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NEWS
November 10, 2002 | By Larry Eichel
To give you an idea of how desperate the Democrats are post-election, a number of party strategists have expressed a longing for the days of Bill Clinton. The fellow they miss is not the one who messed around with Monica Lewinsky and put the nation through the agony of impeachment. Or the one who used the Lincoln Bedroom as his private fund-raising tool. Or whose campaign efforts this fall didn't amount to much. No, the Bill Clinton they remember fondly is the candidate who got elected twice as a New Democrat, sounding as if he had some fresh ideas.
NEWS
June 10, 1990 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
The primary elections in Camden County last week were not exactly a textbook case of true democracy at work. After all, fewer than one-seventh of the eligible voters went to the polls. But the contested Democratic primary did provide two lessons about the workings of Camden County's long-dominant Democratic Party. For one, the Democratic organization proved that personalities can come and go but the party persists. Four of the seven seats at the freeholder table stay warm with Democratic bodies; only the nameplates change.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | By Katharine Seelye, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the wake of the Democrats' statewide debacle at the ballot box last month, party officials yesterday announced a plan to give themselves more control in the campaign process. Foremost among the changes, said state party Chairman Larry Yatch, is that from now on the party - not the governor - will decide which candidates to endorse in future statewide elections. The party's next endorsements will come at its March 11 meeting, when it picks candidates to run in the May 16 primary.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - "Police investigate break-in at Democratic Party headquarters. " For those of a certain age that headline may sound familiar. Only this time, almost 40 years after GOP operatives burglarized the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Watergate complex in Washington, the target was Pennsylvania state Democratic Party headquarters in Harrisburg. City police say on July 11, party officials reported someone had entered their eighth-floor downtown Harrisburg offices overnight and removed two laptops and a camcorder.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Burn, chairman of the state Democratic Party, may be on his way out and Gov. Wolf apparently already has his successor in mind - Montgomery County Democratic Chairman Marcel Groen. Burn, an attorney from Allegheny County, said in an interview Saturday that he told party regional caucus leaders in a meeting in Allentown on Friday that he was considering resigning the post he has held since 2010. That news comes five months before the Nov. 3 general election, which includes Democrats running statewide for seats on the state's Supreme Court, Superior Court, and Commonwealth Court.
NEWS
September 22, 2002 | By Steven Thomma INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When it comes to war with Iraq, this is not your father's Democratic Party. At least not if your father protested the war in Vietnam, voted for peace candidate George McGovern, or thought Michael Dukakis looked good in that tank. The coming vote in Congress on war with Iraq is revealing a new Democratic Party, one desperate to shed the antiwar, antimilitary reflex that defined it from Vietnam through the Persian Gulf war. First popularized by challenges to President Lyndon Johnson in 1968 over Vietnam, antiwar and antimilitary sentiments prevailed in the party for a quarter-century.
NEWS
August 25, 1989 | By Michael L. Rozansky and Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Buck Scott, the homespun chairman of the Montgomery County Democratic Committee, will step down within the next few months, acknowledging that the party needs a leader with more time and commitment. Scott, a two-term party leader whose re-election a year ago surprised even himself, told Democratic officials last week that his resignation would take effect when the 54-member executive committee chooses a successor, probably after the November elections. "I felt the committee needed a leader who could give it more time and effort than what I'm in a position to give," said Scott, 60, a Wynnewood resident, who runs Electrical Energy Enterprises Inc. in Narberth.
NEWS
May 12, 1986 | By S.A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
If everything were going right, 1986 would still be a year when Burlington County Democrats would have a lot to worry about. They face another election year against the high profile and high finances of the county Republican Party. But everything is not going right. In the last few days, leaders of the county Democratic Party have been fighting more with one another than getting ready to attack the entrenched GOP. It all started when Sheriff Francis P. "Luke" Brennan, who will retire in November after 27 years in office, said last week he wanted to be chairman of the county Democratic committee.
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NEWS
May 18, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
On any given day, about 700 people are living unsheltered in the streets, train stations, or covered alcoves of Philadelphia. Most stake out space in four Center City locations where the city now wants to focus a new outreach program to connect people with services they need. The city's Office of Supportive Housing on Monday announced details of a new homeless outreach strategy targeting Rittenhouse Square and the areas around the Avenue of the Arts, the Convention Center, and Independence Hall during the morning and evening commutes and lunchtime.
NEWS
May 17, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
NEWS FLASH: Bernie Sanders is likely to lose the Democratic nomination for president. As disappointing as that outcome would be for his ardent supporters, the Vermont senator already can claim a win. His challenge to front-runner Hillary Clinton has defined the issue agenda for the party, forcing her to move left. His success shows the pendulum is swinging away from the pro-corporate centrism that has been national Democrats' dominant ideology for nearly 30 years. Sanders has won 19 states and more than 9 million votes by railing against global free-trade pacts, calling for the breakup of big banks, and advocating for free public college tuition and single-payer health care.
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By T.J. Rooney and Alan Novak
Currents political commentators T.J. Rooney and Alan Novak discuss whether presumptive nominees Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton can unite their respective parties and build campaigns that produce coattails that benefit other candidates. T.J. Rooney is a former chairman of the Pennsylvania Democratic Party Alan Novak is a former chairman of the Republican Party of Pennsylvania R ooney: It is clear after Indiana that Sen. Bernie Sanders intends to continue to campaign and, as he says, take his candidacy and delegates to the convention.
NEWS
May 5, 2016
By Craig Snyder A movement arises within and surrounding a major American political party, a movement that rejects and condemns the official and unofficial establishment of that party's leadership. The party "establishment" is vilified as corrupt and corrupting. National leaders in the party, at both the presidential and congressional level, have to fear first, maybe even mostly, their primary elections. They can afford less and less to position themselves for the broad American political center because they must survive ideological purity contests in primaries within their party.
NEWS
April 27, 2016
Republicans are a more ideological party than Democrats, but ideology has mattered less in the GOP primaries this year than in the race between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. Clinton is in a nearly unassailable position to win her party's nomination. But assuming she prevails, her primary fight with Sanders has underscored weaknesses she will have to deal with to win in November. And Donald Trump's move toward moderation on social issues last week reflects not only his campaign's understanding that he cannot win as a far-right candidate, but also his need to tread carefully to maintain the crazy-quilt coalition he has built in the GOP primaries.
NEWS
April 21, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Get a kick out of this: 57 painted fiberglass donkeys are coming to town. The Democratic National Convention's host committee announced Tuesday that the painted donkeys - representing the 50 states, five U.S. territories, the District of Columbia, and Democrats abroad - will be scattered across Center City to drum up excitement for the convention and draw tourists to different parts of town. "It did come out of my fertile and overactive mind, but it had some rational basis," said former Gov. Ed Rendell, chair of the host committee, at a news conference announcing the donkeys.
NEWS
April 11, 2016
ISSUE | ENERGY Pipelines mean jobs "A Pipeline for Growth," a report by the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, is a practical blueprint for natural-gas infrastructure development that will ensure Pennsylvania's economic future. The report outlines the economic benefits of creating infrastructure to brand Philadelphia as the next global energy hub. Building pipelines to transport natural gas and natural-gas liquids will: Spur an energy and manufacturing boom benefiting the regional economy.
NEWS
March 16, 2016
ISSUE | PATRONAGE Brady should heed the bar When it comes to determining who will become a local judge, U.S. Rep. Robert Brady has more power than anyone else in Philadelphia. How ironic that he is shifting blame to District Attorney Seth Williams for the Democratic Party's support of a judicial candidate, Scott DiClaudio, who was publicly disciplined for incompetent and unethical conduct as a criminal defense lawyer ("Judge receives a public rebuke," Thursday). The Philadelphia Bar Association has repeatedly requested that the Democratic Party endorse only judicial candidates who are "recommended" following its independent and thorough investigation process.
NEWS
January 23, 2016
ISSUE | PHILADELPHIA PAYROLL Clark's pay misused Philadelphia schools go begging to taxpayers for funds to operate while Anthony Clark, chairman of the City Commissioners, is paid $138,612 a year for a low-show job. When he retires, he'll collect more than $10,000 a month in benefits plus a lump-sum payout of about $500,000 from the Deferred Retirement Option Plan. Can you imagine what else goes on in this city? No wonder the schools have no money. |Arnold Einfalt, Voorhees Blame it on Brady U.S. Rep. Robert Brady, longtime chairman of the Democratic Party in Philadelphia, has asked Anthony Clark, chairman of the City Commissioners, to "just resign as chairman and show up" for work ("Brady: Clark a 'disgrace,' " Thursday)
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