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Detection

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NEWS
March 5, 1996 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a reasonable question. "If we can put smart missiles down chimneys in the Persian Gulf War and send the Hubble telescope to see Mars, why can't we see small tumors in women's breasts right in front of us?" That's what Dr. Susan Blumenthal, assistant U.S. surgeon general, wanted to know. Over the past 18 months, what she calls an "odd couple" pairing of CIA spy technology and the U.S. Public Health Service has produced several possible answers that are being tested at several hospitals, including the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Out to help improve the beer-drinking experience, the Philadelphia life-sciences company Invisible Sentinel Inc. has entered into partnerships with four brewing companies for final validation of its Veriflow brewPAL. The technology by the University City start-up claims to be the first to provide same-day detection of pediococcus and lactobacillus, bacteria that attach to grain and can spoil the taste of beer. Last fall, Invisible Sentinel announced a partnership with Victory Brewing Co. in Downingtown to work on validation of Veriflow brewPAL.
NEWS
March 6, 1996 | By Barry Schweid, ASSOCIATED PRESS Michael E. Ruane of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
The Clinton administration sent bomb-detection equipment to Israel yesterday to help intercept terrorists at border crossings. It also alleged that Iran was deeply involved in suicide bombings that have shaken Israel and the Middle East peace process. In approving dispatch of sensitive gear after months of talks with Israel, President Clinton said his aim was to "support the fight against future terrorist attacks, to bring killers to justice, and to rally support for peace in the Middle East.
NEWS
January 18, 1987 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
A state-sponsored program to detect radon gas in Uwchlan Township is expected to begin this week. Township manager Doug Haneux told supervisors at their meeting Monday that the program will involve only those residents living north of Milford Road and west of Route 113, where officials from the state Department of Environmental Resources say they have detected higher-than-normal levels of gamma radiation associated with the radioactive gas. ...
NEWS
May 16, 2000 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Delaware County emergency-response officials are gearing up to handle a biological or chemical weapons attack, should one ever happen. Today, the Delaware County Council is to approve the receipt of $200,000 from the federal Justice Department under a program designed to heighten local preparedness in combating weapons of mass destruction that might be used by terrorists. The grant will pay for purchasing five special hoods and respirators that would protect wearers from biological or chemical agents.
NEWS
September 20, 2005 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Port of Camden has received $932,000 in federal grants that will pay for two state police surveillance boats and a bomb detection dog for the Delaware River Port Authority's canine unit, the state announced yesterday. The two 28-foot state police vessels can house an underwater camera system to scan hulls of ships, bulkheads and dock areas for potential explosive devices, acting Gov. Richard J. Codey said. The boats also will be equipped with advanced infrared cameras for nighttime surveillance.
NEWS
December 24, 1998 | By Frank Greve, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
David Bowman bought wheels for every occasion: a Lincoln Mark VIII, Ford Explorer, Dodge pickup and Mustang convertible. Even Ford Escorts for his children. He dropped $100,000 on rare coins and $12,000 at Victoria's Secret. Staff Sgt. Robert Miller bought a car and a house and wrote big checks to his girlfriend. Robert Burchell redid his weekend cabin, adding a world-class home entertainment center and 250-title adult film library. All, the government says, at taxpayer expense.
NEWS
September 28, 1996 | By Larry Lewis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Camden marijuana dealer admitted yesterday that a real-estate agent in the city helped him spend $115,000 of his drug money in cash amounts smaller than the $10,000 reporting threshold that would have alerted tax agents. The drug seller, Walter Holland, 35, said in federal court in Camden that he conspired with real-estate agent Evelyn Moody, believed to be in her late 50s, to buy big cars and houses with the illegal profits. Assistant U.S. Attorney Paul H. Zoubek said Holland agreed to forfeit his home at 1355 Whitman Ave. in Camden, which had been bought with drug money.
NEWS
October 10, 1986
The National Rifle Association's political opposition to Rep. Bob Edgar in his campaign for the Senate, on the ground that Mr. Edgar joined with the Fraternal Order of Police and other representatives of the law-enforcement community in opposition to the recently enacted amendments abolishing much of the federal gun control scheme, is only the most recent instance of the NRA, traditionally a law-and-order group, turning its back on law enforcement in...
NEWS
July 23, 2002 | By Dan Inbar
The July 4 attack on the El Al counter at Los Angeles International Airport was a reminder that the threat of terrorism is here to stay, and that we are inadequately equipped to fight it. People-screening - searching people for weapons and explosives, even weapons of mass destruction - should be one of our main lines of defense, but it is one of our weakest. It would be best for people to be screened for all possible threats unobtrusively - while waiting in line at the ticket counter or going through passport control.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 22, 2015
*  TRUE DETECTIVE . 9 p.m. Sunday, HBO. Temper your expectations for the show's new season, which carries nearly as much baggage as its characters. Sunday's Season 2 premiere introduces Colin Farrell, Vince Vaughn, Rachel McAdams and Taylor Kitsch as four people whose complicated lives won't be simplified by the murder of a corrupt southern California city's manager. Philly's David Morse guest stars. *  A DEADLY ADOPTION . 8 p.m. Saturday, Lifetime. Are Kristen Wiig and Will Ferrell (pictured)
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
HBO continues its ownership of Sunday nights. Game of Thrones has wrapped up a particularly gruesome fifth season, and Veep and Silicon Valley similarly said their goodbyes for the year. So HBO is introducing three shows to Sunday audiences. These shows - True Detective (9 p.m.), Ballers (10 p.m.) and The Brink (10:30 p.m.) - are not all that dissimilar from their Sunday time-slot predecessors. As was the case last week, these shows include an epic drama and two comedies - a political satire and one that looks at the daily grind of a much-publicized world.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
* TRUE DETECTIVE. 9 p.m. Sunday, HBO. * THE ASTRONAUT WIVES CLUB. 8 tonight, 6ABC. * CATASTROPHE. Amazon Prime Video, tomorrow. * MASTERPIECE: POLDARK. 9 p.m. Sunday, WHYY12. * THE CRIMSON FIELD. 10 p.m. Sunday, WHYY12. * BALLERS and THE BRINK. 10 and 10:30 p.m. Sunday, HBO.   WHAT IF we don't overthink "True Detective" this season? Not only because creator Nic Pizzolatto's already done that for us, but because overthinking feels like the wrong approach to something whose roots are in pulp fiction.
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia prosecutors will formally close their case Monday in the murder trial of a Bucks County exterminator charged with strangling pediatrician Melissa Ketunuti and setting her body on fire. Assistant District Attorneys Jennifer Selber and Peter Lim called their final witness Friday, police Homicide Detective Edward Tolliver, who testified about the five-page confession he obtained from Jason Smith on Jan. 24, 2013. Tolliver was aggressively questioned for almost 90 minutes by defense attorney J. Michael Farrell, who challenged him for questioning Smith for five hours before formally reading Smith his constitutional right to remain silent and have a lawyer, and taking Smith's confession.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer| narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
A MAN STOOD on Mount Ephraim Avenue in Camden clutching an umbrella, unaware that several Philadelphia City Council members were watching him from another part of the city in a dark room full of computer monitors. Council President Darrell Clarke had led the journey over the Ben Franklin Bridge to Camden yesterday morning to check the Camden County Police Department's nerve center, its Real-Time Tactical Operations and Information Center, where a network of cameras and hidden microphones is monitored like something out of a spy thriller.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kate Pelcin and Kristina Griste dipped the Aqua Tweeter into water, and the flood-detection device posted to Twitter: "At least three inches of water. Is your sump pump working?" Last week, the "flood" was just a pool set up in Gavin Speirs' classroom at Downingtown High School West. But soon, Aqua Tweeters are to be set up in flood-prone Downingtown Borough, allowing people to monitor water levels in public places via Twitter. Pelcin, Griste, and classmate Andrew Kim invented the device in Speirs' Introduction to Engineering Design class.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
A gunshot-detection program that Camden police credit for a significant decrease in shootings has drawn the interest of Philadelphia officials, who say they would like to set aside money in next year's budget for the service. The ShotSpotter program - a network of microphones that detect sounds resembling gunfire, triangulate their location, and alert police - has been in use in Camden since 2011. Several members of Philadelphia City Council went to Camden on Monday for a demonstration of the system.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Artist, author, and retired detective Joe Getsinger says Sally Snickers' pigtails point the way to "the bigger story of the King of Cartoons. " While doing research for a soon-to-be-published book, Getsinger found an early iteration of the distinctive Sally character in a 1930s comic strip by Jack Kirby, later the creator of Captain America, the Fantastic Four, and many more. "Sally helped me connect the dots" between Kirby's formative years and his fame, says Getsinger, who discovered the revelatory images within his collection of about 8,000 printing plates.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert L. Tatum Sr., 79, of Camden, who retired in 1992 as a detective lieutenant in the Camden County Prosecutor's Office, died of heart problems Saturday, March 14, at Cooper University Hospital in Camden. Born in Camden, Mr. Tatum graduated from Camden High School in 1954 and earned a bachelor's degree in criminal justice at Glassboro State College in 1981, daughter Donna Drummonds said. He was a Camden City police officer from 1960 to 1977, serving for a time as a detective sergeant, she said.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The filmmakers ask Richard Norcross to pull over at the house where he was shot five times - the house where his younger brother and another law enforcement officer were gunned down 20 years ago. "It's a very eerie feeling," says Norcross, who was a Haddon Heights police detective when Leslie Nelson's bloody rampage made national headlines. Glancing at the innocuous two-story dwelling on Sylvan Drive where his life changed forever on April 20, 1995, Norcross adds, "There are no good memories here.
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