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Demolition

NEWS
June 2, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The planned demolition of an 1890 mansion once owned by a founder of U.S. Pipe may pale in comparison to another razing that took place at the Burlington City site about 100 years ago, after the stately home had been converted to company offices. The mansion, a three-story Colonial Revival-style building on the Delaware River, was occupied by Andrew McNeal and his family until 1899, when he sold his company to the U.S. Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry, according to an application the city submitted to have the building placed on the state and federal Registers of Historic Places.
NEWS
May 26, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
After decades of neglect, the stately mansion built along the Delaware River in Burlington City for industrialist Andrew McNeal in 1890 is facing almost certain demolition. But few city officials think the historic structure next to the shuttered U.S. Pipe manufacturing plant he founded is worth sparing, given the degree of deterioration. A 2001 fire at the mansion capped 50 years of abandonment, leaving a crumbling, three-story masonry skeleton vulnerable to vandals who have spread ghost stories about the place while posting shaky YouTube videos filmed from inside.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gathered outside a hulking, vacant North Philadelphia commercial building, city officials Wednesday announced a joint initiative between the Department of Licenses and Inspections and the Fire Department to inspect derelict properties. The idea is to evaluate dangerous, empty structures larger than 15,000 square feet - so-called mantraps - for the safety of firefighters and the public. Many such buildings, like the one at 3617 N. Eighth St., will be demolished. But the media event, attended by Mayor Nutter, L&I Commissioner Carlton Williams, Fire Commissioner Derrick Sawyer, and others, also appeared to serve as a forum to bolster Williams as he and his beleaguered department weather a barrage of criticism.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
In the 22 months since a botched Center City demolition killed six people, the city's Department of Licenses and Inspections, the public's best hope for protection from future collapses, has continued to founder despite Mayor Nutter's promises to the contrary. In a dramatic move after the collapse, Nutter called for inspections of all demolition sites. But according to an audit by City Controller Alan Butkovitz nearly a year later, there was no documentation to prove inspections took place at almost half the 442 demolition sites L&I said it inspected.
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The lone demolition company still under contract to perform some work as part of Camden's large-scale demolition project backed out of the agreement Thursday, according to the city. Burlington County-based Winzinger Inc. had been awarded the contract to raze 101 buildings as part of the city's planned demolition of almost 600 abandoned and dilapidated properties. But after numerous problems arose with contracts issued in the bidding process, city officials asked the Camden County Improvement Authority to take control of the project earlier this month.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writers
Demolition began Saturday on the historic Boyd Theater, with wrecking crews tearing down the part of the L-shaped building that lines Sansom Street. "The theater was a precious resource that can't really be replaced," said harpist and composer Saul Davis, who lives across Chestnut Street from the front of the theater. Davis, who led early fights to save the theater from demolition, said he retreated to his bedroom to avoid the upsetting sounds of the building being torn down.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden's plan to rid its streets of close to 600 vacant and dilapidated buildings, which has stalled in recent months due to problems with the contracts that were awarded, moved out of the hands of city officials Thursday as the Camden County Improvement Authority took control. The authority has been assisting Camden from the beginning but will now have a lead role via a shared-services agreement. Since announcing the project last year with much fanfare, city officials have struggled to get it off the ground.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying he had serious concerns about the city's oversight of demolitions, City Controller Alan Butkovitz subpoenaed voluminous documents from the Department of Licenses and Inspections on Monday. In a letter to L&I Commissioner Carlton Williams, Butkovitz said he was launching an investigation into the department's adherence to stringent safety rules enacted after the Center City building collapse that killed six people in 2013. His action comes one day after The Inquirer reported that L&I allowed an illegal demolition at 26th and Poplar Streets last year.
NEWS
February 12, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Less than a month after Camden officials trumpeted the launch of a project to demolish nearly 600 of the city's abandoned properties, the company that signed on for most of the work has backed away from the deal. National Demolition & Recycling, the Hamilton, N.J., company that submitted winning bids for 531 of the properties slated for teardown, told the city in a letter last week that it was withdrawing, citing concerns over asbestos removal as one reason. Camden spokesman Vincent Basara said the city had discussed the asbestos issues with the company before bidding took place.
NEWS
February 11, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Fairmount Park Welcome Center - the 1960 flying-saucer-shape building in John F. Kennedy Plaza, a favorite of mid-century design enthusiasts - leads a list of seven endangered sites issued Monday by the statewide educational and advocacy group Preservation Pennsylvania. The round building, at the southwest corner of what is known as LOVE Park, is threatened by a planned city redesign of the plaza. No design decision has been made, but the Welcome Center's precarious place in the city's future prompted the Preservation Alliance of Greater Philadelphia to name it one of four "Places to Save" last year.
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