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NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By Kathleen Nicholson Webber, For The Inquirer
Aside from a colorful stack of magazines, a TV in the corner, and a touch of Muzak for ambience, doctors' offices have never been known for their design IQ. In fact, the nicest thing you might call them is, well, sterile. And although hospitals have invested in good design for many years now, individual medical professionals are giving aesthetics a second opinion, too, recognizing that a well-designed space can calm nerves and ease anxiety - as well as attract new patients. That means considering an MRI patient's point of view (and installing LED lights on the ceiling for entertainment)
NEWS
April 21, 2011
An Easton, Pa., man was charged with endangering his 14-year-old son, who used pliers to yank two teeth from his mouth because his father would not take him to a dentist, police said Wednesday. For several months, Francisco Torres, 40, ignored his son's complaints about his teeth, said Detective Chris Miller. After his son pulled the teeth out in January, Torres allegedly still refused to take his son to a dentist. The teen eventually told someone about his problem and authorities were notified, Miller said.
NEWS
April 20, 2011
An Easton, Pa., man was charged with endangering his 14-year-old son, who used pliers to yank two teeth from his mouth because his father would not take him to a dentist, police said Wednesday. For several months, Francisco Torres, 40, ignored his son's complaints about his teeth, said Detective Chris Miller. After his son pulled the teeth out in January, Torres allegedly still refused to take his son to a dentist. The teen eventually told someone about his problem and authorities were notified, Miller said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2011
DEAR ABBY: I work in a dental office. My boss (the doctor) and his assistant have a problem keeping their pants up. Every time either of them reaches for something or, God forbid, bends over - they flash their backsides. It's just bad, and both of them are pretty good-sized men. My boss is the kindest, most generous person I know. But frankly, this is an embarrassment for patients and co-workers alike. Something has to be done. Any suggestions to help us with this problem would be greatly appreciated.
NEWS
April 6, 2011
Dr. David A. Gerace, 52, of Drexel Hill, a dentist, died of leukemia Saturday, April 2, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Gerace practiced in Drexel Hill for more than 20 years and, since 2005, also shared a practice in Jennersville. "His offices were his second homes and he treated his staff and patients like family," his wife, Noreen Gerace, said. A native of Drexel Hill, Dr. Gerace graduated from Cardinal O'Hara High School in Springfield. He earned a bachelor's degree from St. Joseph's University and a dental degree from Temple University.
NEWS
February 16, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cecil Parker is blessed with a stunning smile, and because that toothiness is integral to his stage appeal, the 39-year-old singer from Old City signed up early when he heard the mobile dentists were rolling into town. Parker got X-rays, a cleaning, and several fillings fixed on a recent Friday morning when California-based dentist Elliot Schlang and his team of traveling technicians came to Philadelphia at the behest of MusiCares, the national nonprofit arm of the Grammys. The annual Grammy Awards were just bestowed Sunday.
NEWS
February 3, 2011
Cletus M. Bonds III, 61, of Lionville, a dentist, died of a heart attack Sunday, Jan. 31, at Chester County Hospital. Dr. Bonds grew up in Alabama and Kentucky, and earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Kentucky. He earned a dental degree from the University of Louisville, where he met his future wife, Ellen Ginter, who was an undergraduate. After serving in the Navy in California, Dr. Bonds established a dental practice in Lionville in 1980. Besides maintaining his practice, he was chief of the clinical dental service at Brandywine Hospital for the last 27 years.
NEWS
January 31, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
THE PRETTY little girl fell for one of the ruses that sex offenders use to lure their prey into the horror of their creepy passions. Jesse K. Timmendequas, a convicted sex offender, told the 7-year-old girl who lived across the street from him in Hamilton Township, N.J., that he wanted to show her a puppy. Megan Kanka went into the man's house on that warm Friday night in June 1994 to see the nonexistent puppy and was brutally raped and savagely murdered. Sometime during the attack, the feisty little girl managed to bite Timmendequas on his right hand with enough force that it was still swollen when police questioned him. That bite mark became a crucial piece of evidence at Timmendequas' trial when forensic dentist Haskell Askin demonstrated to a Mercer County jury how the bite mark was made by Megan's teeth.
NEWS
January 30, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
With more than a dozen television shows featuring forensic science, lab work involving the deceased has become a fantasy career choice for many people. Haskell Askin's job certainly would have appealed to CSI and Forensic Files fans. Among his many high-profile cases, Dr. Askin identified 7-year-old Megan Kanka's bite mark on the man who had raped and killed her in 1994 in Hamilton Township, N.J., leading to Jesse Timmendequas' conviction and contributing to the passing of the state's Megan's Law. He also helped identify victims of massive tragedies: the 1985 MOVE bombing, the 1984 fire at Six Flags Great Adventure, 9/11, and Hurricane Katrina.
NEWS
November 29, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
BOB GALLAGHER was a dentist with a difference. Long before it became common dental practice, he emphasized prevention and good nutrition for his patients and was among the first to have hygienists on his staff. He also practiced restorative dentistry when it was not often done, and he believed in keeping himself educated on the latest developments in the field. Dr. Robert F. Gallagher, who practiced dentistry in Chestnut Hill for 60 years and was an Army Air Corps veteran of World War II, during which he flew supply planes over the "hump" in the China-Burma-India theater, died Nov. 17 of heart failure.
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