CollectionsDental Plan
IN THE NEWS

Dental Plan

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 23, 1998 | by Julie Knipe Brown, Daily News Staff Writer
Don't call him snaggle-toothed anymore. Steve Brookens, the TWU labor leader who used his rumpled, toothless, working-man image to set him apart from the slick, buttoned-down SEPTA suits fighting for TV spin time during the recent SEPTA strike, has added a little spit & polish to his heavyweight boxer face: A brand new set of teeth. But no need to worry that his new pearly whites will hurt his tough-guy image, Brookens says. "It'll enhance it," he says, sitting in his office yesterday, chain-smoking as he discussed his political future.
NEWS
January 7, 1994 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The New Jersey Insurance Department said yesterday that it had granted Montgomery County Commissioners Chairman Mario Mele's dental HMO a full license renewal extending through June. "We did require them to make some changes, and there were some concerns," said Peter Camerano, a department spokesman. "But as we stand now, everything is in order and we're satisfied. " Mele is president and majority owner of Dental Delivery Systems Inc., a Glenside-based managed-care dental plan whose largest clients are two North Jersey supermarket workers' unions.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Health Corp. of America, a health insurance firm based in Wayne, has launched a prepaid dental insurance policy that individuals can buy through their employers - a sort of HMO for teeth. Bill Camp, vice president of marketing for the plan, said the dental maintenance organization is the first of its kind in this area. For Health Corp., the dental plan marks a partial return to the company's roots. When the firm was founded in 1972, its sole program was a prepaid dental plan.
NEWS
April 21, 1988 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
Neither threats nor decisions were made last night when about 130 people, most of them school staff members, attended a Pitman school board meeting to protest their prolonged contract negotiations. "After five meetings with the board, we are at an impasse in our negotiations," said the lone speaker from the audience, Carol Fox, president of the 150-member Pitman Education Association. Board President Kathleen W. Benash said the two sides entered mediation last week through the state's Public Employees Commission.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | By Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer
Earl Stout has beaten a federal rap before. In fact, when the U.S. attorney's office charged him in 1980 with racketeering, extortion and mail fraud, Stout didn't just beat the charges. He trounced them so soundly that the trial judge said prosecutors failed to even prove that a crime had been committed, let alone that Stout had done it. The judge acquitted Stout without even letting jurors hear the union boss' defense. Stout turned around and stuck taxpayers with part of the bill for his successful defense, estimated to have approached $100,000.
NEWS
April 3, 1990 | By Gary Cohn, Inquirer Staff Writer
The jury selection process began yesterday in the U.S. District Court trial of Earl Stout, the former labor leader who is charged with stealing nearly $1 million from the municipal-workers' union he headed for 13 years. A pool of potential jurors filled out questionnaires, but no jurors were selected. The questionnaires sought information on the potential jurors' backgrounds and beliefs and asked whether they personally knew Stout, his three co- defendants or any of the possible witnesses in the case.
NEWS
September 30, 1994 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
Is it a conflict of interest to ask doctors and dentists who participate in a union benefit plan for donations to a candidate in a union election? "Only if you're clinically paranoid," said Capt. Rich Costello at a campaign fund-raiser last night for his bid for president of the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5 in the Oct. 4 election. "It's outright wrong," says attorney Samuel C. Stretton, known as "Mr. Ethics," and an adviser to Costello's opponent, Sgt. Louis Campione.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | By Charlie Frush, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Edgewater Park Township Committee is to consider approval of a new two- year contract with the township police department at tonight's regular monthly meeting at the muncipal building. The tentative agreement reached in the last two weeks calls for a 5 percent wage increase this year and 6 percent next year, plus the institution of a dental plan for the officers. D. Robert Heal, township administrator, said that the Edgewater Park Township Police Association already had approved the contract and that the Township Committee indicated at a work session last week that it would approve the pact tonight.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
After more than a month of working without a contract, teachers in Lumberton Township are still negotiating with the board of education for a multi-year pact that would include pay and benefit increases. A two-year contract between the teachers and the district expired June 30, and negotiations between the two sides have not resulted in either group's "coming closer to making a settlement," according to Betsy Cella, president of the Lumberton Township Education Association. A mediation session with the Public Employee Relations Commission last Thursday failed to produce an agreement between the two sides, she said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 12, 2013 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The guard raised the wooden gate at the entrance to the NovaCare Complex on Thursday morning and a car slid inside the grounds carrying former Bears head coach Lovie Smith to another of the interview sessions that have so far defined the Eagles' offseason. As far as we know, Smith was the seventh candidate to replace Andy Reid to be interviewed by owner Jeffrey Lurie, team president Don Smolenski, and general manager Howie Roseman. His meeting followed ones with Bill O'Brien, Mike Nolan, Keith Armstrong, Chip Kelly, Mike McCoy, and Brian Kelly, and precedes ones, if they take place as expected, with Jay Gruden, Gus Bradley, and Bruce Arians.
NEWS
May 7, 2003 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Steve Grant Brookens, 54, who grew up in a tough section of West Philly and in 1998 harnessed that toughness to lead SEPTA's largest union during a crippling 40-day strike - an action that years later contributed to his being forced out as president of the local by a federal judge - has died. Mr. Brookens died Thursday at his Fern Rock home of complications from a kidney transplant, his family said. He had been on dialysis since August 2000, and in January underwent the transplant.
NEWS
February 28, 1999 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
During 19 1/2 hours of line-by-line budget-cutting - nearly $1.2 million worth of reductions - council members stumbled upon a potential budget buster. They learned that seven long-gone employees still were protected under the township's health-insurance plan. The group included a former mayor and committee member - holdovers from the days when the township was governed by a committee. "There's no rhyme or reason why they should be insured by this township," said council president Dawn Robertson, who is a certified public accountant.
NEWS
September 23, 1998 | by Julie Knipe Brown, Daily News Staff Writer
Don't call him snaggle-toothed anymore. Steve Brookens, the TWU labor leader who used his rumpled, toothless, working-man image to set him apart from the slick, buttoned-down SEPTA suits fighting for TV spin time during the recent SEPTA strike, has added a little spit & polish to his heavyweight boxer face: A brand new set of teeth. But no need to worry that his new pearly whites will hurt his tough-guy image, Brookens says. "It'll enhance it," he says, sitting in his office yesterday, chain-smoking as he discussed his political future.
NEWS
September 30, 1994 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
Is it a conflict of interest to ask doctors and dentists who participate in a union benefit plan for donations to a candidate in a union election? "Only if you're clinically paranoid," said Capt. Rich Costello at a campaign fund-raiser last night for his bid for president of the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5 in the Oct. 4 election. "It's outright wrong," says attorney Samuel C. Stretton, known as "Mr. Ethics," and an adviser to Costello's opponent, Sgt. Louis Campione.
NEWS
January 7, 1994 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The New Jersey Insurance Department said yesterday that it had granted Montgomery County Commissioners Chairman Mario Mele's dental HMO a full license renewal extending through June. "We did require them to make some changes, and there were some concerns," said Peter Camerano, a department spokesman. "But as we stand now, everything is in order and we're satisfied. " Mele is president and majority owner of Dental Delivery Systems Inc., a Glenside-based managed-care dental plan whose largest clients are two North Jersey supermarket workers' unions.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
After more than a month of working without a contract, teachers in Lumberton Township are still negotiating with the board of education for a multi-year pact that would include pay and benefit increases. A two-year contract between the teachers and the district expired June 30, and negotiations between the two sides have not resulted in either group's "coming closer to making a settlement," according to Betsy Cella, president of the Lumberton Township Education Association. A mediation session with the Public Employee Relations Commission last Thursday failed to produce an agreement between the two sides, she said.
NEWS
April 3, 1990 | By Gary Cohn, Inquirer Staff Writer
The jury selection process began yesterday in the U.S. District Court trial of Earl Stout, the former labor leader who is charged with stealing nearly $1 million from the municipal-workers' union he headed for 13 years. A pool of potential jurors filled out questionnaires, but no jurors were selected. The questionnaires sought information on the potential jurors' backgrounds and beliefs and asked whether they personally knew Stout, his three co- defendants or any of the possible witnesses in the case.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | By Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer
Earl Stout has beaten a federal rap before. In fact, when the U.S. attorney's office charged him in 1980 with racketeering, extortion and mail fraud, Stout didn't just beat the charges. He trounced them so soundly that the trial judge said prosecutors failed to even prove that a crime had been committed, let alone that Stout had done it. The judge acquitted Stout without even letting jurors hear the union boss' defense. Stout turned around and stuck taxpayers with part of the bill for his successful defense, estimated to have approached $100,000.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|