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Denny Somach

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
For decades, Denny Somach, rock entrepreneur, author, and collector, has lived the life Jay Z so memorably described: "I'm not a businessman, I'm a business, man. " He has a new book, Get the Led Out: How Led Zeppelin Became the Biggest Band in the World , which he'll read from on Thursday at Main Point Books in Bryn Mawr. He's also on a quest to start an International Classic Rock Society website and museum (perhaps in Philadelphia). And that's just the beginning. "I had no idea any of this would work, but figured it's a great way to earn money, meet girls, and have fun until I found a real job," says Somach, an Allentown native with offices in Havertown.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1995 | by Bill Wedo, Daily News Staff Writer
Denny Somach is starting to worry. His framed gold record of "Abbey Road," the one John Lennon owned, the one he snagged from another collector in 1979, is missing. The converted stone house in Havertown, headquarters of his two-year-old rock collectibles company, Musicom International, is being renovated. That gold record is probably just hidden behind one of the piles of papers or pictures or record and videos. But then again . . . As a muttering Somach pokes among the clutter, it's easy to view this scene as borderline symbolic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1994 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The brainstorm came one night two years ago as he was watching a TV home- shopping show. "There was Mickey Mantle holding up an autographed baseball, selling it for $295," recalls Denny Somach, the onetime WYSP-FM (94.1) jock who's since become an independent radio producer, author and agent for John DeBella. "I looked at him and said to myself, 'That's a great idea, sports memorabilia.' But I also knew that more people in the world know who Mick Jagger and Paul McCartney are than Mickey Mantle.
NEWS
June 26, 2007 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Rock-and-roll rip-offs? Havertown's Denny Somach has been shopping an idea for a radio/TV/Internet series called Cold Cases of Rock 'n' Roll , which will explore musical thievery through the years. Somach, a classic-rock expert and WYSP alum, pitched the concept to Sirius satellite radio. Howard Stern , a classic-rock freak, got wind of it. Somach is due at 8:30 a.m. tomorrow on Stern's show (Channel 100). Stern particularly is piqued by Led Zeppelin , which has been accused of lifting its early-1970s chestnut "Stairway to Heaven" from a jam tune released three years before called "Taurus" by Spirit , a psychedelic band fronted by a dude named Randy California . "I just present all the evidence," says Somach, adding that only a few cases ("He's So Fine"/"My Sweet Lord")
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
AIN'T IT great when all the stars align? Denny Somach is feeling just such a magical, mystical moment as he and others aim to spread a "Whole Lotta Love" for one of the biggest rock bands of all times - Led Zeppelin - with a rash of new goodies, including a lavish book, CD and DVD sets, tribute concerts and even a major TV salute. Producer of the nationally syndicated "Get the Let Out" weekly and daily radio features, Somach has been on the bluesy Brit band's case since the early 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1986 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
Opinions run deep and divergent about "New Age" or "Whole Earth" music. Critics of this studied folk-classical-jazz blend lump it all together as "mood music for the 1980s," or "audio valium. " Supporters of this musical amalgam celebrate its humanistic bent, its ability not only to entertain, but also to soothe away the worries of the everyday world. To their thinking, new age music is more lyrical than a poem by Browning, as organic as tofu, as spiritual as Zen meditation.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1995 | By Ciaran P. McNally, FOR THE INQUIRER
They've been likened to minor league baseball teams and microbreweries - without Michael Jordan or the rich amber flavor, of course. But don't let the diminutive adjectives fool you. Independent record companies (those not owned by one of the six multinational, so-called major labels) have major impact on the music world. And many of these "indies" are based in the Philadelphia area. Although the exact number is difficult to pin down, experts estimate that 150 to 200 record labels operate in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
July 13, 1992 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Above all, I owe you, the listeners, a great debt of gratitude that I cannot repay," said Bill Campbell, choking back the emotion. "Good day, good sports and God bless you. " With that, the WIP-AM (610) talker - the dean of Philadelphia sportscasters - pretty much brought down the curtain Friday on a career that has spanned almost 40 years. He had intended to deliver a longer goodbye, a longer thank-you to his legion of fans. Unfortunately, his emotions got the better of him. So Campbell cut his own so-long short.
NEWS
July 20, 1987 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
"I see the audience for Cinema Records to be 70 percent male," says radio consultant Lee Abrams, who has launched the new Havertown-based art-rock label with two local scene-shakers - syndicated radio producer Denny Somach and rock group Cinderella's manager, Larry Mazer. "I see the ultra-hip, artsy 16-to-22-year-old," continues Abrams, Cinema's conceptual and musical adviser. "The rest would be the 23-to-40- year-olds who grew up with Yes and Genesis, and are ready for the next level.
NEWS
December 7, 1995 | By Laura Genao, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Denny Somach remembers the first time he met Fab Four guitarist George Harrison: It was 1974 and they were both at a Los Angeles party. "Harrison turned to me and asked me to get a drunken Joe Cocker out of the room," recalled Somach, 42, a former record producer. "It wasn't until later that I thought, 'George Harrison just asked me to remove Joe Cocker from the room.' " The Beatles and the Rolling Stones were part of an era when musicians, not technology, drove music, Somach said recently.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
For decades, Denny Somach, rock entrepreneur, author, and collector, has lived the life Jay Z so memorably described: "I'm not a businessman, I'm a business, man. " He has a new book, Get the Led Out: How Led Zeppelin Became the Biggest Band in the World , which he'll read from on Thursday at Main Point Books in Bryn Mawr. He's also on a quest to start an International Classic Rock Society website and museum (perhaps in Philadelphia). And that's just the beginning. "I had no idea any of this would work, but figured it's a great way to earn money, meet girls, and have fun until I found a real job," says Somach, an Allentown native with offices in Havertown.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
AIN'T IT great when all the stars align? Denny Somach is feeling just such a magical, mystical moment as he and others aim to spread a "Whole Lotta Love" for one of the biggest rock bands of all times - Led Zeppelin - with a rash of new goodies, including a lavish book, CD and DVD sets, tribute concerts and even a major TV salute. Producer of the nationally syndicated "Get the Let Out" weekly and daily radio features, Somach has been on the bluesy Brit band's case since the early 1970s.
NEWS
June 26, 2007 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Rock-and-roll rip-offs? Havertown's Denny Somach has been shopping an idea for a radio/TV/Internet series called Cold Cases of Rock 'n' Roll , which will explore musical thievery through the years. Somach, a classic-rock expert and WYSP alum, pitched the concept to Sirius satellite radio. Howard Stern , a classic-rock freak, got wind of it. Somach is due at 8:30 a.m. tomorrow on Stern's show (Channel 100). Stern particularly is piqued by Led Zeppelin , which has been accused of lifting its early-1970s chestnut "Stairway to Heaven" from a jam tune released three years before called "Taurus" by Spirit , a psychedelic band fronted by a dude named Randy California . "I just present all the evidence," says Somach, adding that only a few cases ("He's So Fine"/"My Sweet Lord")
NEWS
October 1, 2000 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Did you like the movie Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery? Enough to sit through it about 30 times? Lyn Lonker did just that, but, for her, it was more business than pleasure. Lonker is the senior director of production and creativity for Collectible Concepts Group Inc., a Doylestown-based company that develops and markets entertainment, sports and music collectibles. Founded eight years ago by Paul Lipschutz, the company began by selling sports memorabilia under the name USA Sports Group.
NEWS
December 7, 1995 | By Laura Genao, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Denny Somach remembers the first time he met Fab Four guitarist George Harrison: It was 1974 and they were both at a Los Angeles party. "Harrison turned to me and asked me to get a drunken Joe Cocker out of the room," recalled Somach, 42, a former record producer. "It wasn't until later that I thought, 'George Harrison just asked me to remove Joe Cocker from the room.' " The Beatles and the Rolling Stones were part of an era when musicians, not technology, drove music, Somach said recently.
NEWS
November 17, 1995 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
How can the Beatles make a comeback - if they've never really gone away? Authors of the most memorable pop melodies and positive-spirited sentiments to be crafted in the past four decades, the Fab Four's perfect songs of love and peace have hardly faded from the public eye or consciousness. Forbes Magazine reported in 1994 that the Beatles were still the top grossing band in the world, based mostly on disc, radio and live performance royalties. Pumping things up even more was "The Beatles At the BBC," a two- CD set of early '60s sessions, which sold a surprising 10 million copies.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1995 | By Ciaran P. McNally, FOR THE INQUIRER
They've been likened to minor league baseball teams and microbreweries - without Michael Jordan or the rich amber flavor, of course. But don't let the diminutive adjectives fool you. Independent record companies (those not owned by one of the six multinational, so-called major labels) have major impact on the music world. And many of these "indies" are based in the Philadelphia area. Although the exact number is difficult to pin down, experts estimate that 150 to 200 record labels operate in the Philadelphia area.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1995 | by Bill Wedo, Daily News Staff Writer
Denny Somach is starting to worry. His framed gold record of "Abbey Road," the one John Lennon owned, the one he snagged from another collector in 1979, is missing. The converted stone house in Havertown, headquarters of his two-year-old rock collectibles company, Musicom International, is being renovated. That gold record is probably just hidden behind one of the piles of papers or pictures or record and videos. But then again . . . As a muttering Somach pokes among the clutter, it's easy to view this scene as borderline symbolic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1994 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The brainstorm came one night two years ago as he was watching a TV home- shopping show. "There was Mickey Mantle holding up an autographed baseball, selling it for $295," recalls Denny Somach, the onetime WYSP-FM (94.1) jock who's since become an independent radio producer, author and agent for John DeBella. "I looked at him and said to myself, 'That's a great idea, sports memorabilia.' But I also knew that more people in the world know who Mick Jagger and Paul McCartney are than Mickey Mantle.
NEWS
July 13, 1992 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Above all, I owe you, the listeners, a great debt of gratitude that I cannot repay," said Bill Campbell, choking back the emotion. "Good day, good sports and God bless you. " With that, the WIP-AM (610) talker - the dean of Philadelphia sportscasters - pretty much brought down the curtain Friday on a career that has spanned almost 40 years. He had intended to deliver a longer goodbye, a longer thank-you to his legion of fans. Unfortunately, his emotions got the better of him. So Campbell cut his own so-long short.
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