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Derby Winner

SPORTS
May 16, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
War Emblem's victory in the Kentucky Derby was not enough to earn him the favorite's role for Saturday's Preakness Stakes. Instead, War Emblem, trained by Bob Baffert, was installed as the 3-1 second choice in the morning line unveiled yesterday by Pimlico oddsmaker Frank Carulli. He made Medaglia d'Oro the 5-2 favorite in a field of 13 3-year-olds entered for the 1-and-3/16-mile Preakness. Medaglia d'Oro, who gets a new rider in Jerry Bailey, was fourth in the Derby but was bumped at the start.
SPORTS
May 4, 1992 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The winner of the 118th Kentucky Derby could just as easily have been racing at Philadelphia Park. When Larry Littman bred Lil E. Tee, he intended to take advantage of the Pennsylvania breeding program. It didn't turn out exactly as he envisioned. Lil E. Tee, the first Pennsylvania bred ever to win the Derby, was foaled at Pin Oak Lane Farm in New Freedom, near the Maryland border south of York. Dr. William Solomon's farm now has the unique distinction of foaling a Derby winner and a Hambletonian winner (Park Avenue Joe in 1989)
SPORTS
May 11, 2006 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All the time, people see the name in the phone book, Fair Hill Condominium Association, and call the office, interested in maybe taking a look at a two-bedroom unit, until someone explains what the place is all about. Most callers have the same response: "Horses?" "We operate under Maryland condominium law," said Sandy Goswell, manager of the Fair Hill training center. "We have bylaws and declarations. Each stall is a condominium unit. It's a little bit strange. " Right now, one of the units (condo fees: $6.50 per day, per stall)
SPORTS
May 17, 1997 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The day of a big horse race is one of the longest in all of sports. It starts with a predawn breakfast and ends with a rack of hay well after dark. All that time for a contest that lasts about two minutes. Except for a bath, a stroll around the shed row and a walk to the paddock, the colts spend the day looking out of their stalls, some seeking attention, some shifting restlessly, some preoccupied in a far-away space that is off-limits to humans. It is such a day here at Pimlico, where 10 3-year-old thoroughbreds are scheduled to run precisely at 5:31 p.m. (Channel 6)
SPORTS
June 11, 1995 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tear up the script! Somebody call rewrite! Hold the curtain! The Belmont Stakes, suffering from crowd-appeal anemia and with its leading man at the barn recovering from a fever, was rescued yesterday by a faithful understudy who has a flair for the dramatic. Kentucky Derby winner Thunder Gulch won the 127th Belmont Stakes with one of his trademark, showstopping performances, turning a stirring homestretch duel with Star Standard into a two-length victory worth $415,440 before a crowd of 37,171, the smallest ever for the third leg of the Triple Crown.
SPORTS
June 6, 1986 | By Don Clippinger, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ferdinand, seeking to win two pieces of this year's Triple Crown, yesterday drew the seventh post position for tomorrow's $564,400 Belmont Stakes. The Kentucky Derby winner, second to Snow Chief in the Preakness Stakes, again will be ridden by Hall of Fame jockey Bill Shoemaker. A field of 10 3-year-olds was entered yesterday for the 118th running of the Belmont, whose 1 1/2-mile distance makes it the toughest test of the Triple Crown series. Ferdinand was listed as the 9-5 favorite for the race.
SPORTS
December 24, 2006 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lately, the delivery trucks have picked up their visits to the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center, bringing - what else? - Christmas presents for Barbaro. "Big," hospital director Corinne Sweeney said of the increase in shipments for New Bolton's star patient. "Boxes and boxes. The big item is peppermints. " Sweeney pointed to a peppermint wreath in the corner of her office, and Churchill Downs sent a winter blanket for the recovering Kentucky Derby winner. Other fans have written Christmas carols for Barbaro and sent them to New Bolton.
SPORTS
May 6, 1995 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Of all the races in America, by far the hardest to handicap is the Kentucky Derby with its large, immature, unpredictable fields of 3-year-olds. The favorite hasn't won in 15 years. And some years, like this one, it's hard to even find a favorite. Mike Battaglia, the Churchill Downs track handicapper who makes the early line, anointed not one but two favorites this year - the 5-2 California entry of Serena's Song and stablemate Timber Country. And after a crowd of about 130,000 finishes betting the 121st Derby here today, that probably won't change.
SPORTS
May 16, 1998 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forget everything you've heard about today's 123d running of the Preakness Stakes. Start all over. The 2-1 favorite, Coronado's Quest, isn't coming after all. A bruised right hind foot discovered yesterday morning after a gallop sidelined the colt just hours before he was to have boarded a van for a predawn ride to Pimlico Race Track, where the $1 million second leg of the Triple Crown will be run today at 5:27 p.m. That means a new favorite,...
SPORTS
May 4, 1998 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you have children, you know how Eduardo Gaviria feels this morning. His baby won the Kentucky Derby. Bob Baffert may have trained him. Kent Desormeaux may have ridden him. Mike Pegram, who owns a chain of McDonald's in Washington state, may have bought him. But Real Quiet, winner of Saturday's 124th Kentucky Derby, was Gaviria's idea. It was Gaviria, a seventysomething manufacturer of industrial chemicals from Bogota, Colombia, and part-time breeder, who was responsible for bringing the bay colt into the world.
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