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Demolition

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NEWS
June 28, 1990 | By Cynthia Henry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Residents determined to save Ardmore Junior High from ruins have vowed to fight on despite a Commonwealth Court decision upholding the demolition. Attorney Alan Candor, representing four Lower Merion residents, said Tuesday that he would file an appeal of the June 18 ruling by today's deadline. Meanwhile, the school district is trying to move ahead with the demolition, which now may cost more than the $1.5 million budgeted last year. A panel of three judges rejected the Lower Merion residents' contention that the state Department of Education and the school district had denied them a hearing in the case and had ignored historic preservation laws in authorizing the demolition last year.
NEWS
June 20, 2013
By Robert Brehm A Philadelphia building collapses, people are killed, and the public demands reforms to prevent future tragedies. We have seen this sequence of events before. There are lessons to be learned, but not new ones. Engineers already know the inherent dangers of demolition and the reasons for such failures. The questions have been asked 100 times and answered 101 times. But the public outcry winds down, political will diminishes, and contractors complain that they are overregulated.
NEWS
April 10, 1988 | By Leslie Florio, Special to The Inquirer
An uninsured plumbing business destroyed in a Darby Borough fire has been condemned by the Darby Borough Council, and will be demolished at taxpayer expense. The blaze destroyed the Janess Supply Co. Inc. building at New Walnut Street and Chester Pike last Sunday. Also damaged were the Darby Shoe Store at 888 Main St. and an 18-unit apartment building at 896 Main St. On Wednesday, the council voted unanimously to declare the shoe store and the plumbing buildings unsafe and a danger to residents.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
The Burlington County prosecutor has subpoenaed Willingboro School District records as the latest step in its investigation of the demolition of a vacant school building and the use of maintenance workers for the job. The roof of the former Alternate School collapsed March 13 on a team of workers, killing one and injuring five others. School board members were told Monday night about the subpoena, which requests minutes and videotaped recordings of all meetings when the board discussed the building's sale, removal or demolition.
NEWS
August 19, 1994 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
The demolition crew, hired by the city at a cost of $710,000, is primed and ready for the massive demolition of the historic and abandoned Mayfair House in Mount Airy on Monday. But yesterday the owner, Arnav Industries of New York City, went before Common Pleas Judge Russell Nigro seeking an order to block the impending demolition. Nigro delayed a decision and called both sides to his chambers for a meeting today. Carl Primavera, who represents Arnav, said his client was close to an agreement with a new developer and that the 14-story, 244-unit building at Lincoln Drive and Johnson Street could become housing for senior citizens.
NEWS
December 1, 1992 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
A City Council committee hearing is scheduled tonight on a Philadelphia Housing Authority proposal to raze eight dilapidated high-rises at the Raymond Rosen Apartments in North Philadelphia and replace them with townhouses. PHA needs Council's approval to demolish the high-rises and replace them with 814 townhouses that would be built or rehabilitated on or near the site at 23rd and Diamond streets. The agency has applied to the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development for $60 million to fund the project.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | By Lisa Moorhead, Special to The Inquirer
A Victorian home on East Ridley Avenue came tumbling down this week, and if a few Ridley Park residents are correct, the uproar over the demolition has just begun. Council member Jack Petrie announced at a council meeting Tuesday night that 201 E. Ridley Ave. was about 80 percent demolished. A Zoning Hearing Board meeting is scheduled for 7:30 tonight to debate the development of the site, Petrie said. The subject of the demolition sparked disapproval from council member William Pilson, liaison to the borough Historical Commission, and two residents.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | By Rob Wingate, Special to The Inquirer
Newtown Township supervisors have approved a plan that would allow the demolition of the Dunwoody Home on West Chester Pike, which has provided care to the elderly since 1924. But the 4-0 vote Monday was overshadowed by complaints that Dunwoody's trustees have failed to communicate their plans to relatives of current residents - many of whom must now find other accommodations. Dunwoody plans to house 10 of the 40 current residents of the home in a proposed medical facility and relocate the others to different institutions.
NEWS
September 13, 1987 | By Barbara McCabe, Special to The Inquirer
Plans to demolish one of Narberth's 18th-century buildings have left preservationists in the borough feeling helpless. "There doesn't seem to be an awful lot we can do legally," said David Brawer, president of the Narberth Preservation Committee, which was formed to raise the community's consciousness about the historic value of some of the borough's older buildings. Brawer was bemoaning the impending demolition of a rundown old house at 1226 Montgomery Ave. that dates back to 1725.
NEWS
April 24, 1986 | By Ruth Tallmadge, Special to The Inquirer
Owners of Devonshire townhouses have sought help from the Easttown Township supervisors, saying that First Devon Corp. has failed to maintain structures and grounds at the Sugartown Road development. The residents attended Monday's board meeting to get the supervisors' support for the proposed demolition of outbuildings, which the residents described as being in poor condition and a hazard to children. They won partial support: The supervisors passed a motion approving issuance of a demolition permit for one structure and part of a second structure.
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NEWS
July 27, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A JUDGE YESTERDAY told the attorney for the demolition contractor facing homicide charges in the deadly Salvation Army building collapse two years ago that the contractor's trial will not be about any other entity or person. "I agree with the commonwealth. You may not attempt to put on trial other entities because that does not mitigate" your client's case, Common Pleas Judge Glenn Bronson told defense attorney William Hobson, who represents demolition contractor Griffin Campbell. "The fact other people could be criminally or civilly culpable is not a defense" for Campbell, the judge said during a motions hearing.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Commerce Building in the heart of downtown Camden is set to be demolished starting Saturday, a process expected to take about two weeks. The city's Parking Authority, which owns the one-acre parcel, is turning it into a parking garage. The vacant, eight-story building at the corner of Broadway and Federal Street was built in the 1960s to replace a department store, and sits near City Hall, municipal court, the county court, the Walter Rand Transportation Center, and two PATCO stops.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
THE DRYWALL in Maggie Davis' porch is ready to be painted. Exposed wall outlets need covers. Wires dangling from the kitchen ceiling are prepped for a new fixture to brighten the floor that her husband installed before the 2013 building collapse at 22nd and Market. The half-finished projects are a daily reminder of her loss. Borbor Davis, a 68-year-old Liberian immigrant, was working in the basement of the Salvation Army when a three-story wall of an adjacent building being demolished fell onto the thrift store, killing him and five others and injuring 13. The heartache of losing her best friend in an avoidable accident is unbearable, but so is having to put her mourning on hold to stress over making ends meet.
NEWS
July 19, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A long-vacant former municipal complex at the site of what was a Cold War-era Nike missile base is to be dismantled to make way for a public safety center in Lumberton Township. The base was one of a dozen constructed in the Philadelphia region in the '50s to defend the country against a possible Soviet bomb attack and was decommissioned in 1974. Lumberton, then a mostly rural Burlington County community, renovated the Army base's two dormitories to house its municipal offices and police department.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
A botched demolition that led to the deaths of six people inside a Salvation Army thrift store prompted officials to impose stricter rules to prevent future tragedies. But what good are the rules if the very agency responsible for upholding them lets a demolition proceed without a permit? Not only did that happen. No less than the head of the Department of Licenses and Inspections, Commissioner Carlton Williams, was the culprit. It's yet another lapse in judgment that raises questions about his leadership.
NEWS
July 7, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The commissioner of the city Department of Licenses and Inspections intervened in the demolition of a Point Breeze building in 2014, allowing the structure to come down without required permits. In a complaint to the city Office of the Inspector General, an L&I inspector wrote that the contractor who did the demolition at 24th and Federal Streets got the go-ahead after telling Commissioner Carlton Williams in a private meeting that he was financially strapped and needed to start work to get paid.
NEWS
June 25, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
FINALLY, THERE may be life once again at the old Royal Theater on South Street near 16th, vacant and mostly neglected for more than 40 years. But the new life will come only after the planned demolition of the original building. The Royal was built in 1919 in the classical-revival style by architect Frank E. Hahn and opened in 1920 as one of the first movie theaters for Philadelphia's black residents. It also was an important performance venue for such musical talents as Fats Waller and Bessie Smith.
NEWS
June 2, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The planned demolition of an 1890 mansion once owned by a founder of U.S. Pipe may pale in comparison to another razing that took place at the Burlington City site about 100 years ago, after the stately home had been converted to company offices. The mansion, a three-story Colonial Revival-style building on the Delaware River, was occupied by Andrew McNeal and his family until 1899, when he sold his company to the U.S. Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry, according to an application the city submitted to have the building placed on the state and federal Registers of Historic Places.
NEWS
May 26, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
After decades of neglect, the stately mansion built along the Delaware River in Burlington City for industrialist Andrew McNeal in 1890 is facing almost certain demolition. But few city officials think the historic structure next to the shuttered U.S. Pipe manufacturing plant he founded is worth sparing, given the degree of deterioration. A 2001 fire at the mansion capped 50 years of abandonment, leaving a crumbling, three-story masonry skeleton vulnerable to vandals who have spread ghost stories about the place while posting shaky YouTube videos filmed from inside.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gathered outside a hulking, vacant North Philadelphia commercial building, city officials Wednesday announced a joint initiative between the Department of Licenses and Inspections and the Fire Department to inspect derelict properties. The idea is to evaluate dangerous, empty structures larger than 15,000 square feet - so-called mantraps - for the safety of firefighters and the public. Many such buildings, like the one at 3617 N. Eighth St., will be demolished. But the media event, attended by Mayor Nutter, L&I Commissioner Carlton Williams, Fire Commissioner Derrick Sawyer, and others, also appeared to serve as a forum to bolster Williams as he and his beleaguered department weather a barrage of criticism.
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