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Detection

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NEWS
March 5, 1996 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a reasonable question. "If we can put smart missiles down chimneys in the Persian Gulf War and send the Hubble telescope to see Mars, why can't we see small tumors in women's breasts right in front of us?" That's what Dr. Susan Blumenthal, assistant U.S. surgeon general, wanted to know. Over the past 18 months, what she calls an "odd couple" pairing of CIA spy technology and the U.S. Public Health Service has produced several possible answers that are being tested at several hospitals, including the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Out to help improve the beer-drinking experience, the Philadelphia life-sciences company Invisible Sentinel Inc. has entered into partnerships with four brewing companies for final validation of its Veriflow brewPAL. The technology by the University City start-up claims to be the first to provide same-day detection of pediococcus and lactobacillus, bacteria that attach to grain and can spoil the taste of beer. Last fall, Invisible Sentinel announced a partnership with Victory Brewing Co. in Downingtown to work on validation of Veriflow brewPAL.
NEWS
March 6, 1996 | By Barry Schweid, ASSOCIATED PRESS Michael E. Ruane of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
The Clinton administration sent bomb-detection equipment to Israel yesterday to help intercept terrorists at border crossings. It also alleged that Iran was deeply involved in suicide bombings that have shaken Israel and the Middle East peace process. In approving dispatch of sensitive gear after months of talks with Israel, President Clinton said his aim was to "support the fight against future terrorist attacks, to bring killers to justice, and to rally support for peace in the Middle East.
NEWS
January 18, 1987 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
A state-sponsored program to detect radon gas in Uwchlan Township is expected to begin this week. Township manager Doug Haneux told supervisors at their meeting Monday that the program will involve only those residents living north of Milford Road and west of Route 113, where officials from the state Department of Environmental Resources say they have detected higher-than-normal levels of gamma radiation associated with the radioactive gas. ...
NEWS
May 16, 2000 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Delaware County emergency-response officials are gearing up to handle a biological or chemical weapons attack, should one ever happen. Today, the Delaware County Council is to approve the receipt of $200,000 from the federal Justice Department under a program designed to heighten local preparedness in combating weapons of mass destruction that might be used by terrorists. The grant will pay for purchasing five special hoods and respirators that would protect wearers from biological or chemical agents.
NEWS
September 20, 2005 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Port of Camden has received $932,000 in federal grants that will pay for two state police surveillance boats and a bomb detection dog for the Delaware River Port Authority's canine unit, the state announced yesterday. The two 28-foot state police vessels can house an underwater camera system to scan hulls of ships, bulkheads and dock areas for potential explosive devices, acting Gov. Richard J. Codey said. The boats also will be equipped with advanced infrared cameras for nighttime surveillance.
NEWS
December 24, 1998 | By Frank Greve, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
David Bowman bought wheels for every occasion: a Lincoln Mark VIII, Ford Explorer, Dodge pickup and Mustang convertible. Even Ford Escorts for his children. He dropped $100,000 on rare coins and $12,000 at Victoria's Secret. Staff Sgt. Robert Miller bought a car and a house and wrote big checks to his girlfriend. Robert Burchell redid his weekend cabin, adding a world-class home entertainment center and 250-title adult film library. All, the government says, at taxpayer expense.
NEWS
September 28, 1996 | By Larry Lewis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Camden marijuana dealer admitted yesterday that a real-estate agent in the city helped him spend $115,000 of his drug money in cash amounts smaller than the $10,000 reporting threshold that would have alerted tax agents. The drug seller, Walter Holland, 35, said in federal court in Camden that he conspired with real-estate agent Evelyn Moody, believed to be in her late 50s, to buy big cars and houses with the illegal profits. Assistant U.S. Attorney Paul H. Zoubek said Holland agreed to forfeit his home at 1355 Whitman Ave. in Camden, which had been bought with drug money.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
First it was wine. Then beer. Now juice. University City's Invisible Sentinel Inc., developers of microbial detection tools aimed at preventing spoilage, has now entered a deal to help Netherlands-based Refresco Gerber, a European bottler of soft drinks and fruit juices. Refresco's clients include Ocean Spray, Del Monte and Welch's. Refresco will use Invisible Sentinel's Veriflow ACB technology for rapid detection of alicyclobacillus, a bacteria that produces compounds that spoil juice products.
NEWS
October 10, 1986
The National Rifle Association's political opposition to Rep. Bob Edgar in his campaign for the Senate, on the ground that Mr. Edgar joined with the Fraternal Order of Police and other representatives of the law-enforcement community in opposition to the recently enacted amendments abolishing much of the federal gun control scheme, is only the most recent instance of the NRA, traditionally a law-and-order group, turning its back on law enforcement in...
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NEWS
August 22, 2016
Donald "D.A. " Henderson, 87, an American epidemiologist who led the international war on smallpox that resulted in its eradication in 1980, died Friday at a hospice facility in Towson, Md. The cause was complications from a broken hip, said Stephanie Desmon, the media relations director of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. A self-described "disease detective," Dr. Henderson spent the defining years of his career as an official of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization.
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
Defense lawyers on Monday challenged a series of retired Philadelphia police homicide detectives on why they made Anthony Wright the prime suspect in the 1991 rape and murder of a 77-year-old Nicetown woman. "I was 18 years a detective," responded one of them, retired Detective Frank Jastrzemski. "This is real life, this isn't TV. " The steps that led to Wright's 1993 conviction and life sentence for the slaying of Louise Talley have come into question after new DNA testing undermined prosecutors' original theory in the case.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
Two Philadelphia police officers told a Common Pleas Court jury Monday that the owner of the Oasis strip club and his manager quickly went from purported victims to suspects in the beating of one patron and death of another. Officer Alexander Montes, the first to arrive at the Southwest Philadelphia gentlemen's club on Oct. 16, 2009, testified that club owner Robert Laflar said two men had "jumped him, started fighting, and tried to rob him of his Rolex watch. " Laflar, however, did not look like he had been in a fight, Montes said.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Grace Toohey, STAFF WRITERS
When police arrived to investigate reports of a stabbing at a Franconia meatpacking plant in February 2015, they simply followed the blood. A crimson trail ran through the plant, out a door, and across the snow into a shed. "The trail was pretty extensive," Montgomery County Detective Ed Schikel said. Schikel was among the first witnesses called as trial opened Tuesday in Norristown for the man they found in that shed, Peter Jok Atem. Prosecutors say Atem, 34, stabbed a co-worker, Danny Vasquez, 25, to death with a 41/2-inch butterfly knife.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
Tiffany Floyd stabbed Maya Young this year for two reasons: Both were vying for the same man, and the victim was casting "voodoo spells," a detective testified in court Tuesday. Philadelphia Homicide Detective James Pitts told Municipal Court Judge Teresa Carr Deni that Floyd admitted to police that she stabbed Young in the back and then gave the knife to Jose Pena, telling him: "You got to finish it. You got to kill him. " Pitts, testifying during Floyd's preliminary hearing, said Floyd told detectives that Young was casting spells on her boyfriend, following her around, and harassing her. Assistant District Attorney Chesley Lightsey said Young - a 25-year-old transgender woman known as "Littles," who was born Norman Lindsey Jr. - died Feb. 21 of deep stab wounds in the back and chest that punctured a lung.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
A Philadelphia police detective charged with kicking a man and breaking his right leg will stand trial on aggravated assault and other charges, a municipal judge ordered Friday. Adam O'Donnell, 43, a nine-year member of the force, sat silently during a preliminary hearing as Judge Teresa Carr Deni ruled. Several fellow detectives were in the courtroom in apparent support of O'Donnell. Theodore Life III, 45, testified during the hearing that O'Donnell kicked him in the right knee, fracturing his femur, on Feb. 3, 2015, outside the Special Victims Unit at 300 E. Hunting Park Ave. In addition to aggravated assault, O'Donnell was charged with kidnapping, unlawful restraint, and official oppression.
NEWS
February 25, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Tide gauges show that average sea levels have been steadily rising since the late 1800s, a worrisome trend that scientists blame on emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases. But what about the centuries before then, when those gauges were mostly nonexistent? Part of the answer, a team of researchers reported this week, lies in the salt marshes of South Jersey. In a study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, authors calculated sea levels over thousands of years by analyzing cores of sediment from the salt marshes and 23 other geological sites around the world.
NEWS
February 23, 2016
ISSUE | JUSTICE Trial by media Whatever happened to the legal principle that a person is innocent until proven guilty? A police officer has not had his day in court, yet District Attorney Seth Williams is trying him in the media by calling the incident "a senseless attack" and saying he hopes the detective "understands the severity of his crime" ("Phila. detective charged with breaking man's leg," Thursday). Was a crime committed? Does Williams plan to prosecute the detective "to the fullest extent of the law" on social media and in the newspapers and on TV?
NEWS
February 21, 2016
By Idra Novey Little, Brown. 272 pp. $25. Reviewed by Katherine Hill In Idra Novey's delightful debut novel, Ways to Disappear , language is a fascinating plot all by itself. The novel opens in Copacabana, where celebrated Brazilian writer Beatriz Yagoda is climbing into an almond tree with a suitcase - exactly the kind of vanishing act Beatriz herself might write. On receiving the news in Pittsburgh, Beatriz's American translator, Emma, can't help thinking in Portuguese.
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