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Deportation

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NEWS
September 28, 2010 | By STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
The man who is a "strong suspect" in a simulated sexual act with a toy dinosaur at a Chester County playground faces deportation to Mexico, State Police say. Guadelupe Paramo-Almanza, 39, is suspected of flashing two teenage girls in Pomeroy Park, Avondale, about 4 p.m. Sept. 19, according to police. Following the lewd gesture, Paramo-Almanza allegedly simulated "a sex act on a dinosaur-shaped playground apparatus," police said. Paramo-Almanza was arrested shortly after, less than a mile away, and was believed to be drunk at the time, according to a state police supervisor who asked not to be identified.
NEWS
July 31, 1988 | By Frank Reeves, Special to The Inquirer
Last month, Assistant District Attorney Joel Goldstein made a promise to the Delaware County jury that convicted Victor Maturo of first-degree murder and sentenced him to life in prison. The South Philadelphia man had been accused of plotting with Thomas S. Vile to murder Vile's former girlfriend. "One day Vile will be caught, and I will go before a jury like this and ask that he be found guilty of first-degree murder and sentenced to death," Goldstein said. Last week, Goldstein came closer to fulfilling his promise when an administrative judge in Toronto ordered that Vile be deported from Canada.
NEWS
February 12, 1988 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
The parents of a Delaware County woman who was slain in the parking lot of her apartment development in December have begun a public-relations campaign to force Canadian authorities to deport the former boyfriend accused of killing her. The suspect, Thomas S. Vile, has been in a Toronto jail since Dec. 5, when he was arrested by Canadian police and held on charges that he did not inform Canadian border officials that he was a convicted felon when...
SPORTS
December 7, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
FIRED ESPN hockey analyst Matthew Barnaby's drunken driving charge jeopardizes an agreement the former NHL player reached to avoid potential deportation following an arrest earlier this year. Erie County (N.Y.) DA Frank Sedita called Barnaby's arrest "a serious matter," and warned it could have consequences on the Canadian's status in the United States because of a previous run-in with the law. The 38-year-old is from Ottawa was fired by ESPN on Monday, a day after being charged with drunken driving near his suburban Buffalo home.
NEWS
December 17, 2010 | By MENSAH M. DEAN, deanm@phillynews.com 215-854-5949
Emmanuel Figueroa, who became the target of vigilante justice after he raped an 11-year-old girl, was sentenced yesterday to eight to 20 years in state prison and five years of probation. Figueroa, 25, will be deported to his native Dominican Republic once his sentence is completed, said Assistant District Attorney Mark Cipolletti. Figueroa, in blue prison clothing, looked straight ahead during his sentencing hearing and barely acknowledged his attorney or the Spanish interpreter who continuously whispered in his ear. In July 2008 he raped the learning-disabled girl after tricking her to come next door to his girlfriend's house on Godfrey Avenue in Lawndale.
SPORTS
March 3, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Colorado Rockies ace righthander Pedro Astacio faces deportation by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service because of his guilty plea to an assault charge. Astacio, from the Dominican Republic, received a two-year deferred judgment Jan. 28 but federal law considers that the same as a conviction. Under federal law, immigrants convicted of domestic violence and other offenses are subject to deportation. "As the facts stand now, the government is saying that Mr. Astacio is deportable in virtue of the domestic violence offense, and we will pursue that," INS district director Joe Greene told KCNC-TV in Denver.
NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fidel Napier made it out of Camden, often called America's poorest and most dangerous city, only to end up in a country where the water sometimes cuts out and he fears for his safety when he leaves the house. Almost six months have passed since federal authorities took Napier out of the Pennsauken home he shared with his wife and three kids, then left him in Jamaica, the country where he was born. Napier came to Camden at age 5 but never became a U.S. citizen. He was deported July 30 because of a 1998 drug conviction that labeled him a high-priority candidate.
SPORTS
February 6, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Because of her life here as a topless dancer and a Christian, deportation to Iran could amount to a death sentence for the woman who falsely accused two Dallas Cowboys of rape, her attorney says. Nina Shahravan, 24, is fighting deportation because of her convictions for perjury and shoplifting. She pleaded guilty last year to a perjury charge in connection with her allegations that she was sexually assaulted by Cowboys players Erik Williams and Michael Irvin. She recanted the allegations and served a jail term for perjury.
NEWS
August 1, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fidel Napier, a Pennsauken man from Jamaica who was targeted for deportation because of a 1998 drug conviction, was forced to return to his native country Thursday, his wife said. Napier, who grew up in Camden, was flown to Jamaica by federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents, said his wife, Kiyonna. Since May, the family had been working to try to prevent his deportation by submitting letters from community members on his behalf, asking local political leaders for help, and appealing to federal authorities.
NEWS
June 18, 2011
A 28-year-old Delaware County woman who faced deportation to her native Guatemala has been given a one-year reprieve by federal authorities. Zulma Villatoro was required to voluntarily return to Guatemala by July 2 or be arrested and expelled. She came to the United States with her mother illegally when she was 14. In 2006, she requested asylum, arguing that Guatemala's gang violence put her in jeopardy as a woman. An immigration judge rejected her argument. Harold A. Ort, a spokesman for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, said in an e-mail Friday: "ICE granted Zulma Villatoro a one-year stay of removal on June 15, 2011.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
Thursday was a bad day for undocumented immigrants, among them Carlos Rojas. In the two decades since he illegally entered the United States from Mexico, Rojas, 44, has made a decent life for himself in South Philadelphia, working as a pastry chef and raising a family - while putting the ever-present possibility of deportation as far from his thoughts as he could. He found hope in a 2014 executive action by President Obama that would have protected him, as the parent of an American-born child, from being sent back to his homeland.
NEWS
June 16, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
Offering a forum on the fate of students, inmates, and undocumented immigrants, Philadelphia City Council heard testimony Tuesday about what witnesses called "the school-to-prison-to-deportation pipeline. " Using the 20th anniversary of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act as a peg, witnesses said the landmark 1996 federal law should be repealed because it removed judicial discretion and due process from the deportation process. While Council has no jurisdiction over federal law, it can advance a resolution asking Congress to act. Councilwoman Helen Gym, who presided at the hearing along with Councilwoman Jannie L. Blackwell, said they would do that.
NEWS
June 4, 2016
By Chally Dang I was deported from Philadelphia in 2011. For the past five years, I've been living in Cambodia, away from my family and young children. I strive to live my life here, but memories of my children, community, and city always take over my mind and heart. Imagine being 34 years old and forced to live without everything that makes life worth living. After the genocide in Cambodia, which killed almost a third of the population, my family escaped to the Thai border, where I was born in a refugee camp in 1982.
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
When the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Monday in the nation's most closely watched immigration lawsuit, Libia Rodriguez will be among the expected thousands of demonstrators at the court's white marble steps. The case, United States v. Texas , could be a life-changer for Rodriguez, 31, an undocumented Mexican immigrant who lives in Coatesville with her husband, also here illegally, and their three U.S.-born children. Depending on the justices' ruling, the couple could put aside their worries of being sent back to Mexico.
NEWS
March 8, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
WHAT NOW - "stay out of jail free" cards for the undocumented? It's not Monopoly, it's Philadopoly. While the feds will be cracking down on so-called Sanctuary Cities, Philadelphia will be pondering a gift card for our illegal "residents. " Testifying recently before a House appropriations subcommittee chaired by Texas Rep. John Culberson, Attorney General Loretta Lynch said the Bureau of Prisons is now required to offer Immigration and Customs Enforcement custody of inmates facing deportation.
NEWS
February 18, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
A federal judge in Philadelphia on Tuesday rejected a request by dozens of undocumented immigrant mothers and children to declare part of the asylum process unconstitutional, a step that clears the way for their deportation to Central America. In a case that advocates say could end up before the Supreme Court, U.S. District Judge Paul S. Diamond declared that the expedited review process that led to their expulsions was not unconstitutional and that such removal decisions are an executive branch prerogative not subject to federal court oversight.
NEWS
January 26, 2016
EVEN Donald Trump isn't crass enough to say the name out loud. But as he campaigns for the GOP nomination for president, Trump continues to pitch an immigration enforcement plan modeled after a 1950s deportation program dubbed "Operation Wetback. " The term is a derogatory reference to Mexicans crossing the Rio Grande. Under the program launched by President Eisenhower, more than 1.3 million immigrants rounded up in the United States were loaded onto trains, buses and planes and deposited deep in Mexico's interior to prevent them from slipping back across the border.
NEWS
November 13, 2015
THIS WILL DRIVE the enablers of the undocumented nuts: On a key "immigration" issue, Bernie Sanders and I hold an identical view - and mine's been on the table for nine years. Bern and Byko - perfect together! Like it or not, "immigration" is part of our national debate and is already part of the presidential debate. I use "immigration" in quotes because I notice the media has all but dropped the word "illegal" when discussing "immigrants" who are here without papers. That is Politically Correct and designed to blur the distinction between legal and illegal behavior.
NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fidel Napier made it out of Camden, often called America's poorest and most dangerous city, only to end up in a country where the water sometimes cuts out and he fears for his safety when he leaves the house. Almost six months have passed since federal authorities took Napier out of the Pennsauken home he shared with his wife and three kids, then left him in Jamaica, the country where he was born. Napier came to Camden at age 5 but never became a U.S. citizen. He was deported July 30 because of a 1998 drug conviction that labeled him a high-priority candidate.
NEWS
August 1, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fidel Napier, a Pennsauken man from Jamaica who was targeted for deportation because of a 1998 drug conviction, was forced to return to his native country Thursday, his wife said. Napier, who grew up in Camden, was flown to Jamaica by federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents, said his wife, Kiyonna. Since May, the family had been working to try to prevent his deportation by submitting letters from community members on his behalf, asking local political leaders for help, and appealing to federal authorities.
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