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Demolition

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NEWS
January 17, 2016 | Staff Report
Philadelphia police were looking Friday for a man who, posing as a Department of Licenses and Inspections employee, has been telling residents in North Philadelphia that the city was going to demolish their homes. The incidents occurred Jan. 8 and Wednesday on the 2500 block of North Colorado Street, the 2400 block of West Cumberland Street, and the 2400 block of West Sergeant Street, the Mayor's Office of Communications said in a statement. The man wore a reflective vest and yellow hard hat, but presented no identification.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | By Cynthia Henry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Residents determined to save Ardmore Junior High from ruins have vowed to fight on despite a Commonwealth Court decision upholding the demolition. Attorney Alan Candor, representing four Lower Merion residents, said Tuesday that he would file an appeal of the June 18 ruling by today's deadline. Meanwhile, the school district is trying to move ahead with the demolition, which now may cost more than the $1.5 million budgeted last year. A panel of three judges rejected the Lower Merion residents' contention that the state Department of Education and the school district had denied them a hearing in the case and had ignored historic preservation laws in authorizing the demolition last year.
NEWS
June 20, 2013
By Robert Brehm A Philadelphia building collapses, people are killed, and the public demands reforms to prevent future tragedies. We have seen this sequence of events before. There are lessons to be learned, but not new ones. Engineers already know the inherent dangers of demolition and the reasons for such failures. The questions have been asked 100 times and answered 101 times. But the public outcry winds down, political will diminishes, and contractors complain that they are overregulated.
NEWS
April 10, 1988 | By Leslie Florio, Special to The Inquirer
An uninsured plumbing business destroyed in a Darby Borough fire has been condemned by the Darby Borough Council, and will be demolished at taxpayer expense. The blaze destroyed the Janess Supply Co. Inc. building at New Walnut Street and Chester Pike last Sunday. Also damaged were the Darby Shoe Store at 888 Main St. and an 18-unit apartment building at 896 Main St. On Wednesday, the council voted unanimously to declare the shoe store and the plumbing buildings unsafe and a danger to residents.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
The Burlington County prosecutor has subpoenaed Willingboro School District records as the latest step in its investigation of the demolition of a vacant school building and the use of maintenance workers for the job. The roof of the former Alternate School collapsed March 13 on a team of workers, killing one and injuring five others. School board members were told Monday night about the subpoena, which requests minutes and videotaped recordings of all meetings when the board discussed the building's sale, removal or demolition.
NEWS
August 19, 1994 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
The demolition crew, hired by the city at a cost of $710,000, is primed and ready for the massive demolition of the historic and abandoned Mayfair House in Mount Airy on Monday. But yesterday the owner, Arnav Industries of New York City, went before Common Pleas Judge Russell Nigro seeking an order to block the impending demolition. Nigro delayed a decision and called both sides to his chambers for a meeting today. Carl Primavera, who represents Arnav, said his client was close to an agreement with a new developer and that the 14-story, 244-unit building at Lincoln Drive and Johnson Street could become housing for senior citizens.
NEWS
December 1, 1992 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
A City Council committee hearing is scheduled tonight on a Philadelphia Housing Authority proposal to raze eight dilapidated high-rises at the Raymond Rosen Apartments in North Philadelphia and replace them with townhouses. PHA needs Council's approval to demolish the high-rises and replace them with 814 townhouses that would be built or rehabilitated on or near the site at 23rd and Diamond streets. The agency has applied to the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development for $60 million to fund the project.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | By Lisa Moorhead, Special to The Inquirer
A Victorian home on East Ridley Avenue came tumbling down this week, and if a few Ridley Park residents are correct, the uproar over the demolition has just begun. Council member Jack Petrie announced at a council meeting Tuesday night that 201 E. Ridley Ave. was about 80 percent demolished. A Zoning Hearing Board meeting is scheduled for 7:30 tonight to debate the development of the site, Petrie said. The subject of the demolition sparked disapproval from council member William Pilson, liaison to the borough Historical Commission, and two residents.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | By Rob Wingate, Special to The Inquirer
Newtown Township supervisors have approved a plan that would allow the demolition of the Dunwoody Home on West Chester Pike, which has provided care to the elderly since 1924. But the 4-0 vote Monday was overshadowed by complaints that Dunwoody's trustees have failed to communicate their plans to relatives of current residents - many of whom must now find other accommodations. Dunwoody plans to house 10 of the 40 current residents of the home in a proposed medical facility and relocate the others to different institutions.
NEWS
September 13, 1987 | By Barbara McCabe, Special to The Inquirer
Plans to demolish one of Narberth's 18th-century buildings have left preservationists in the borough feeling helpless. "There doesn't seem to be an awful lot we can do legally," said David Brawer, president of the Narberth Preservation Committee, which was formed to raise the community's consciousness about the historic value of some of the borough's older buildings. Brawer was bemoaning the impending demolition of a rundown old house at 1226 Montgomery Ave. that dates back to 1725.
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NEWS
January 17, 2016
PHILADELPHIA POLICE were looking Friday for a man who, posing as a Department of Licenses and Inspections employee, has been telling residents in North Philadelphia that the city was going to demolish their homes. The incidents occurred Jan. 8 and Wednesday on the 2500 block of North Colorado Street, the 2400 block of West Cumberland Street, and the 2400 block of West Sergeant Street, the Mayor's Office of Communications said in a statement. The man wore a reflective vest and yellow hard hat, but presented no identification.
NEWS
January 17, 2016 | Staff Report
Philadelphia police were looking Friday for a man who, posing as a Department of Licenses and Inspections employee, has been telling residents in North Philadelphia that the city was going to demolish their homes. The incidents occurred Jan. 8 and Wednesday on the 2500 block of North Colorado Street, the 2400 block of West Cumberland Street, and the 2400 block of West Sergeant Street, the Mayor's Office of Communications said in a statement. The man wore a reflective vest and yellow hard hat, but presented no identification.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
With a rumble of its engine, a big yellow backhoe Tuesday crashed its hydraulic arm through a wall of Evesham Township's long-vacant Kmart store, a first step in the demolition - and rehabilitation - of a shopping center the township has long called an eyesore. "It's been a continual process to get where we are today," Mayor Randy Brown told residents and officials gathered at the Tri-Towne Plaza minutes before the backhoe sprang to life in Burlington County's largest municipality. "We've worked longer on this than any other project in Evesham," Brown said.
NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas and Al Lubrano, STAFF WRITERS
The Inspector General's Office found that the Department of Licenses and Inspections failed to follow proper demolition guidelines in nearly 80 percent of cases reviewed over a nine-month period, according to an audit released Tuesday. The audit was launched in response to an Inquirer story, published on Oct. 25, that reported that same rate of mishandled inspections. The Inquirer story was based on the paper's own review of L&I records. The Inspector General's report concluded that "the most significant finding of the audit is that in 57 of 100 permits, inspectors improperly passed at least one inspection that should have been waived or failed.
NEWS
November 3, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Mayor Nutter's request that his inspector general investigate allegations that the Department of Licenses and Inspections isn't properly monitoring demolition sites is unsettling considering how long he took to make that decision. In the 28 months since a wall crashed into the Salvation Army thrift shop at 22nd and Market Streets, leaving six people dead and 13 others injured, it has been as obvious as a wrecking ball that L&I is steeped in dysfunction. It's hard to understand why Nutter waited until he has only about two months left in office to put his toughest investigator on this case.
NEWS
October 21, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW & WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writers shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
AFTER JUST four hours of deliberations yesterday, a jury acquitted demolition contractor Griffin Campbell of six counts of third-degree murder, but convicted him of six counts of involuntary manslaughter in the deadly 2013 collapse of a Center City Salvation Army thrift store. Campbell, 51, a burly man who ran his small construction company out of his Nicetown home, did not react when the jury foreman read the verdicts. His wife, Kim, and one of his four daughters, Amella, 21, cried.
NEWS
October 21, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
For the fatal consequences of putting profit above the lives lost in the 2013 Center City building collapse, a jury found demolition contractor Griffin Campbell guilty of six counts of involuntary manslaughter on Monday. Sean Benschop, who was operating the excavator that sent an unsupported wall crashing onto the thrift store where six were killed, pleaded guilty to similar charges in July. But there is a painful hole in the city that the criminal cases did not address, which may be reflected in the jury's decision not to convict Campbell on the more serious murder charges leveled against him. The man who owned the property and ordered the demolition, and the officials who coddled the reckless and incompetent, have been spared.
NEWS
October 21, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Crews on Monday afternoon still were streaming water onto the smoldering ruins of the main building of the Lulu Country Club - heavily damaged in a weekend fire - when Upper Dublin Township Fire Marshal Tim Schuck emerged from the charred structure carrying the organization's 103-year-old charter. The wooden frame had a fine layer of soot, and its Plexiglas covering was slightly bowed from the intense heat, but the oversize document with the faded signatures of the club's original members and court officials was preserved.
NEWS
October 17, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
They lied. They were mistaken. They never said that to him. For five hours Thursday, demolition contractor Griffin Campbell sat in the witness box and tried to negate 11 days of witnesses who blamed him for the 2013 collapse that crushed the Salvation Army thrift store in Center City, killing six people and injuring 13. It was a varied list: federal job safety officers and city construction inspectors, several of Campbell's own employees, the...
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
FOR GRIFFIN Campbell, landing the job to demolish a group of buildings on Market Street, including the four-story building next to a Center City Salvation Army thrift store, was a big deal. It was his biggest demolition project, the contractor who ran his small Griffin Campbell Construction Co. out of his Nicetown home, on Butler Street near 16th, told a Common Pleas jury. Campbell, 51, charged with six counts of third-degree murder and related offenses in the June 5, 2013, collapse of the Salvation Army store, at 22nd and Market streets - which killed six people and injured 13 - took the witness stand in his own defense late yesterday afternoon.
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