvia Gentry noticed that her husband, Louis, was behaving oddly, but she didn't suspect he might have a brain disease. Their saga began about 10 years ago. He left the table midway through dinner with guests he'd liked for 30 years - they were boring, he told her. One Thanksgiving, he threw an artificial log in the fireplace, still wrapped in plastic. Oddest of all, he began to cross social boundaries. He'd ask embarrassing questions and hug strangers. He became overly flirtatious with young women.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can antidepressants help ward off Alzheimer's disease? That's the tantalizing question raised by new research from a University of Pennsylvania psychiatrist. She's says it's way too early to answer it. "I am not advocating that people take [antidepressants] at this point in time for anything other than depression," said Yvette Sheline, a professor of psychiatry, radiology, and neurology and director of the Center for Neuromodulation in Depression and Stress. Her latest work explored the link between amyloid beta, one of the hallmark proteins in Alzheimer's disease, and the antidepressant citalopram (Celexa)
NEWS
April 16, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dementia is terrible for everyone, but elderly people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) face extra problems, says Ed Bomba, communications chair for the LGBT Elder Initiative in Philadelphia. Many have spent much of their lives in the closet and fear discrimination by medical or social service providers or even the people they might live with in nursing homes. "We don't have children, as a rule. We don't have partners, as a rule, as we age," Bomba said. Many older LGBT people were rejected by their families and have created support systems of friends.
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