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Democratic National Convention

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NEWS
August 13, 2000 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One thing Ted Hayes can do without is a bunch of spoiled white kids with credit cards messing with his convention. The National Homeless Convention, that is. "I'm going to tell those little punks to leave while you can before you get spanked," said Hayes, who is an advocate for the homeless. Hayes, 49, a tall, slender, bearded black man with big eyes and shoulder-length graying dreadlocks, will launch his convention of homeless people tomorrow - the same day the Democrats launch their convention at the Staples Center, three blocks from Hayes' quarters at Dome Village, a transitional housing colony just off a freeway.
NEWS
May 28, 2010
Philadelphia isn't interested in having the Democratic National Convention here in 2012 but is pondering a bid in 2016. Mayor Nutter recently told Democratic National Committee Chairman Tim Kaine that the high costs of holding a convention, including police overtime, precluded a bid for the next big Democratic get-together. "Our analysis suggests the costs associated with preparing for and hosting the 2012 DNC are important not to overlook," Nutter wrote to Kaine. He also said he wanted to "commit to being first in line to bid on the 2016 Democratic National Convention.
NEWS
August 16, 2012
A story Wednesday on party convention keynote speakers wrongly described Bill Clinton's speech at the 1988 Democratic National Convention; it was a nominating speech. It also wrongly described the position President Obama held at the time of his 2004 keynote speech; he was a state senator in Illinois. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357)
NEWS
July 16, 2004 | By Shannon McCaffrey INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge misspoke when he said the costs of securing the Democratic National Convention in Boston could surpass those for the 2002 Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, a spokesman said yesterday. Brian Roehrkasse said the cost of the convention would fall below the $320 million spent protecting the 2002 Olympics. He could not provide an estimate of the cost of the convention, which runs from July 26-29. At a news conference Wednesday in Boston, Ridge said the cost for securing the convention "will be as high or even higher" than the Olympic Games.
NEWS
July 17, 1988 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Convention Bureau
Forget about learning the difference between the Credentials Committee and the Rules Committee. Most of the delegates don't, so why should you? Here's the glossary you need to enhance your viewing enjoyment of the Democratic National Convention. PLATFORM. No, not the one nobody reads. Keep an eye on the one in the convention hall. There's a section behind the podium that is electronically raised and lowered so every speaker appears to be the same height on camera. Try to catch it going up for 5-foot, 8-inch Michael S. Dukakis.
NEWS
March 7, 2002
Let's be frank for a moment. It might be nice if Philadelphia hosted the 2004 Democratic National Convention. But the Dems would have to spend mighty liberally if they came here, because with its financial woes and urban wounds, the city simply cannot afford wooing and holding a convention in the near future. The city had to raise $66 million in 2000 for the GOP convention, largely with the help of potent former Gov. Tom Ridge. His successor, lame duck Gov. Schweiker, is preoccupied with a state debt and a promise of $75 million for Philadelphia schools.
NEWS
July 20, 1992 | From the New York Times
On the occasion of the Democratic National Convention, the editors of Harper's Magazine compiled a special index to take the measure of the political moment. Excerpts follow: Number of extra dancers Stringfellow's, a New York City topless bar, hired to work during the Democratic National Convention: 30. Number of extra dancers that Rick's, a Houston topless bar, plans to hire during the Republican National Convention next month: 20. Percentage points by which Houston's humidity level in August exceeds New York's in July, according to the Democratic National Committee's convention press kit: 16. Ratio of reporters to delegates attending the Democratic convention this year: 3 to 1. Number of first-time voters registered in the last year through concert and MTV promotions by Rock the Vote: 100,000.
NEWS
July 27, 2004 | By Maria Laboy
When I was growing up, I remember watching the national political conventions on television. I remember thinking how exciting it all seemed. The people, the music, the laughter and shouts of joy. The beautiful red, white and blue streamers, balloons and decorations, and seeing all the smiling faces. Then there were the speeches. Although I didn't pay much attention to them at the time, I remember thinking: "Wow! All those people are really excited and all that hoopla for just two people, the presidential and vice presidential nominees!"
NEWS
July 18, 1988 | By BARBARA BECK, Daily News Staff Writer
The Democratic National Convention is this week, and Channels 3, 6 and 10 will be there. While the networks have eight or nine hours of prime time convention coverage scheduled today through Thursday, the local news teams plan to buttonhole delegates from Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware to liven up their regular newscasts. Channel 3 (KYW): Jack Jones anchors special live reports from the Omni Center in Atlanta on the 5:30, 6 and 11 p.m. editions of "Eyewitness News. " Correspondent-at-large Dick Sheeran and political editor Tia O'Brien join him with interviews and anaylsis of the personalities and issues.
NEWS
January 14, 2010 | By Miriam Hill and Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Could Philadelphia be home to the Democratic National Convention in 2012? The city's civic and business leaders are cautiously exploring a proposal to bring the Democrats' next big show here. U.S. Rep. Bob Brady is pushing the idea, but other leaders are more tentative. "We can get a lot of good publicity for the city of Philadelphia and make our citizens proud, as usual," Brady said. Mayor Nutter called it an "honor for our city to be considered," but said he was concerned that the recession and the city's budget crisis make for bad timing.
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NEWS
November 18, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
It took less than an hour, and Murat Guzel was persuaded to break out his checkbook. With his signature, the Bethlehem, Pa., purveyor of organic foods put up $100,000 to try to bring the Democratic National Convention to Philadelphia in 2016. "We need to remember our founding fathers and our nation's founding principles, and Philadelphia is the best place for that," said Guzel, a frequent donor to Democratic campaigns. "Those principles need to be remembered. I think this is the best time in many years to send the message about those values across the United States and the international community.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Chris Brennan
I N A POLITICAL tug-of-war, with U.S. Rep. Bob Brady and City Council on one end of the rope and Mayor Nutter on the other, guess who usually gets dragged across the line? There were skid marks behind Nutter yesterday after another bout of City Hall dysfunction, this time about whether Philadelphia should officially express interest in hosting the 2016 Democratic National Convention. U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz , chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, sent letters to several cities on Feb. 7, initiating the "very first step" in the 2016 convention process.
NEWS
August 7, 2013 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
THE DEMOCRATIC National Committee will ask cities next month if they are interested in hosting the party's 2016 convention. U.S. Rep. Bob Brady has his answer. Tomorrow, the city's Democratic Party chairman will make his case for a convention bid to political, tourism and labor leaders from the region. To do so, Brady is bringing to Philly the team that produced the 2012 convention in Charlotte, N.C. They will explain the complicated process of winning the bid. For Brady, it will be a trip through what might have been.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
BRIGANTINE, N.J. - Maybe in their wildest dream, a fantasy fueled by 114 years of losing elections to Republicans, the Democrats of Brigantine - yes, there are some! - imagined a savior. Someone who would appear on their narrow barrier island in the shadow of Atlantic City, the place the kids call Narnia - one way in, one way out - and the pols call the sanctum sanctorum , the sacred center of the Atlantic County Republican Empire, the last vestige of the backslapping/stabbing reign of a guy named Nucky Johnson.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHARLOTTE - The speaking gig was already a big deal for Mayor Nutter: an evening slot on the rostrum of the Democratic National Convention. Some of the mayor's big-name Democratic compatriots, like New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, aren't speaking at all, while others, like Newark Mayor Cory Booker, were assigned earlier, less-visible times. "I was already excited," Nutter said in an interview Wednesday afternoon. Excited, that is, before he got a call this week from President Obama's campaign.
NEWS
September 7, 2012
PHILADELPHIA was a front-runner to host the Democratic National Convention this year, but Mayor Nutter , concerned about the city's budget troubles, dragged his feet in 2010 and then declined to bid for the event. Nutter is now cautiously optimistic about holding a Democratic convention in Philly in 2016. He dodged when asked on MSNBC Thursday morning to speculate about presidential candidates four years from now. Instead, Nutter offered: "Well, when you want to talk about 2016, you might want to think about Philadelphia, 2016, DNC. " Nutter, fresh from the stage after a convention speech Thursday night, said that applications for the next convention won't be submitted until 2014.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
CHARLOTTE - The blue-tinted plastic water bottles handed out as gifts at Tuesday's lunch honoring the women of the Pennsylvania delegation to the Democratic National Convention seemed to be hinting at something. The bottles bore the name Allyson Schwartz , surrounded by stars. There was no mention of an office or an election year in the logo. Schwartz, of course, is a member of the U.S. House, representing the 13th District in Montgomery County and Northeast Philadelphia, but persistent political buzz has her aiming to run statewide, for either governor in 2014 or U.S. Senate in 2016.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
With President Obama making his way to the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte this week to accept his party's nomination for a second term, few other places on Earth are swarming with as much security per square foot. But that hasn't deterred Mayor Nutter from taking three Philadelphia police officers to Charlotte for his own security detail, along with two civilian aides - Lauren Walker, a $65,000-a-year special assistant who will accompany the mayor to virtually every event on a crowded convention schedule, and Tumar Alexander, a $118,000-a-year deputy chief of staff and the mayor's top liaison to the U.S. Conference of Mayors.
NEWS
September 5, 2012
Former Gov. Ed Rendell will be reporting for us this week from the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte. DESPITE THE FACT that the convention doesn't start until Tuesday, almost all the Democrats - delegates, donors and supporters - arrived on Sunday or Monday. On the night before the convention starts, each state has a welcome party for their delegation. Political talk dominates at these affairs, but there was considerable Steelers-Eagles talk at our party as well.
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