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Deportation

NEWS
January 31, 2012 | BY JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
YANELLI HERNANDEZ has tried to commit suicide twice and could do so again if she's deported to her home country of Mexico, where she hasn't lived for nine years and no longer has immediate family, immigrant-rights activists say. They point to the November suicide of Joaquin Luna, 18, of Texas, as an example of an undocumented immigrant who killed himself because, advocates argue, he suffered from the pressures of being in this country illegally....
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By David Stringer, Associated Press
LONDON - An extremist cleric described as one of Europe's leading al-Qaeda operatives should not be deported to face terrorism charges in Jordan because of the risk that evidence obtained through torture would be used against him, Europe's highest court ruled Tuesday. After a six-year legal battle, the European Court of Human Rights ruled that deporting Abu Qatada from Britain, where he is in prison custody, would "give rise to a flagrant denial of justice. " Abu Qatada, whose real name is Omar Mahmoud Mohammed Othman, is an extremist Muslim preacher from Jordan who has been described in Spanish and British courts as a leading al-Qaeda figure in Europe.
SPORTS
December 7, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
FIRED ESPN hockey analyst Matthew Barnaby's drunken driving charge jeopardizes an agreement the former NHL player reached to avoid potential deportation following an arrest earlier this year. Erie County (N.Y.) DA Frank Sedita called Barnaby's arrest "a serious matter," and warned it could have consequences on the Canadian's status in the United States because of a previous run-in with the law. The 38-year-old is from Ottawa was fired by ESPN on Monday, a day after being charged with drunken driving near his suburban Buffalo home.
NEWS
October 24, 2011 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is an oddity of the Obama years: A president who wants new pathways to legal residency for millions of undocumented immigrants is deporting them at a record rate. From Oct. 1, 2010, to the end of last month, federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials expelled 396,906 illegal immigrants - the largest number in the agency's history. Annual deportations have increased 400 percent since 1996, with "more than a million people [expelled] since the beginning of the Obama administration," notes a University of California at Berkeley Law School study released this month.
NEWS
October 19, 2011 | By Laura Wides-Munoz, Associated Press
MIAMI - U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Director John Morton said Tuesday that his agency deported nearly 400,000 individuals during the fiscal year that ended in September, the largest number of removals in the agency's history. Morton said about 55 percent of those deported had felony or misdemeanor convictions. Officials said the number of those convicted of crimes was up 89 percent from 2008. Authorities could not immediately say how many of the crimes related solely to previous immigration violations.
NEWS
October 14, 2011 | BY JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
OVER THE PAST several months, the Obama administration has said it would exercise prosecutorial discretion in determining whom it will deport, focusing on undocumented immigrants who are serious threats to the community. But immigrant-rights advocates say this policy shift hasn't been implemented consistently. Yesterday afternoon, they rallied near City Hall for Miguel Angel Orellana Garcia, 24, who was brought here from El Salvador as a child, and now faces a final deportation hearing Oct. 27 in Philadelphia Immigration Court.
NEWS
September 6, 2011
WHEN FACED with violence, victims and witnesses must move quickly to protect themselves, their families and communities. But Philadelphia's participation in a controversial data-sharing program is jeopardizing the ability of some to do that. Philadelphia provides immigration-enforcement agents with real-time access to police arrest records via the Preliminary Arraignment Reporting System. Instant access has instant consequences: People arrested, even by mistake, are immediately subject to detention and potential deportation.
NEWS
September 2, 2011 | By Maryclaire Dale, Associated Press
The Justice Department cannot hold immigrants fighting deportation for years without bail hearings, a U.S. appeals court in Philadelphia ruled Thursday, echoing rulings in two other federal circuit courts. It was unreasonable to detain a Pennsylvania man for nearly three years as he fought deportation to his native Senegal over a 1995 drug case, a panel of judges from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit ruled. "We do not believe that Congress intended to authorize prolonged, unreasonable, detention without a bond hearing," Judge Julio M. Fuentes of Newark, N.J., wrote for the unanimous three-judge panel.
NEWS
August 26, 2011
An armed man strolls through a basketball game, opens fire on the bleachers, injuring six people, one critically. The shooter is still at large. Of the 500 people present at the game, not one has stepped forward with information that might help the police find the shooter. This week's incident, at the Kingsessing Recreation Center, is a discouraging chapter in the city. We are as upset as anyone - including Mayor Nutter, who offered a $20,000 reward for information (215-686-TIPS) - over the irony of violence occurring in a so-called "safe haven" rec center.
NEWS
August 25, 2011 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Outside the Immigration Court building at Ninth and Market Streets on Wednesday, about 100 demonstrators knelt on the sidewalk in memory of recent deportees, whose names they wore on string-and-paper necklaces. It was just one stop in a mile-long walk to increase public pressure on Mayor Nutter to end a program in which the Philadelphia police share the names of the people they arrest - and their country of origin - with federal immigration authorities. Advocates for immigrants say the voluntary agreement, signed in 2008, can result in deportations even when the original criminal charges are dismissed.
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