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Demolition

NEWS
August 6, 1989 | By Suzanne Gordon and Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Lower Merion School District has awarded contracts for demolishing the Ardmore Junior High School, but the building will not be razed until the state's acting secretary of education rules on an appeal by residents opposing the demolition. The board, meeting at 8 a.m. Thursday, awarded about $1.5 million in contracts, the largest portion of it - $1.2 million - to P. Agnes Inc. of Philadelphia as general contractor in the demolition and reconstruction of the school's gymnasium.
NEWS
May 4, 1994 | by Joanne Sills, Daily News Staff Writer Barbara Laker contributed to this report
City Council President John Street is seeking a delay in proposed plans to demolish abandoned houses in a North Philadelphia neighborhood plagued by large-scale drug trafficking, an aide to Street said yesterday. Street wants city housing agencies, the Department of Licenses and Inspection and neighborhood residents in the Allegheny West section of North Philadelphia to formulate a long-term plan for the troubled area, said the aide, Darrell Clarke. However, L&I Commissioner Bennett Levin, who announced the demolition plans, said Street's office hadn't contacted him. Levin also refused to confirm whether he had signed a demolition order yesterday for the houses, as he said he had planned.
NEWS
January 10, 1991 | By Thomas Hine, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The city Historical Commission voted yesterday to allow the University of Pennsylvania to demolish Smith Hall, an 1892 laboratory building that its advocates say is a landmark in the histories of science and education. The commission voted by 8-1 - with two commissioners who have Penn connections abstaining - to allow the razing of the building, which is on the east side of 34th Street between Walnut and Spruce Streets. The commission's approval requires that the university possess all necessary funding and regulatory approvals for the building that will replace Smith Hall before the demolition can proceed.
NEWS
May 10, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral, a decade after withering criticism of what many viewed as a destructive renovation of its own ornate Victorian interior, is planning to demolish two historically certified brownstone structures in the 3800 block of Chestnut Street to make way for a 25-story apartment tower. The project, which goes before the Philadelphia Historical Commission Friday, would obliterate the cathedral's parish houses, designed by the noted ecclesiastical architect Charles M. Burns, and connect the proposed tower and administrative offices to the church itself via glass-enclosed walkways cut into the cathedral's fa├žade.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
ALTHOUGH BILLS to regulate demolitions following the deadly June 5 building collapse at 22nd and Market streets were introduced just yesterday, fault lines are beginning to emerge over how to shape those policies. Mayor Nutter's administration, which issued its own demolition reforms the week of the collapse, is quietly pushing back on several key provisions of the five-bill package. And within the special Council committee that produced the bills, some members are at odds over what the scope of the legislation ought to be and how it will impact smaller contractors and undocumented workers.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Collingdale officials have agreed that a vacant apartment building at Pine Street and Pusey Avenue should be demolished. At its meeting Monday, the Borough Council unanimously endorsed a suggestion by Councilman William E. McGowan that the owner of the property, the Warren Bollinger estate, be notified that the building should be torn down. The eight-unit building was inspected by borough engineer John P. Damon, who called it "structurally unsafe, hazardous and a public nuisance," borough manager Stephen J. Beckson said.
NEWS
March 8, 1987 | By Ann Marie Escher, Special to The Inquirer
Two petitions have been presented to the East Fallowfield Township Board of Supervisors protesting the proposed demolition of the Mortonville Bridge on Strasburg Road. The narrow bridge, built in 1826, has deteriorating stone walls. The bridge is on a state road and is part of the National Register of Historic Places. The state Department of Transportation wants to demolish the bridge and replace it, according to Supervisor Emil Meyer. The township's Historical Commission wants to reconstruct the bridge, keeping its original form.
NEWS
October 14, 2006 | By Jeff Price INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"The cabin is saved!" Ted Pollard, president of the Radnor Historical Society, was excited yesterday after Eastern University readily agree to postpone Monday's scheduled demolition of the historic log cabin on its St. Davids campus. "We're still all in shock!" Until the meeting between university president David Black and Pollard and other supporters of historical preservation, the outlook didn't look good for what a 1925 architectural book said was likely the most "elaborate log building in this country.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | by Bob Warner and Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writers
Paul DuSold's portrait studio is in the demolition zone. He and about 30 other painters, sculptors and photographers are in line to lose their rented space in a former factory on 12th Street if the city goes ahead with Mayor Street's stadium plan. Well over 100 properties - many vacant, but others developed as businesses, studios or condos - would be leveled to line out a playing field for the Phillies. And DuSold, whose paintings hang in Pennsylvania Hospital, the Union League and Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, would miss his fifth-floor studio on 12th Street near Wood.
NEWS
April 18, 1990 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
Cherry Hill Township has threatened to tear down the unfinished condominiums of the Hamlets development if the builder or the mortgage holder does not make the construction area safe by Friday. Earlier this month, the township building inspector cited the financially troubled InterDevelCo for construction violations because the open structures created a safety hazard. Since then, neither the firm nor Howard Savings Bank has made any move to correct the situation. "There is imminent danger to the public, and we don't know when these problems are going to be addressed," said chief inspector Anthony Saccomanno.
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