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Derby Winner

SPORTS
May 14, 1992 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Poor Lil E. Tee. There was hardly a soul here to meet him when he stepped off the plane Monday. No television crews and reporters elbowing for position. No banners. No fanfare. Just another horse coming in for Saturday's Preakness at Pimlico, with his trainer, whatshisname. All Lil E. Tee did was win the Kentucky Derby. Beat Arazi, "the horse of the century," by eight lengths. Sent him back to France with his tail between his legs. Beat Casual Lies, the bargain horse of the decade.
SPORTS
May 2, 2013 | Associated Press
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - Trainer Doug O'Neill had a pretty darned good day on two courses. First he birdied the eighth hole during a Wednesday afternoon golf outing at Valhalla, then he aced the Kentucky Derby draw when Goldencents landed in the No. 8 post and was made the 5-1 third choice for Saturday's race. "It should be perfect for him," said O'Neill, who saddled last year's winner, I'll Have Another. "Perfect" was not the way last year's Triple Crown series ended for O'Neill and his colt.
SPORTS
May 10, 2004 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To watch Smarty Jones gallop around a racetrack, flying, his head down, staring straight at a perfect angle . . . he is a natural. If we'd only seen him 10 weeks ago, long before the Kentucky Derby victory on May 1 and Saturday's Preakness Stakes. No matter what type of rein was put on him, Smarty Jones refused to settle down. "He was galloping like - leaping up in the air - he'd want to take off," said his exercise rider, Pete Van Trump. "When you did try to slow him down, then he'd throw his head and jump around and just land wrong on his legs.
SPORTS
May 10, 1996 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
This time, there wasn't even a week's suspense. For the 18th consecutive year, there will be no Triple Crown winner. Kentucky Derby winner Grindstone, who won the most thrilling Derby in 35 years, has been retired to stud after a bone chip was discovered in the knee of his right front leg, the same injury that caused him to have an operation last year. The colt, a son of 1990 Derby winner Unbridled, made just the sixth start of his career last Saturday. Now, just that fast, he's gone.
SPORTS
May 16, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
War Emblem's victory in the Kentucky Derby was not enough to earn him the favorite's role for Saturday's Preakness Stakes. Instead, War Emblem, trained by Bob Baffert, was installed as the 3-1 second choice in the morning line unveiled yesterday by Pimlico oddsmaker Frank Carulli. He made Medaglia d'Oro the 5-2 favorite in a field of 13 3-year-olds entered for the 1-and-3/16-mile Preakness. Medaglia d'Oro, who gets a new rider in Jerry Bailey, was fourth in the Derby but was bumped at the start.
SPORTS
May 4, 1992 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The winner of the 118th Kentucky Derby could just as easily have been racing at Philadelphia Park. When Larry Littman bred Lil E. Tee, he intended to take advantage of the Pennsylvania breeding program. It didn't turn out exactly as he envisioned. Lil E. Tee, the first Pennsylvania bred ever to win the Derby, was foaled at Pin Oak Lane Farm in New Freedom, near the Maryland border south of York. Dr. William Solomon's farm now has the unique distinction of foaling a Derby winner and a Hambletonian winner (Park Avenue Joe in 1989)
SPORTS
May 11, 2006 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All the time, people see the name in the phone book, Fair Hill Condominium Association, and call the office, interested in maybe taking a look at a two-bedroom unit, until someone explains what the place is all about. Most callers have the same response: "Horses?" "We operate under Maryland condominium law," said Sandy Goswell, manager of the Fair Hill training center. "We have bylaws and declarations. Each stall is a condominium unit. It's a little bit strange. " Right now, one of the units (condo fees: $6.50 per day, per stall)
SPORTS
May 17, 1997 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The day of a big horse race is one of the longest in all of sports. It starts with a predawn breakfast and ends with a rack of hay well after dark. All that time for a contest that lasts about two minutes. Except for a bath, a stroll around the shed row and a walk to the paddock, the colts spend the day looking out of their stalls, some seeking attention, some shifting restlessly, some preoccupied in a far-away space that is off-limits to humans. It is such a day here at Pimlico, where 10 3-year-old thoroughbreds are scheduled to run precisely at 5:31 p.m. (Channel 6)
SPORTS
June 11, 1995 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tear up the script! Somebody call rewrite! Hold the curtain! The Belmont Stakes, suffering from crowd-appeal anemia and with its leading man at the barn recovering from a fever, was rescued yesterday by a faithful understudy who has a flair for the dramatic. Kentucky Derby winner Thunder Gulch won the 127th Belmont Stakes with one of his trademark, showstopping performances, turning a stirring homestretch duel with Star Standard into a two-length victory worth $415,440 before a crowd of 37,171, the smallest ever for the third leg of the Triple Crown.
SPORTS
June 6, 1986 | By Don Clippinger, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ferdinand, seeking to win two pieces of this year's Triple Crown, yesterday drew the seventh post position for tomorrow's $564,400 Belmont Stakes. The Kentucky Derby winner, second to Snow Chief in the Preakness Stakes, again will be ridden by Hall of Fame jockey Bill Shoemaker. A field of 10 3-year-olds was entered yesterday for the 118th running of the Belmont, whose 1 1/2-mile distance makes it the toughest test of the Triple Crown series. Ferdinand was listed as the 9-5 favorite for the race.
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