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Dentistry

NEWS
May 8, 1989 | By Hank Klibanoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Isadore Cohen, 85, who practiced dentistry in the Oxford Circle area for 55 years, died Saturday at Jeanes Hospital. "Every patient he had was his friend," said his daughter Gloria Bader of Silver Spring, Md. "He loved being a dentist. He just loved it. That was part and parcel of who he was. " A Philadelphia native, Dr. Cohen had other passions, she said. He was a founding member of Temple Sholom, at Roosevelt Boulevard and Large Street, and was active in many of its organizations and programs.
NEWS
January 14, 1997 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carlos Weil Sr., 84, of West Chester, a retired dentist, died Saturday at Bryn Mawr Rehabilitation Hospital in Malvern. Dr. Weil practiced dentistry on Shadeland Avenue in Drexel Hill from 1939 until retiring in 1985. From 1948 to 1965, he worked part-time while serving as professor and chairman of the department of operative dentistry at Temple University. Dr. Weil, who was born in Philadelphia, graduated from Upper Darby High School in 1930 and from Duke University in 1934.
NEWS
November 5, 1991 | By Peter Landry, Inquirer Staff Writer
James A. Milanesi, 79, a pioneer in reconstructive dentistry who practiced 56 years on Torresdale Avenue in Northeast Philadelphia, died of pancreatic cancer Friday at his home in Abington. A man of humor and humanity, Dr. Milanesi loved jazz and opera and golf and books, but it was his work "that was his life expression," according to his daughter, Linda Milanesi. He was still seeing patients as recently as three weeks ago, and to the end, found that his specialty "kept him intellectually challenged and emotionally stimulated," his daughter said.
NEWS
June 8, 1994 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
THE PRU-BACHE MURDER Jeffrey Taylor HarperCollins / $23 In the mid-1980s, before Ronald Reagan's booming economy turned into George Bush's bust, all things financial seemed within reach. Junk bonds made possible goldfish-swallowing-the-whale takeovers. Executive pay rivaled the GNP of some Third World nations. The stock market marched onward and upward. So rosy were the times that even a young immigrant Russian, before he mastered the language, could go from janitor to super stock trader, grossing (in every sense of the word)
BUSINESS
May 2, 2011
Globus Medical Inc. , a privately held maker of spinal implants in Audubon, Montgomery County, has appointed Daniel T. Lemaitre to its board. He is president and chief executive officer of White Pine Medical, a venture-backed medical-device start-up company. Outward Bound Philadelphia, a nonprofit educational organization that provides youth programs and raises scholarship funds to enroll urban Philadelphia students in leadership-building courses, has named Richard Baron to its board.
NEWS
July 21, 1989 | By Frank Lewis, Special To the Inquirer
Frederick P. Cornell, 66, of Cherry Hill, who practiced dentistry for 35 years before retiring in 1987, died yesterday at Frankford Hospital-Torresdale Campus in Philadelphia. Dr. Cornell, who practiced in Bethpage, N.Y., was a 1950 graduate of Washington University School of Dentistry in St. Louis. He also was a lifetime member of the American and New York Dental Associations. Dr. Cornell was a member of the Cherry Hill Rotary and the Cherry Hill lodge of Brith Sholom. He also was a volunteer at the Jewish Geriatric Home in Cherry Hill.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
A memorial service for U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Paul E. Farrell, 86, who died Friday, Oct. 19, in Virginia Beach, Va., will be held Tuesday, Jan. 29, at Arlington National Cemetery. A 12:45 p.m. service will be followed by burial with full military honors, said his son, U.S. Navy Capt. Paul Farrell Jr. Born in Upper Darby, Adm. Farrell graduated West Catholic High School and La Salle University. He was a Navy hospital corpsman in World War II, then served aboard the USS Fargo.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, Special to The Inquirer
Working with his hands and studying the sciences were youthful pastimes that eventually led Andrew M. Halbert to dentistry. "From junior high school, I was very interested in the sciences," Halbert said. "I enjoyed . . . doing models, balsa airplanes and ships. Those two things, combined with the research I did in the dental field at Villanova," tipped the balance toward the field of dentistry. Halbert, who lives in Havertown, recently opened a practice in advanced restorative dentistry at 234 S. Bryn Mawr Ave., Bryn Mawr.
NEWS
November 29, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
BOB GALLAGHER was a dentist with a difference. Long before it became common dental practice, he emphasized prevention and good nutrition for his patients and was among the first to have hygienists on his staff. He also practiced restorative dentistry when it was not often done, and he believed in keeping himself educated on the latest developments in the field. Dr. Robert F. Gallagher, who practiced dentistry in Chestnut Hill for 60 years and was an Army Air Corps veteran of World War II, during which he flew supply planes over the "hump" in the China-Burma-India theater, died Nov. 17 of heart failure.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camden will administer a new dose of medicine to its students next year. Taking advantage of the city's growing health industry, Camden will start a medical arts high school in the fall of 1994. The new school will be temporarily housed in the nursing school at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden. It will be operated by the school system in conjunction with Lourdes and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ). Eventually, a $2 million facility will be built to house the expected 200- to-300 students on a proposed Urban Clinical Campus, to be developed along Haddon Avenue by Lourdes and UMDNJ.
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