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Depression

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NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Susan FitzGerald, For The Inquirer
Jaimee Drakewood hurried in from the rain, eager to get to her final appointment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Ever since her birth 23 years ago, a team of researchers has been tracking every aspect of her development - gauging her progress as an infant, measuring her IQ as a preschooler, even peering into her adolescent brain using an MRI machine. Now, after nearly a quarter century, the federally funded study was ending, and the question the researchers had been asking was answered.
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
In some cases, marital fights can escalate into more than temporary hurt feelings. Recent studies show that such fights can sometimes be the root of depression in women. According to research, women who have a history of depression are more likely to develop depression as the result of ongoing conflict with their husbands. Fifty percent of married women who are depressed have marital problems, and half of the women who have marital problems are depressed. Steven L. Sayers, assistant professor of psychiatry at the Medical College of Pennsylvania, is currently seeking couples to participate in a study on negative martial communication and depression in women.
SPORTS
April 26, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Pete Harnisch, who left the New York Mets this month under puzzling circumstances, is being treated for depression and is not sure when he will return to the team. "I've been diagnosed with depression," the pitcher said yesterday in his first public comment on his condition. "It's being treated medicinally and with therapy. " Harnisch, 30, who started on Opening Day for the Mets, said doctors told him that his problem was caused by a chemical imbalance. He said there was "some family history" of depression, but declined to give details.
NEWS
December 29, 1999 | by Catherine Foster
I suspect I have a different relationship with oranges than do most people. My father always placed one in the foot of our Christmas stockings, as was the old Depression-era custom. Then, an orange given for Christmas was a rare and wonderful gift - a burst of sweetness in a grim diet of oatmeal. My father never made a big deal about it, but I think he wanted us to know the shadow that lay behind the sunny, affluent '50s. His father had been the wealthy owner of car dealerships.
SPORTS
May 20, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Terry Bradshaw became one of the best quarterbacks in NFL history while fighting depression. Bradshaw, now a football commentator on Fox, said in an interview with the HBO show "Real Sports" that he has had depression since he was 18. The show's first airing is tonight at 10 o'clock. He was a No. 1 pick out of Louisiana Tech in 1970 and won four Super Bowls with the Pittsburgh Steelers. "I am happy that I had the courage to get help," Bradshaw said. "That's a big step because I'm a man. Men don't get depressed.
NEWS
December 1, 1990 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Arthur Miller's The American Clock is subtitled A Vaudeville, and that's pretty much what it is: a vaudeville-style show about the Depression. Yes, about the Depression. Written in the 1970s, and currently offered by Temple University Theater, the play intersperses skits about the effect of the Depression - on Americans in general and on one family in particular - with song-and-dance numbers incorporating the popular songs of the day. The skits, for the most part, are pretty grim.
NEWS
September 18, 1988 | By Frank Reeves, Special to The Inquirer
Media Borough Solicitor Paul L. Patchel was suffering from depression when the car he was driving struck and killed two women on U.S. Route 1 in Middletown Township on June 11, his attorney said in a legal brief filed Monday. His mental condition may have caused him to flee from the accident and fail to help the victims, the brief said. Patchel, 37, is charged with vehicular homicide and other offenses, including accidental involuntary death, speeding, reckless driving, failure to stop after an accident and render aid to the victims, and failure to report an accident to police.
NEWS
May 6, 1988 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Wynnewood psychiatrist yesterday told a federal judge that a 4-year-old black child should be moved from his black foster parents and returned to his former white foster parents to help overcome his depression. Marshall Schechter, a member of a panel of psychiatrists who evaluated Raymond Bullard, testified that the boy has been depressed since his separation two years ago from John and Marilyn McLaughlin, a white Northeast Philadelphia couple. The McLaughlins cared for the child for two years and are now seeking a preliminary injunction in U.S. District Court to have him moved to their care and out of the home of the Rev. Willie and Elaine Williams, a black Overbrook couple.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2011 | By TODD MCCARTHY, The Hollywood Reporter
A decorous, respectable adaptation of Sara Gruen's engaging bestseller, "Water for Elephants" would have come more excitingly alive with stronger doses of Depression-era grit and sexual spunk. The 1931 circus setting and a love triangle involving three exceedingly attractive people provides a constant wash of scenic pleasure and the film's fidelity to its source will receive nodding approval from the book's many fans, which should result in solid, if unspectacular commercial results for this Fox release.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paris Jackson 's suicide attempt Wednesday didn't come out of the blue, an Unnamed Source tells People. The late Michael Jackson 's 15-year-old daughter has been suffering from depression for some time. She is now stabilized at an undisclosed Southern California hospital. "Paris has been very, very depressed for a while. She's been throwing fits and tantrums, kicking and screaming and cutting herself," says the Source. Photos recently published in the tabloids show a series of scars on Paris' arms, suggesting she has practiced the self-harm ritual of "cutting.
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NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
Lawyers for two former students, including a 14-year-old girl who committed suicide, sued the $12.3 billion Milton Hershey School on Thursday in federal court here, alleging that they were expelled for depression and having suicidal thoughts. The suits say the school for impoverished children violated a 2012 agreement with the Justice Department to treat disabled students better and seeks unspecified monetary damages and reforms. Abbie Bartels, 14, hanged herself in her home in central Pennsylvania in June 2013 after she was told she could not return to the 2,000-student boarding school for her eighth-grade graduation.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I have a hard time differentiating between enabling and helping my sister. Throughout her adult life, even while she was married, she has never been able to make ends meet. She's single now and in her 50s, a hardworking but underemployed, depressed individual. I have a good job and I feel guilty if I don't help her each month. (She doesn't ask but drops enough hints that I know things aren't going well.) I have suggested repeatedly that she needs to find a better job. I even send her job leads, but I'm not sure she ever applies.
NEWS
March 28, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Exercise has long been touted as a way to alleviate depression. So shouldn't some of our ultimate exercisers - college athletes - be among society's least depressed? Perhaps not. Research now suggests that nearly a quarter of college athletes experience depressive symptoms, a rate thought to be similar to that of their nonathlete peers. The researchers, led by Drexel University's Eugene Hong, a sports-medicine physician and associate dean of primary-care and community health in the College of Medicine, recently completed one of the largest studies yet of depression symptoms in undergraduate athletes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I'm 39 and seven months pregnant with my husband's only child. Since becoming pregnant, I have become somewhat withdrawn due to depression. My doctor prescribed Paxil, but my husband won't allow me to take it. I don't leave the house unless I absolutely need to because he accuses me of cheating on him daily. Two nights ago, he took a single female friend out to dinner, and they were gone for five hours. It hurt my feelings because, in my view, it was disrespectful on both their parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2016
DEAR ABBY: No matter what I do, I am never satisfied. I have a great wife and two great kids, and yet I always feel like I could have done better with my life. I go to work and no matter how hard I work, I feel like I never get recognition for it. When I go out with friends, we have a great time, but I never feel like I am really part of the group. I feel like the outcast who gets invited just so they won't feel bad. I don't know why I feel this way. I do suffer from depression and have spoken to a specialist.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: You've advised in the past that sometimes you owe it to people to let them know what a certain behavior will cost them or what damage they are doing to the relationship. I recall you saying something like that to a woman whose husband was going on a two-week solo vacation. Where do you draw the distinction between that and an ultimatum? I gave my partner an ultimatum about seeking professional help for his depression.
NEWS
January 24, 2016
Q: Is depression associated with aging? A: According to the National Institute of Mental Health, about 18 million Americans live with depression, and more than a third of them are older than 65. But only an estimated 10 percent of those 6 million people receive treatment. Some older adults may feel down or blue from time to time, but that is different from depression. Those living with depression have severe feelings of sadness nearly every day for at least two weeks. Several factors may contribute to depression, including family history, certain chemical imbalances, major life changes, health conditions, abuse of alcohol or drugs, and use of certain medications.
NEWS
January 24, 2016
Patients seeking and undergoing weight-loss surgery were more likely to suffer from depression and binge-eating than the general population - but those with depression often saw their mental health improve after surgery, a new UCLA-led paper shows. The findings, published this month in JAMA, don't establish a causal link between bariatric surgery and improved mental health. But they do reveal a surprising relationship worthy of more study. "Although our results should not be interpreted as indicating that surgery is a treatment for depression, severely obese patients with depression may gain psychological benefits" along with the physical benefits of surgery, the authors wrote.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2016 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
From the time she was 5 or 6, Susan knew she wanted to be a lawyer. She was equally certain she wanted to be a mother. But in the darkest and most turbulent times of her life, she didn't think either of those dreams was possible. By the time she was in college, Susan had twice attempted suicide; in law school, she developed severe anxiety and later was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. She grew paranoid; she yanked out her fingernails and toenails. Finally, in desperation, she checked herself in to a psychiatric ward.
NEWS
December 13, 2015 | By Sarah Whitman, M.D., For The Inquirer
When athletes suffer an injury, it's not just the body that takes the hit. Athletes' psyches can also suffer. What is it about physical injuries that can lead to depression? Losing something you enjoy. Most athletes love the sport they play. They love the competition, and because they're good at competing, they love the success they have. An injured athlete may also stop going to practice and games, and be left out of activities with other players. For many athletes, the team is a big part of their social circle, and when that's taken away, it's a loss.
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