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Demolition

NEWS
June 20, 1988 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
When the South Jersey Port Corp. opened bids for the demolition of its rusting old shipways on the Delaware River in Camden last year, the news seemed too good to be true. The agency's consulting engineers had estimated that dismantling the 10- acre site, former home of the defunct New York Shipbuilding Corp., would cost $2.6 million. But the low bidder came in at only $494,316, $1.5 million less than the next-lowest one and less than one-fifth of the estimate from S.T. Hudson Engineers of Camden.
NEWS
August 3, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
A demolition derby rampage at the PennDot yard in North Philadelphia Monday night caused an estimated $175,000 to $200,000 in damage to vehicles and a repair building at the facility, an agency official said Tuesday. The intruder - or intruders - used a crew truck to ram the building, a dump truck, two other crew trucks and an equipment loader at the yarf at Blaine and Ruffner Streets in Nicetown, officials said. State Police are investigating the break-in, but due to budget cutbacks, the surveillance camera contract for the facility had expired and investigators have no videos to examine.
NEWS
June 8, 2013 | Inquirer Staff
Mayor Nutter and Licenses and Inspection Commissioner Carlton Williams are to announce new proposed demolition standards and controls for the city. The move comes two days after six people were killed and 14 others injured when a Center City thrift store collapsed during the botched demolition of a building next door. The mayor, Williams and other city officials are to outline the proposed standards and controls at a 2 p.m. news conference at City Hall.
NEWS
May 14, 1988 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden's city-operated demolition program has not been insured since February, and it has no insurance policy to pay for the demolition accident that damaged a South Camden cabinet shop Wednesday, city officials said yesterday. But the city's risk manager, Bill Murray, said that while Cigna Corp. canceled demolition coverage from the city's $1.6 million premium, it may pay for at least some of the damage. He said Cigna was sending a representative to assess the damage to the cabinet shop.
NEWS
February 8, 2014 | By Bob Warner and Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
PHILADELPHIA A five-bill package intended to strengthen the city's regulation of demolition practices, impose more requirements on contractors, and demand closer supervision by city inspectors won unanimous passage in City Council on Thursday. Many of the changes - such as requiring safety plans as part of an application for any demolition permit - have already been implemented by the Nutter administration, spurred by the building collapse in June that killed six people at 22d and Market Streets.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2000 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
Dust off the bulldozers and the wrecking ball. Wayne Spilove, who wants to build a 12-story self-parking garage with storefronts on Sansom Street near 16th, got a judge's go-ahead yesterday to begin tearing down 10 unoccupied buildings he owns on the block to make way for the project. But don't start your engines quite yet. Within hours of Common Pleas Judge Gerald Levin's ruling, Spilove's attorney, Carl S. Primavera, got a call from Mayor Street and agreed to postpone demolition until cost estimates come in for alternative plans that would keep the original facades.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2012 | Stephan Salisbury
No decision on demolition of cathedral buildings The Philadelphia Historical Commission failed to reach a decision Friday on whether to allow the Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral to demolish two historic buildings in the 3800 block of Chestnut Street and erect a 25-story apartment tower on the site. The cathedral, around the corner on 38th Street, is seeking to tear down its own parish houses, designed over a century ago by noted church architect Charles Burns, who also designed the cathedral.
NEWS
February 23, 1992 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
A group of Mount Holly residents has filed an appeal in court against a Planning Board decision allowing the demolition of the 19th-century Newbold House on Madison Avenue. Moorestown lawyer Alfred Faxon, hired by the group last week, filed the appeal in Superior Court on Tuesday. Faxon said the appeal contends that the Planning Board adopted the resolution allowing the demolition of the building by its owner, Memorial Hospital of Burlington County, "without sufficient findings.
NEWS
October 9, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Controller Alan Butkovitz called in authorities to deal with a hazardous building in North Philadelphia on Saturday after neighbors complained that they had not been able to get action on their own. After Butkovitz's intercession - he called 911 and gave dispatchers his city title, he said - the Fire and Police Departments responded and called in the Department of Licenses and Inspections to knock down what remained of the vacant two-story brick...
NEWS
March 15, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Mike Newall, and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
The old Shirt Corner fell to pieces Thursday in Old City, sending pedestrians scurrying and jangling nerves in a city where a building collapse last summer killed six people. No one was injured when the empty store collapsed at Third and Market Streets, spilling bricks and debris into the road and sending up a huge cloud of gray dust. Workers were demolishing a building two doors east, which caused debris to land on a middle structure and fall onto the building on the corner, which then fell down, according to Mark Christof, superintendent of general contractor Constructure Management, who spoke at the scene.
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