CollectionsDemocracy
IN THE NEWS

Democracy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 4, 2008 | Inquirer photographs by Tom Gralish
A one-room schoolhouse in Madison County, Iowa (of "Bridges of ... " fame), was where the Democrats of Lee and Jefferson Townships, most of them farmers, made their choices for presidential candidate known when they caucused from 7 to 8 p.m. yesterday. philly.com See more of Tom Gralish?s photography from Iowa, and from around our region, at http://go.philly.com/caucus For Tom Gralish?s photo blog, visit http://blogs.phillynews.com/inquirer/sceneonroad
NEWS
January 6, 2006
AS LONG as we have lawyers, judges and professors like Perry A. Zirkel (op-ed, "Dover decision smart design," Jan. 3), the legal mumbo jumbo will continue ad nauseam. As Professor Zirkel pointed out, the Epperson v. Arkansas decision in 1968 started a consistent line of decisions on intelligent design, and we haven't seen the end yet. What he failed to mention was that the people of Dover with one simple democratic action should have settled it. The Dover voters threw out the school board and intelligent design with it. That's democracy in action - not the fiasco of a trial that followed.
NEWS
December 28, 2004
If the results of Sunday's runoff presidential election in Ukraine hold, then that nation's people will have moved away from Russian authoritarianism and closer to Western policies. With most of the votes counted, West-leaning opposition candidate Viktor Yushchenko has won by a comfortable margin. The runup to the runoff was marked by his supporters staging huge protests against fraud in a previous election, which pro-Russian Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych dubiously won. Democracy's uglier side showed in the fraud that occurred in the Nov. 21 balloting, which the Ukrainian Supreme Court annulled.
NEWS
November 17, 2003
I'M NOT sure what union hall or Third World nation letter-writer Charles Murphy's version of "democracy in action" hails from, but I beg to differ. It's been a while since my last political-science course, but events such as a misfiring Molotov cocktail, stalking and harassing a candidate's wife and attacking volunteers with a 2-by-4 don't sound like democracy to me. And as far as "visiting" fans deserving what they get for holding a pep rally - here's a news flash: Philadelphia residents are the "home" team.
NEWS
April 8, 2005 | By Abdul Aziz Said and Nathan C. Funk
Abdul Aziz Said is professor of international peace and conflict resolution at American University Nathan C. Funk is assistant professor of peace and conflict studies at Conrad Grebel University College, the University of Waterloo, Canada Pundits suggest that the proliferation of elections and popular protests in the Middle East means that democracy is on the verge of a dramatic victory there. This may strike most Middle Eastern readers as wishful thinking, especially in light of the apathy of Arab leaders and their obstinacy to change, as evidenced in last week's Arab League summit conference.
NEWS
March 16, 2006 | By Abdul Aziz Said and Ben Jensen
Are democracy and Islam incompatible? From the growing tide of sectarian violence in Iraq to Hamas' victory in Palestinian elections, many are pessimistic about the possibility of an Islamic democracy. Yet to assume that these events are indicative of some kind of latent incommensurability is specious reasoning at best. Not only are democracy and Islam compatible, the combination may prove the only exit route for a clash of civilizations. First, the premise of incompatibility rests upon a faulty assumption of a magical "democratic cocktail": rising wages, an active civil society, and secularization.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter. - Unknown That comment, often wrongly attributed to Winston Churchill, sums up quite a few responses when an elected school board is suggested for Philadelphia. That's understandable. One need spend only a few minutes thinking about the boss-driven, corruption-generating political system that democracy has produced in this city to decide it doesn't need any more of that. But such pessimism suggests that Philadelphians are incapable of what people in other cities and towns across America are doing, which is finding a way to maneuver through their own political cesspools to provide for the education of their children.
NEWS
June 25, 2013
By Tia O'Brien ISTANBUL, Turkey - The violent drama playing out in fits and starts on the streets of Istanbul - and across the country - is more than a distant news headline for me. It's a personal story come full circle. On Dec. 4, 1945, a government-inspired mob of 10,000 wound their way through Istanbul's cobblestone streets, swinging pick axes and sledgehammers. Their mission was to silence my grandparents, owners of Turkey's second-largest newspaper. In broad daylight as the police watched, they destroyed Zekeriya and Sabiha Sertel's publishing house, knocking down the door, breaking apart printing presses, and heaving rolls of printing paper into the streets.
NEWS
November 21, 2007
AS A REPUBLICAN, the election was very embarrassing. Our nominee, Al Taubenberger, was crushed by Democrat Michael Nutter, who beat Taubenberger so badly (83 percent to 17) that the margin made city history! We didn't just lose. We got clobbered. Mr. Taubenberger's weak campaign was not just a loss for the party. Democracy suffered as well. For our system to work, we need competitive elections with both major points of view presented. And because Mr. Taubenberger ran such an awful race, some people are going to think Republicans can never win a citywide race.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 16, 2016 | By Christine Flowers
WHEN GARY JOHNSON had his Aleppo moment a week ago, I was among those who could not believe his absolute incompetence. I understand that Libertarians generally take an isolationist position when it comes to foreign affairs (now, all the offended Libertarians are going to flood my inbox with insulting comments along the lines of "Aleppo this, you harridan"), but it was incredibly troubling to see someone who thought he was fit to lead this country show such a lack of interest, of inquisitiveness, of recognition that, as John Donne wrote, "No man is an island, entire of itself.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Gar Joseph, For the Daily News
AH, DEMOCRACY! It ranges from enlightenment and open-mindedness to paranoia and hatred. What can we expect over the next two weeks, with the Republican National Convention in Cleveland followed by the Democratic National Convention here? If history foretells, both the best and the worst. At each convention. Historic reporter H.L. Mencken once described it like this: "A national convention is as fascinating as a revival or a hanging. It is vulgar, ugly, stupid and tedious, to be sure, and yet there suddenly comes a show so gaudy and hilarious, so melodramatic and obscene, so unimaginably exhilarating and preposterous that one lives a gorgeous year in an hour.
NEWS
July 13, 2016
By George Kohl The vision of our founders was of a government of, by, and for the people. And history tells the story of how our democracy has grown, from the days when only white, male property owners had rights to embracing African Americans and women as full voting participants. Today there's an extreme attack on our democracy, one that threatens to transform the government into one of, by, and for corporations and the 1 percent. Too many Americans believe the system is rigged, that politicians don't listen to the people.
NEWS
July 13, 2016
By Rebecca Burgess Writing democracy's obituary has a history about as long as democracy's own life span. The 2016 diagnosis includes some now-familiar maladies: legislative gridlock or stagnation, hyperpartisan divides, and the capture of the halls of government by privileged special interests, whose fistfuls of dollars effectively mute the political voice of the average American. Under such circumstances, the report goes, democracy flatlines. But democracy isn't dead - it's quite alive, and its reactionary kicking against aspects of our modern administrative state explains a great deal about current levels of gridlock and partisanship.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Launched in February 1996, Democracy Now! was born of a unique idea: an hour-long daily syndicated public radio news show focused entirely on the presidential election. Hosted by veteran journalist Amy Goodman, the show aired on five stations and was supposed to go dark after Election Day. Twenty years have passed and Democracy Now! still airs every day. Of course, it's grown a bit: Today, it's carried by 1,400 radio and TV stations around the world and is available online at www.democracynow.org . (Locally, it's available on several stations and is also carried by DirecTV, Dish Network, Verizon Fios, and Comcast.)
NEWS
May 22, 2016
Amy Goodman: "Democracy Now!" Noon on Monday at the Free Library, 1901 Vine St. Admission: Free. Information: 215-686-5322 or www.freelibrary.org . For a list of stations that televise the show "Democracy Now!" visit www.democracynow.org .
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
The greatest threat to American security is something most Americans never think of. President Obama touched on it in his speech to the European people on Monday in Germany. I'm not referring to ISIS, although Obama called the terrorist group "the most urgent threat to our nations" in his remarks. I'm talking about a more existential threat to Europe (and America): a diminishing faith in democracy as a political system. On the continent, this is manifested by the widening cracks in the European Union and the rise of radical right-wing parties.
NEWS
April 21, 2016 | By Will Bunch, Daily News Columnist
NEW YORK'S long-awaited primary had two big winners Tuesday night, the GOP's Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton, but literally millions of losers - as huge swaths of the electorate were disenfranchised by the state's arcane voting rules and then by an inexplicable, massive purge of voting rolls in New York City. A night that was supposed to bring clarity to one of the most divisive presidential campaigns in decades instead became an embarrassing, muddled nightmare for American democracy, as horror stories mounted from polling places all over the nation's largest city.
NEWS
April 21, 2016
By Carl Dranoff Philadelphia has gained its rightful place as a national model of urban renewal, and the proof is all around us. It is in our skyline punctuated by Liberty Place and the Comcast Center. It's along corridors such as the Avenue of the Arts, one of the most successful catalysts for economic growth in the United States. It winds through the Schuylkill River Trail, voted the best urban trail in America. And it's in the $6.7 billion of new development underway throughout the city.
NEWS
March 24, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Anti-Trump protests attack free speech It is clear that the purpose of the so-called demonstrators at Donald Trump's rallies is not to protest but to disrupt and prevent those rallies ("Condemn the thuggery of both sides," Monday). It is also obvious that the disruption is part of a well-organized campaign. Yet the press and many others blame Trump for the confrontations. In a truly free country, I should be able to hear whomever I want without disruptive individuals trying to dictate my rights.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|