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Demolition

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NEWS
March 15, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Mike Newall, and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
The old Shirt Corner fell to pieces Thursday in Old City, sending pedestrians scurrying and jangling nerves in a city where a building collapse last summer killed six people. No one was injured when the empty store collapsed at Third and Market Streets, spilling bricks and debris into the road and sending up a huge cloud of gray dust. Workers were demolishing a building two doors east, which caused debris to land on a middle structure and fall onto the building on the corner, which then fell down, according to Mark Christof, superintendent of general contractor Constructure Management, who spoke at the scene.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | By Cynthia Henry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Residents determined to save Ardmore Junior High from ruins have vowed to fight on despite a Commonwealth Court decision upholding the demolition. Attorney Alan Candor, representing four Lower Merion residents, said Tuesday that he would file an appeal of the June 18 ruling by today's deadline. Meanwhile, the school district is trying to move ahead with the demolition, which now may cost more than the $1.5 million budgeted last year. A panel of three judges rejected the Lower Merion residents' contention that the state Department of Education and the school district had denied them a hearing in the case and had ignored historic preservation laws in authorizing the demolition last year.
NEWS
June 20, 2013
By Robert Brehm A Philadelphia building collapses, people are killed, and the public demands reforms to prevent future tragedies. We have seen this sequence of events before. There are lessons to be learned, but not new ones. Engineers already know the inherent dangers of demolition and the reasons for such failures. The questions have been asked 100 times and answered 101 times. But the public outcry winds down, political will diminishes, and contractors complain that they are overregulated.
NEWS
April 10, 1988 | By Leslie Florio, Special to The Inquirer
An uninsured plumbing business destroyed in a Darby Borough fire has been condemned by the Darby Borough Council, and will be demolished at taxpayer expense. The blaze destroyed the Janess Supply Co. Inc. building at New Walnut Street and Chester Pike last Sunday. Also damaged were the Darby Shoe Store at 888 Main St. and an 18-unit apartment building at 896 Main St. On Wednesday, the council voted unanimously to declare the shoe store and the plumbing buildings unsafe and a danger to residents.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
The Burlington County prosecutor has subpoenaed Willingboro School District records as the latest step in its investigation of the demolition of a vacant school building and the use of maintenance workers for the job. The roof of the former Alternate School collapsed March 13 on a team of workers, killing one and injuring five others. School board members were told Monday night about the subpoena, which requests minutes and videotaped recordings of all meetings when the board discussed the building's sale, removal or demolition.
NEWS
August 19, 1994 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
The demolition crew, hired by the city at a cost of $710,000, is primed and ready for the massive demolition of the historic and abandoned Mayfair House in Mount Airy on Monday. But yesterday the owner, Arnav Industries of New York City, went before Common Pleas Judge Russell Nigro seeking an order to block the impending demolition. Nigro delayed a decision and called both sides to his chambers for a meeting today. Carl Primavera, who represents Arnav, said his client was close to an agreement with a new developer and that the 14-story, 244-unit building at Lincoln Drive and Johnson Street could become housing for senior citizens.
NEWS
December 1, 1992 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
A City Council committee hearing is scheduled tonight on a Philadelphia Housing Authority proposal to raze eight dilapidated high-rises at the Raymond Rosen Apartments in North Philadelphia and replace them with townhouses. PHA needs Council's approval to demolish the high-rises and replace them with 814 townhouses that would be built or rehabilitated on or near the site at 23rd and Diamond streets. The agency has applied to the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development for $60 million to fund the project.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | By Lisa Moorhead, Special to The Inquirer
A Victorian home on East Ridley Avenue came tumbling down this week, and if a few Ridley Park residents are correct, the uproar over the demolition has just begun. Council member Jack Petrie announced at a council meeting Tuesday night that 201 E. Ridley Ave. was about 80 percent demolished. A Zoning Hearing Board meeting is scheduled for 7:30 tonight to debate the development of the site, Petrie said. The subject of the demolition sparked disapproval from council member William Pilson, liaison to the borough Historical Commission, and two residents.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | By Rob Wingate, Special to The Inquirer
Newtown Township supervisors have approved a plan that would allow the demolition of the Dunwoody Home on West Chester Pike, which has provided care to the elderly since 1924. But the 4-0 vote Monday was overshadowed by complaints that Dunwoody's trustees have failed to communicate their plans to relatives of current residents - many of whom must now find other accommodations. Dunwoody plans to house 10 of the 40 current residents of the home in a proposed medical facility and relocate the others to different institutions.
NEWS
September 13, 1987 | By Barbara McCabe, Special to The Inquirer
Plans to demolish one of Narberth's 18th-century buildings have left preservationists in the borough feeling helpless. "There doesn't seem to be an awful lot we can do legally," said David Brawer, president of the Narberth Preservation Committee, which was formed to raise the community's consciousness about the historic value of some of the borough's older buildings. Brawer was bemoaning the impending demolition of a rundown old house at 1226 Montgomery Ave. that dates back to 1725.
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NEWS
March 19, 2014 | BY ASHLEY KUHN, Daily News Staff Writer kuhna@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
DEMOLITION began yesterday on the ornate art deco interior of Center City's 86-year-old Boyd Theatre, three days after the Philadelphia Historical Commission granted the owner permission to gut it and make way for an eight-screen movie house. "There was a small crew there today doing no more than was approved in order to start reconstruction," said Matthew N. McClure of Ballard Spahr, attorney for the building's owner, Live Nation. On Friday, the commission approved a "financial hardship" demolition permit, accepting Live Nation's argument that it was not economically feasible to repurpose the theater, on Chestnut Street near 19th.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
PHILADELPHIA Fearful that demolition is already underway at the historic Boyd Theater, officials at the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia said they would seek a court order Tuesday to stop the owner from proceeding with plans leading to a new multiplex. Workmen were seen moving heavy machinery into the Boyd's ornate auditorium on Monday morning, leading preservationists to conclude that the theater's owner, Live Nation, had begun gutting Center City's last art deco movie palace, said Caroline E. Boyce, the alliance's director.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Workman were seen moving heavy machinery into the Boyd Theater's auditorium Monday morning, leading Philadelphia preservationists to conclude that its owner, Live Nation, has begun demolition of Center City's last art deco movie palace. The Preservation Alliance's advocacy director, Ben Leech, said he could clearly hear hammering sounds when he walked past the theater's Sansom Street exit doors. "I can't think of what else they'd be doing other than demolition," he said. He noted that a demolition permit was posted on the theater's Chestnut Street facade this weekend.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA When Bobby Williams bought his house on Euclid Avenue eight years ago, he didn't mind the two vacant houses next door and two others across the street. The father of four had just gotten a great deal on his home in Strawberry Mansion. But time quickly took a toll on the neighboring properties - roofs collapsed, porches sank - and a few more addresses on his block were left for the raccoons. "They won't give me fire insurance because of this one," Williams, 36, said Friday, pointing to the dilapidated rowhouse next door.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
AFTER HEARING hours of passionate testimony, the Philadelphia Historical Commission yesterday approved a Florida company's application to partially demolish the former Boyd Theatre in Center City. The company, iPic-Gold Class Entertainment, plans to raze much of the building, on Chestnut Street near 19th, and transform it into an upscale eight-screen movie theater. But those against the building's demolition plan to appeal. Howard Haas, president of the Friends of the Boyd, one of the leading advocates against its demolition, testified yesterday that a local foundation, which wants to remain anonymous, has committed to pay the $4.5 million purchase price for the Boyd.
NEWS
March 15, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Mike Newall, and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
The old Shirt Corner fell to pieces Thursday in Old City, sending pedestrians scurrying and jangling nerves in a city where a building collapse last summer killed six people. No one was injured when the empty store collapsed at Third and Market Streets, spilling bricks and debris into the road and sending up a huge cloud of gray dust. Workers were demolishing a building two doors east, which caused debris to land on a middle structure and fall onto the building on the corner, which then fell down, according to Mark Christof, superintendent of general contractor Constructure Management, who spoke at the scene.
NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
A Philadelphia Historical Commission panel granted preliminary approval Thursday to a Florida entertainment company to demolish the Boyd Theater's lavish art-deco interior, despite an anonymous donor's last-minute offer to save the city's only surviving relic of Hollywood's golden age. In reaching its decision, the Committee on Financial Hardship concluded that the large movie house could not be redeveloped at a reasonable cost, and that the purchase...
NEWS
February 8, 2014 | By Bob Warner and Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
PHILADELPHIA A five-bill package intended to strengthen the city's regulation of demolition practices, impose more requirements on contractors, and demand closer supervision by city inspectors won unanimous passage in City Council on Thursday. Many of the changes - such as requiring safety plans as part of an application for any demolition permit - have already been implemented by the Nutter administration, spurred by the building collapse in June that killed six people at 22d and Market Streets.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The fate of the historic Boyd Theater, Center City's imperiled onetime movie palace, remained in limbo Tuesday after a Philadelphia Historical Commission panel postponed taking a position on whether to recommend its demolition for redevelopment. The committee on financial hardship, whose recommendation must be issued before a final decision is made, heard from supporters and detractors before promising to continue the proceedings before the full commission meets to vote on Feb. 14. The move ended four hours of testimony that began with a lengthy 9 a.m. presentation by Matthew McClure, lawyer for owner Live Nation and the cinema concern iPic-Gold Class Entertainment, arguing that demolition of a large portion of the theater was an economically feasible option where few others existed.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Update: Tuesday's historical commission adjourned without a vote and another hearing is being considered before mid-February. Earlier Story An analysis by an outside consultant hired by the Philadelphia Historical Commission to assess the viability of the historic and deteriorating Boyd Theater on Chestnut Street concludes that redevelopment "is not economically feasible without significant public subsidies. " The conclusion - that only a large infusion of public cash can save the Boyd - could be critical to forthcoming decisions from historical commission panels.
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