CollectionsDemolition
IN THE NEWS

Demolition

NEWS
July 26, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Controller Alan Butkovitz is planning an audit of city demolition practices, at least the fourth investigation spurred by a deadly Center City building collapse last month. The Controller's Office sent a letter Wednesday to the commissioner of licenses and inspections, Carlton Williams, saying it intended to audit "the policies and procedures" used by L&I and other agencies to monitor private and publicly funded demolition projects. "The objective of this audit will be to evaluate the adequacy of the inspection and enforcement procedures pertaining to building demolitions, including the 300 demolitions the city reportedly inspected after the June 5, 2013, Market Street building collapse," Deputy City Controller Gerald V. Micciulla told Williams.
NEWS
July 21, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
After weeks of withholding records related to the Center City building collapse, the Nutter administration reversed course Friday, releasing hundreds of pages of e-mails, inspection reports, and other documents, and posting them on a city website. The administration continued to insist that "some or all of these records" might be exempt from disclosure under state law. But the mayor's office said "the city has, in its discretion, concluded that the public interest is better served by their release.
NEWS
July 18, 2013
Deputy Mayor Alan Greenberger acknowledged Tuesday that he did not alert city building inspectors after he was warned in May of dangerous conditions at the Market Street demolition site. Within an hour of receiving that warning, Greenberger said, he got another e-mail suggesting the problems were being resolved. Story, B1.
NEWS
July 18, 2013
What's a human life worth? Apparently not enough when it came to weighing the possibility that someone might die if a Philadelphia building wasn't demolished properly. Although they were warned of that danger, none of the people who could have prevented a tragedy acted before the worst thing imaginable occurred. The demolition of a Center City building went ahead and, on June 5, caused a wall to fall on an adjacent Salvation Army thrift store, killing six people and injuring 13. How do we know there were missed opportunities to prevent deaths and injuries?
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Mark Fazlollah, and Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writers
In the weeks before the deadly Market Street collapse, the building's owner repeatedly warned top city officials and Salvation Army officials that the demolition could endanger the adjacent Salvation Army thrift store. But that did not prompt the city to step in. Nor did it stop the owner from rapidly demolishing the building - with devastating consequences. E-mails and letters reviewed by The Inquirer show repeated warnings about a possible collapse with potentially deadly results.
NEWS
July 13, 2013
More than a month after the fatal building collapse at 22d and Market Streets, Mayor Nutter is still withholding pertinent public records. Nutter, who promised voters a transparent government, says it's because a grand jury is investigating the collapse. But the office of District Attorney Seth Williams, which is overseeing the investigation, says Nutter does not have to suppress public information. Reinforcing public-records experts' analysis, a Williams spokeswoman said in a statement that "there is no reason that public officials cannot discuss issues of public policy arising from publicly available facts and materials.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2013 | By Samantha Melamed, For The Inquirer
On a sunny Saturday morning in June, a four-bedroom, 1,700-square-foot home in Radnor was facing a death sentence. The house was no more than 65 years old, but by the following Tuesday, it would be coming down to make way for something bigger and better, or at least more current. Its demise, though, would not be in vain. Enter Kevin Tobin, the man behind Pre-Demolition Sales. Owners call him in ahead of the wrecking ball - sometimes at the last minute - and he inventories everything from roof tiles to flooring, HVAC systems, wainscoting, shrubs, and patios, scrawling prices in marker on the soon-to-be-razed walls.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
NORMANDY BEACH, N.J. - It's not hard to see why they call Sandy the "Wicked Witch of the East" here in northern Ocean County. Cedar-shingled A-frame homes blown and washed from their foundations do look a lot like they crash-landed from the sky onto sand-covered streets. But not for much longer, as a walking tour led by state Environmental Protection Commissioner Bob Martin made clear Wednesday. These homes - an enduring symbol of Sandy's wrath, much like the marooned roller coaster in the ocean - are being systematically torn down.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
The chairman of the state House Urban Affairs Committee said Tuesday that he expected the legislature to move to strengthen safety requirements for city demolition projects. "I don't see it as an issue in rural areas, but where you have larger cities where there's a tremendous amount of people, you need to take precautions, and the people that are taking down those type of buildings need to be professionals," said State Rep. Mario M. Scavello (R., Monroe), a former mayor of Mount Pocono.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
DOES ENGINE 46, the empty, eye-catching firehouse that lords over a chunk of South Philly, have a date with a wrecking ball? That's been the buzz around Pennsport since reports first surfaced in the spring that a demolition permit had been tacked to a window of the 119-year-old building, which sits at Reed and Water streets. The news website PlanPhilly reported last month that Cedar Realty Trust, the New York-based company that owns the firehouse and the nearby Riverview movie theater, had indeed filed for a demolition permit in January and February.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|