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Demolition

NEWS
March 15, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Mike Newall, and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
The old Shirt Corner fell to pieces Thursday in Old City, sending pedestrians scurrying and jangling nerves in a city where a building collapse last summer killed six people. No one was injured when the empty store collapsed at Third and Market Streets, spilling bricks and debris into the road and sending up a huge cloud of gray dust. Workers were demolishing a building two doors east, which caused debris to land on a middle structure and fall onto the building on the corner, which then fell down, according to Mark Christof, superintendent of general contractor Constructure Management, who spoke at the scene.
NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
A Philadelphia Historical Commission panel granted preliminary approval Thursday to a Florida entertainment company to demolish the Boyd Theater's lavish art-deco interior, despite an anonymous donor's last-minute offer to save the city's only surviving relic of Hollywood's golden age. In reaching its decision, the Committee on Financial Hardship concluded that the large movie house could not be redeveloped at a reasonable cost, and that the purchase...
NEWS
February 8, 2014 | By Bob Warner and Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
PHILADELPHIA A five-bill package intended to strengthen the city's regulation of demolition practices, impose more requirements on contractors, and demand closer supervision by city inspectors won unanimous passage in City Council on Thursday. Many of the changes - such as requiring safety plans as part of an application for any demolition permit - have already been implemented by the Nutter administration, spurred by the building collapse in June that killed six people at 22d and Market Streets.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The fate of the historic Boyd Theater, Center City's imperiled onetime movie palace, remained in limbo Tuesday after a Philadelphia Historical Commission panel postponed taking a position on whether to recommend its demolition for redevelopment. The committee on financial hardship, whose recommendation must be issued before a final decision is made, heard from supporters and detractors before promising to continue the proceedings before the full commission meets to vote on Feb. 14. The move ended four hours of testimony that began with a lengthy 9 a.m. presentation by Matthew McClure, lawyer for owner Live Nation and the cinema concern iPic-Gold Class Entertainment, arguing that demolition of a large portion of the theater was an economically feasible option where few others existed.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Update: Tuesday's historical commission adjourned without a vote and another hearing is being considered before mid-February. Earlier Story An analysis by an outside consultant hired by the Philadelphia Historical Commission to assess the viability of the historic and deteriorating Boyd Theater on Chestnut Street concludes that redevelopment "is not economically feasible without significant public subsidies. " The conclusion - that only a large infusion of public cash can save the Boyd - could be critical to forthcoming decisions from historical commission panels.
NEWS
January 26, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST DEPTFORD A West Deptford oil refinery intertwined with local politics will bid goodbye to one of its main edifices early Saturday. That's when Sunoco Logistics will implode the Eagle Point refinery's 65-year-old "fractionator" - the heaviest refining unit at the site, towering an estimated 200 feet. The "controlled implosion" will last about two minutes and also demolish a tower and chimney, West Deptford officials said. A rusty-looking dome, the fractionator - referred to in the industry as a "cat cracker," and used to convert crude oil into other fuels - was built in 1949, according to Sunoco.
NEWS
December 25, 2013 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Starting Jan. 1, contractors working in Philadelphia will have to prove they have paid their city taxes and have the appropriate insurance, or they will not be issued the necessary work permits. The change grew out of moves Mayor Nutter announced this summer to expand the city's oversight of contractors after the Market Street building collapse that killed six people. "That's always the goal, to increase oversight and just make sure everyone is playing by the rules," Rebecca Swanson, spokeswoman for the Department of Licenses and Inspections, said Monday.
NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
The message came through loud and clear: The buildings in the 2100 block of Market Street needed to come down, and their chief owner was growing impatient. He'd stopped by in late April and was "shocked" to see them still standing. The aide who passed that news along put shocked in capital letters. A new cache of e-mails tied to the Center City building collapse sheds light on one of the basic questions about the deadly June accident: why the owners pressed forward with plans to tear down a four-story brick building amid serious safety concerns about the one-story Salvation Army thrift shop next door.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
For days, the workers at the Salvation Army thrift shop on Market Street said, they heard noises from outside and above. "Like a giant mouse running down the wall," assistant manager Richard Stasiorowski testified. "Every day, at some point, we would hear something. " "All of us would say, 'Oh, my God,' " manager Margarita Agosto said. " 'Imagine if this falls on us.' " But they did not alert the demolition crew next door or their Salvation Army supervisor. They said he already knew.
NEWS
November 27, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
"GREED. " That's what District Attorney Seth Williams says motivated contractor Griffin Campbell to allegedly cut corners and ignore safety when running the demolition project near 22nd and Market streets that caused the deaths of six people in June. A grand jury has charged Campbell with six counts of third-degree murder, six counts of involuntary manslaughter and other offenses that could put him behind bars for the rest of his life, Williams announced yesterday. "It was Campbell who decided on the method of demolition.
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