CollectionsDepression Glass
IN THE NEWS

Depression Glass

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the exception of the Philadelphia Antiques Show, a showcase of the creme de la creme (story on Page 36), the scarcity of antiques events this weekend is a bit depressing, except for collectors of Depression glass, pottery and china made in this country. These specialists can hope to add to their collections from among the thousands of pieces for sale at the Liberty Bell Glass Club Show and Sale, at the Elverson Fire Company No. 1 hall in Elverson. The selection will focus on American-made items from the 1920s through the 1950s.
NEWS
January 2, 1988 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
If one of your New Year's resolutions is to get into collecting, a sale tonight in central New Jersey may help you live up to it. Starting at 7 in Colt's Neck, Bob and Linda Brenner will sell off about 1,200 pieces from their vast collection of Depression glass, with the help of auctioneer Bob Randolph. Given away in the 1930s as a shopping incentive (sometimes simply to encourage people to attend movies), Depression glass was made by a wide variety of manufacturers. Some were utilitarian, such as Cambridge; others, such as Heysey, produced some art glass.
NEWS
March 16, 2002 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Fragile collectibles, from Depression glass to Hummel figurines, will go on the block during the next few days. Here's the breakdown. The Depression glass will be auctioned by the Diefenderfer Auction Company at 9 a.m. next Saturday at the Denver Fire Company in Denver, Lancaster County, near the intersection of Routes 272 and 222. More than 2,500 lots, all from a single New England collection, will be offered, along with 130 pieces of "Elegant" glassware...
NEWS
February 4, 2001 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The glassware was often given away as promotional gifts, packed with breakfast cereals, or just handed out to customers at gasoline stations and movie theaters. Ray Sharrah, 79, of West Chester, a member of the Liberty Bell Glass Club, said that Depression glass and china evoke memories that make it especially valuable to older people and popular among collectors. "I just love the stuff. My mother had it," said Sharrah, a member of the club since its founding in the mid-1970s.
NEWS
March 30, 2003 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For Shirley Smith, collecting Depression glass is all about happy memories. As a child in the 1930s, she played with a doll-size glass tea set that had a pattern of cherries on it. Through marriage, children, grandchildren and several moves, she held on to the translucent-pink cups and saucers. "My husband went to a Depression glass show in 1989, just out of curiosity, and he came back and said, 'I think you might like this,' " Smith said. He was right, and she started learning about her cherished glass pieces - and buying more.
NEWS
May 30, 1992 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Five sales next week will give bidders an idea of just how varied the world of collectibles has become. At 9 a.m. Monday in Pottstown, for instance, an estate sale will feature such traditional collectibles as dolls and Depression glass, those glassware dishes that used to be given out at movies to spur attendance. But it also will include less conventional items such as pocketknives, razors and corkscrews, one in the shape of a mermaid. The items come from the estate of the late Marion Collins, a well-known resident of Pottstown and a lifelong collector.
NEWS
November 26, 1988 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just as in other forms of retailing, auction houses during the next few weeks will be offering sales specializing in items suitable for holiday gifts. Here are some examples. At 10 a.m. Wednesday, Freeman/Fine Arts of Philadelphia Inc. will offer about 600 lots of collectibles, ranging from Bing & Grondahl Christmas plates and Hummel figurines to a zany assemblage of miniatures, many from a single consignor. Some of these miniatures are shadow boxes, furnished rooms recreating a saloon or general store.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2001 | By STEVE GARY For the Daily News
Veteran auctioneer Eileen Rhoads has been around the auction block for many years. While she brings a high level of energy and enthusiasm to all of her sales, she is not frequently moved to superlatives. But just ask about her "Girlfriends" sale that starts at 10 a.m. Sunday and listen to her gush. The "girlfriends" are two Kimberton, Pa., area women who have devoted 50 years to nurturing their childhood friendship and to collecting child and doll-size things, including furniture and dishes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1991 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
The show to check out this weekend for truly fine antiques is the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania's 30th annual Philadelphia Antiques Show (See story on Page 18). For more casual collectors, the choices range from toys and trains to Depression glass. The Liberty Bell Glass Club Show and Sale of Depression-era glass, china and pottery will be at Elverson Fire Company No. 1, tomorrow from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. About 16 dealers are expected. The fire hall is three miles east of Route 23. Take Exit 22 of the Pennsylvania Turnpike.
NEWS
August 27, 1988 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
A major collection of Lionel standard-gauge model trains, including 17 complete freight and passenger sets, will be offered at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Lansdowne Auction Gallery. The train sets, plus a few miscellaneous locomotives and some O-gauge Lionels, were consigned to the gallery, 12 S. Lansdowne Ave., in Lansdowne, by a well-known collector in Ridley Park. The top item in the sale, a passenger train called the Blue Comet, is likely to fetch between $3,500 and $4,000, according to gallery proprietor Walter Whitehead.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 9, 2007 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Looking for a unique gift this holiday season? Leta Shubin of Bala Cynwyd might have just the thing. Shubin has created the Mad Platter, a playful take on the Mad Hatter from Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Shubin combines vintage china, Depression glass, odd mugs and candlesticks - even martini glasses - into a many-tiered serving tray that looks like sculpture. The platter must not tip over, must appeal to the viewer's imagination, and satisfy her aesthetic sense, the artist said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2007
  All the buzz about the 1600 block of E. Passyunk Avenue makes perfect sense. With a critical mass of destination restaurants like Paradiso, RoseLena's, Cantina Los Caballitos, and the new Chiarella's Ristorante (of Wildwood, N.J., fame), the street is hopping on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday nights. A trickle of new retailers that keep late hours, like Beautiful World Syndicate Records and the 20th Century Cool vintage décor store, adds fun to the after-dinner stroll. (Not to be missed: 20th Century Cool's glowing display of uranium-spiked Depression Glass and its sublime collection of Roseville art pottery.
NEWS
May 29, 2004 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Memorial Day marks the start of the warm-weather auctions that cater to vacation travelers. Here are some sales that are worth the trip, particularly if you are interested in country items and folk crafts. Close to home, at 9 a.m. today and Monday in Worcester, Montgomery County, just west of the intersection of Routes 73 and 363, Hauseman's Auctions will sell blacksmith tools and related items on behalf of the proprietors of the Ironmaster of Center Point, Alma Houpt and her late husband, Harry.
NEWS
March 30, 2003 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For Shirley Smith, collecting Depression glass is all about happy memories. As a child in the 1930s, she played with a doll-size glass tea set that had a pattern of cherries on it. Through marriage, children, grandchildren and several moves, she held on to the translucent-pink cups and saucers. "My husband went to a Depression glass show in 1989, just out of curiosity, and he came back and said, 'I think you might like this,' " Smith said. He was right, and she started learning about her cherished glass pieces - and buying more.
NEWS
March 16, 2002 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Fragile collectibles, from Depression glass to Hummel figurines, will go on the block during the next few days. Here's the breakdown. The Depression glass will be auctioned by the Diefenderfer Auction Company at 9 a.m. next Saturday at the Denver Fire Company in Denver, Lancaster County, near the intersection of Routes 272 and 222. More than 2,500 lots, all from a single New England collection, will be offered, along with 130 pieces of "Elegant" glassware...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2001 | By STEVE GARY For the Daily News
Veteran auctioneer Eileen Rhoads has been around the auction block for many years. While she brings a high level of energy and enthusiasm to all of her sales, she is not frequently moved to superlatives. But just ask about her "Girlfriends" sale that starts at 10 a.m. Sunday and listen to her gush. The "girlfriends" are two Kimberton, Pa., area women who have devoted 50 years to nurturing their childhood friendship and to collecting child and doll-size things, including furniture and dishes.
NEWS
February 4, 2001 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The glassware was often given away as promotional gifts, packed with breakfast cereals, or just handed out to customers at gasoline stations and movie theaters. Ray Sharrah, 79, of West Chester, a member of the Liberty Bell Glass Club, said that Depression glass and china evoke memories that make it especially valuable to older people and popular among collectors. "I just love the stuff. My mother had it," said Sharrah, a member of the club since its founding in the mid-1970s.
NEWS
April 26, 1999 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
W.F. Comly & Son auctioneers will hold a sale on May 11 that can put you in the cafe business. The only thing you'll have to purchase separately is an apron for the barroom and wax for your handlebar mustache. "This is a bankruptcy sale of Lena's Cafe in Cherry Hill with the liquor license, real estate and restaurant equipment to be offered piecemeal, or as an entirety," said auctioneer Steve Comly. Comly, on Boston Street in Kensington, is the oldest auction house in Philadelphia, with a history of public sales dating back to 1834.
NEWS
August 22, 1998 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of summer's better auction traditions will take place this afternoon in Souderton, where the Souderton Mennonite Homes will hold its annual quilt sale. It is one of several country sales today. The quilt auction traditionally offers four dozen or more quilts, some custom-made for the occasion, in the various patterns that are much of the fun of quilting. Today's auction, for instance, features log cabin and wedding ring patterns, as well as a special music quilt made by home supporters Jeanette and Bud Bunny that will go on the block about 2:30 p.m. The auction, being conducted by Alderfer Auction Co., will begin at 1:15 p.m. with a consignment of collectible Winross model trucks, all issued in 1998.
NEWS
July 9, 1994 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With weather this warm and many folks headed for vacation resorts, this is hardly the time for serious auction-going. Fortunately a variety of sales over the next few days - at least two in resort areas - will offer some agreeably light bidding. At 4 p.m. in Royersford, for instance, the Ken Reed Auction Gallery will offer some grand old Lionel standard-gauge trains, including a freight train set in its original boxes. The freight train is from a single local consigner who also is selling off a variety of other toy vehicles.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|