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Dental Medicine

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NEWS
March 2, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph W. Foote, 61, of Ardmore, an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, died Friday of lymphoma at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. In a recent tribute to Dr. Foote, a colleague, Peter Quinn, wrote: "During his 30-year career, hundreds of dentists and physicians referred complex patients to him. He was nationally recognized for his particular expertise in microsurgical repair of maxillofacial nerve injuries and was clearly the 'doctor...
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Phoebe Starfield Leboy, 75, of Narberth, a groundbreaking academic activist who retired in 2005 as a professor at the School of Dental Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, died of Lou Gehrig's disease on Saturday, June 16, at her home. She was chair of Penn's Faculty Senate in 1981-82 and chair of the biochemistry department at the dental school from 1992 to 1995. In retirement, she was the national president in 2008-09 of the Association for Women in Science. Three of her Penn faculty colleagues, Sherri Adams, Susan Margulies, and Susan Volk issued an appreciation upon her death, which recalled her arrival on the faculty in 1967.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dental pioneer Samuel R. Rossman, 85, an endodontist and a devoted family man and enthusiastic traveler, died yesterday at his home in Wyncote. Dr. Rossman, a Philadelphia native, graduated from Temple University's School of Dental Medicine in 1933 and set up practice in South Philadelphia. He was attached to the British Eighth Army between 1942 and 1944 during World War II. He was a captain, and cared for the teeth of 1,200 soldiers with captured German equipment and an airplane pilot's seat for a dental chair.
NEWS
January 20, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raymond Fonseca, 40, a University of Michigan professor and an expert on oral surgery, has been named dean of the University of Pennsylvania's School of Dental Medicine. Fonseca, who will assume the post July 1, will be the first black dean of the school. He replaces Malcolm Lynch, who has served as acting dean since November 1987. The dental school, which has a $24.4 million annual budget, enrolls 371 students and has 58 full-time faculty members. Founded in 1878, it is the nation's third-oldest dental school.
NEWS
April 17, 1992 | By Rose Simmons, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ford W. Stevens, 85, a dentist and inventor of the gold acrylic tooth crown, died Monday at St. Mary Hospital in Langhorne. Dr. Stevens had a general dental practice in Center City for 50 years, until his retirement in 1982. He invented the gold acrylic crown in 1946, after having experimented with acrylic plastic while in the Army during World War II. He was a major in the U.S. Army dental corps. He returned to Philadelphia after the war and in 1959 founded the Pennsylvania Academy of General Dentistry.
NEWS
July 8, 2004 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Center City periodontist Leonard Abrams, 73, was not biking miles and miles with a group of his beloved friends who called themselves the AKs, after a Yiddish term for old-timers, he was scuba diving, skiing, or teaching and practicing dentistry. Hours after cycling 35 miles, Dr. Abrams died Tuesday of heart failure at Temple University Hospital. Philanthropist Stanley Tuttleman, after whom the IMAX theater at the Franklin Institute is named, said: "Leonard created a new life for me at 69 when he introduced me to biking in 1989.
NEWS
April 25, 1990 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Dr. Bruce Kyle DeMartino, a dentist who broke new ground in the field of dental anesthesiology, died April 18. He was 50 and lived in South Philadelphia. From 1975 until his health began to fail about three years ago, DeMartino's practice, Anesthesia Associates Ltd., was located in the Medical Arts Tower at 16th and Walnut streets. He came to Philadelphia after graduating from Emory University School of Dentistry in Atlanta. He began his career as an instructor on fixed partial prosthetics at Temple University, where he returned years later as a lecturer.
NEWS
August 8, 1999 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Benedict Kimmelman, 84, a dentist for 62 years who made house calls to his homebound patients, died of heart failure Thursday at his home in Melrose Park. Dr. Kimmelman was characterized by his family as a socially responsible person, whether it was treating patients at home or comforting fallen comrades in war. For the last 25 years of practice, which lasted until illness sidelined him in January, he packed his special kit and headed for homes of patients unable to visit his Center City office.
NEWS
February 19, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dr. Bertha Eastwood Ashworth, 91, of the Pennswood Village retirement community in Middletown Township, a retired orthodontist, died Wednesday at the community's health-care center. Dr. Ashworth was born in Weldon, now known as Glenside, and graduated from Abington High School in 1922. She then graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, the University of Michigan Dental School, and the Dewey School of Orthodontics at Columbia University. Before her 1980 retirement, she maintained a private practice for many years in the Germantown section of Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
In 1977, when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that professional corporations could advertise, Dr. Bertram Lurie spotted the opportunity that led him to his post as director of a $5-million-a-year, low-cost, dental brace chain, The Orthodontist. "I was a dentist with a small private practice in Hatboro and Northeast Philadelphia, when the court opened the door to marketing," Lurie recalls. The lowering of the advertising barrier, plus changes in dental techniques and the technology for straightening teeth made it practical for orthodontists to have bigger practices, Lurie realized.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1988, Dr. Edward G. Holteen flew his single-engine plane to Jamaica, on a trip that was far from a vacation. The Fort Washington dentist was flying with another dentist and Dr. Holteen's wife, Sylvia, who recalled that the six-seater plane was packed with dental supplies. The Holteens drove to a town in the hills, the other dentist went to another remote location, and, for a week, each ran a free dental clinic. Her husband's arms "at the end of the week were very stiff and sore," his wife said.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Phoebe Starfield Leboy, 75, of Narberth, a groundbreaking academic activist who retired in 2005 as a professor at the School of Dental Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, died of Lou Gehrig's disease on Saturday, June 16, at her home. She was chair of Penn's Faculty Senate in 1981-82 and chair of the biochemistry department at the dental school from 1992 to 1995. In retirement, she was the national president in 2008-09 of the Association for Women in Science. Three of her Penn faculty colleagues, Sherri Adams, Susan Margulies, and Susan Volk issued an appreciation upon her death, which recalled her arrival on the faculty in 1967.
NEWS
June 8, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George E. Monasky was a Navy dentist in Hawaii in 1962 when he met his future wife, an Army nurse. Learning how to anesthetize, he had given an especially good dose to one patient. "My mother was a recovery room nurse," their daughter Ann said, and until the patient regained consciousness, "my mom had to stay there. So they had an hour or two to talk and get to know one another. " A 1963 marriage followed. "Most people meet in the States and honeymoon in Hawaii," their daughter said.
NEWS
August 24, 2011 | By Juliana Schatz, Inquirer Staff Writer
When poverty and drought make water inaccessible, when bullets fly in the night sky, people don't think much about oral health. But as the global health community accepts how essential the mouth is to a sound body - mere cavities can cause serious infections and malnutrition - new initiatives are being proposed to bring help to the areas most in need. The Alliance for Oral Health Across Borders is still in its infant stages and has yet to secure funding, but 100 dentists, academics, and industry leaders from around the globe gathered at Temple University earlier this month to sign their inaugural charter.
NEWS
July 17, 2011 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not many dental students are hounded by paparazzi. Then there's Ashley Hebert. "They wait outside my apartment for when I leave in the morning and they wait outside school for when I go home," says the petite 26-year-old, who has almost completed her degree at the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine. Hebert has become a tabloid obsession because of her emotional turn as the queen bee on the current season of The Bachelorette (Mondays, 8 p.m., 6ABC)
NEWS
March 2, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph W. Foote, 61, of Ardmore, an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, died Friday of lymphoma at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. In a recent tribute to Dr. Foote, a colleague, Peter Quinn, wrote: "During his 30-year career, hundreds of dentists and physicians referred complex patients to him. He was nationally recognized for his particular expertise in microsurgical repair of maxillofacial nerve injuries and was clearly the 'doctor...
NEWS
July 21, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sheldon Rovin, 76, of Wynnewood, an innovative educator who held combined appointments in the School of Dental Medicine and the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania, died July 11 of cancer at home. Dr. Rovin was former chairman of the department of dental-care systems at the dental school; director of the health-care executive management programs at Wharton; and director of Penn's Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics. A specialist in the application of systems thinking, Dr. Rovin was a philosopher who believed that everything interacts and nothing works in a bubble, said his wife, Nancy Gold Rovin.
NEWS
November 13, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anthony A. Vito, 83, of Ambler, professor emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, died of heart failure Monday at Sunrise Assisted Living in Dresher. Dr. Vito joined the dental school's faculty in 1957 and retired 45 years later. Besides teaching thousands of students, he conducted research, including a study to improve quality in dental clinics, and served as associate dean of clinical affairs from 1970 to 1980. Dr. Vito graduated from South Philadelphia High School, where he was class president.
NEWS
July 8, 2004 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Center City periodontist Leonard Abrams, 73, was not biking miles and miles with a group of his beloved friends who called themselves the AKs, after a Yiddish term for old-timers, he was scuba diving, skiing, or teaching and practicing dentistry. Hours after cycling 35 miles, Dr. Abrams died Tuesday of heart failure at Temple University Hospital. Philanthropist Stanley Tuttleman, after whom the IMAX theater at the Franklin Institute is named, said: "Leonard created a new life for me at 69 when he introduced me to biking in 1989.
NEWS
January 21, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carol Bonjernoor Cooper, 56, of Willistown Township, a University of Pennsylvania dental school administrator who loved to sail, died in her sleep Friday at her home. The cause of death was undetermined pending results of autopsy tests. Mrs. Cooper's husband, Dick, taught her to sail after they were married. "She learned out of fear," he said. "When the boat was tipping wildly, she knew she had to do something. " The couple had sailed on the Chesapeake since moving to the Philadelphia area in 1977.
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