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Detective Comics

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Debuting in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939 (a mint copy will get you $1 million or more today), artist Bob Kane's Batman didn't have the otherworldly powers of DC's big star, Superman, but he did have a cool cowl and cape getup, a nifty alter ego (Bruce Wayne, millionaire philanthropist), and a determination to rid Gotham City of its crooks and goons. Getting his own comic book the following spring, Batman has been with us ever since, with his rogues gallery of neurotic nemeses, his trusty footman Alfred, that Robin kid, and various girlfriends and girl-fiends wondering why Bruce Wayne and Batman are never in the same place at the same time.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1989 | By Barbara Beck, Daily News Staff Writer
There are only clouds in this city. The rain rarely stops. The streets are flooded with litter. Mutant gangs protect their turf by retaliating against innocent bystanders. There is dread along the city's streets. Crime and corruption spread through city hall. Welcome to Gotham City, dark and unfriendly and in decay, home to millionaire Bruce Wayne, a/k/a Batman, fighting crime in a mask and a cape. Crime in the streets? Urban angst? What . . . Gotham City? Or Philadelphia?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2003 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
Let me set the record straight once and for all: The character Robin - Batman's longtime sidekick - is not now nor has he ever been gay (not that there's anything wrong with that). The characterization is not new. Back in 1954, child psychologist Frederic Wertham published a book, "Seduction of the Innocent," that accused comics of being evil. Among other things, Wertham claimed that Robin's bare legs and "discreetly evident" genitals promoted homosexuality. Don't laugh.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2005 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
As "Batman Begins" looks certain to increase the visibility of the second-longest running character in comic book history - Batman debuted in 1939, one year after Superman - it is worth noting that this cultural icon was almost killed at the age of 25! Batman's greatest enemy back then was not the Joker or Catwoman, but anemic fan interest, and he desperately needed a new ally to survive. Irwin Donenfeld, the Editorial Director and Publisher of DC Comics in the mid-1960s, decided to put the character's fate in the talented hands of artist Carmine Infantino.
NEWS
April 8, 2008 | By Jonathan Last
You may not know Jerome Siegel, but you know his work. In 1933, Siegel and his high school buddy Joseph Shuster created Superman. In his first incarnation, Superman was a bald-headed, Depression-era villain bent on world domination. But Siegel and Shuster tinkered with the character until Supes became the hero we know and love: He came from an alien planet, had great strength and speed, was impervious to bullets, could leap a building in a single bound, and was known to the outside world as mild-mannered reporter Clark Kent.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1990 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
If you think that comic-book collecting is confined to adolescent lads with problem complexions and daydreams of glory, you haven't been paying attention. Comic-book publishing has exploded in the last 10 years. Comic retailing requires its own stores, and some do so much business that they can afford to occupy expensive shopping-mall space. For a quick introduction into this world, in which some rare comics sell for prices that might make an art connoisseur blanch, there's Best Film & Video's Comic Book Collector (40 minutes, $19.99)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2005 | By JEROME MAIDA - For the Daily News
AS ONE MIGHT expect of a character that has been around nearly seven decades, Batman has continuously changed and grown. Here's the breakdown by decade. 1930s In 1939, when he first appeared in "Detective Comics" #27, Batman was a character who - in contrast to the moral code he has lived by for the majority of his existence - was not averse to killing criminals. "What you're seeing there is a character in the process of being created," said Dennis O'Neil, who wrote or edited the character's adventures for parts of four decades (1970s, 1980, 1990s, 2000s)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2006 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
Paul Dini has been linked to DC's famed Dark Knight Detective ever since his work on "Batman: The Animated Series," a show Batman fans have long felt was closer to the ideal Batman than either the movies or his recent comics. So when it was announced that Dini would be taking the writing reins on "Detective Comics" with No. 821, expectations were high. Consider those expectations met. Dini's first issue hits the Bats-eye, for various reasons. First, he seems to be putting an emphasis on the aspect of Batman as the World's Greatest Detective, which many writers seem to ignore.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2012 | By Jamie Stengle, Associated Press
DALLAS - The bulk of a man's childhood comic-book collection, including many of the most prized issues ever published, sold at auction Wednesday for about $3.5 million. A copy of Detective Comics No. 27, which sold for 10 cents in 1939 and features the debut of Batman, got the top bid at the New York City auction. It sold for about $523,000 with a buyer's premium, said Lon Allen, managing director of comics for Heritage Auctions, the Dallas-based auction house overseeing the sale.
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NEWS
June 10, 2013
Larry Tye is the author of "Superman: The High-Flying History of America's Most Enduring Hero," now out in paperback (Random House) The comics had never beheld a golden goose like him. By the end of World War II, Superman was the marquee attraction in four separate comic books and shared top billing with Batman in a fifth. Each magazine brought in just 10 cents, but a 1940s dime is today's dollar, and 3.2 million dimes were rung up every month. True Man of Tomorrow addicts could get a daily dose in the funny pages.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Debuting in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939 (a mint copy will get you $1 million or more today), artist Bob Kane's Batman didn't have the otherworldly powers of DC's big star, Superman, but he did have a cool cowl and cape getup, a nifty alter ego (Bruce Wayne, millionaire philanthropist), and a determination to rid Gotham City of its crooks and goons. Getting his own comic book the following spring, Batman has been with us ever since, with his rogues gallery of neurotic nemeses, his trusty footman Alfred, that Robin kid, and various girlfriends and girl-fiends wondering why Bruce Wayne and Batman are never in the same place at the same time.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | By Molly Eichel and Daily News Staff Writer
IN MAY, "The Avengers" made $207,438,708 during its opening weekend. And, so far, it's raked in $1,457,760,486 worldwide since it was released. But it doesn't feel like the movie premiered just a scant few months ago. Why? Because no one is talking about "The Avengers" anymore. If anything, that quaint little film about the bromance of various Marvel superheroes now seems like a distant memory. Iron who? Since we stopped caring about Tony Stark, Captain America, Thor and their sundry friends, moviegoer anticipation has been placed squarely on the shoulders of "The Dark Knight Rises," the third and final entry in the Christopher Nolan-directed trilogy that began with 2005's "Batman Begins" and was followed by 2008's " The Dark Knight . " This time out, unlike the previous movies, Bruce Wayne is competing against several other comic-book-turned-movie properties.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2012 | By Jamie Stengle, Associated Press
DALLAS - The bulk of a man's childhood comic-book collection, including many of the most prized issues ever published, sold at auction Wednesday for about $3.5 million. A copy of Detective Comics No. 27, which sold for 10 cents in 1939 and features the debut of Batman, got the top bid at the New York City auction. It sold for about $523,000 with a buyer's premium, said Lon Allen, managing director of comics for Heritage Auctions, the Dallas-based auction house overseeing the sale.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2010 | By JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
With " Superman " No. 700 marking a rare milestone - only "Action Comics," "Detective Comics" and " Batman " have been continuously published for that many issues - you would think the issue would be jam-packed with epic slug fests, classic villains, etc. However, since the past few years have seen the Man of Steel engaged in universe-shattering battles on an almost continuous basis, DC has chosen to take the special occasion to look at...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2008 | By DAVID TISCHMAN For the Daily News
Criminals are a "superstitious, cowardly lot," according to millionaire Bruce Wayne in Detective Comics #27, published in 1939. That's why he chose the bat as his costumed symbol. But in "The Dark Knight," things are more complicated in 21st century Gotham City, and director Christopher Nolan fine-tunes the character he created in 2005's "Batman Begins. " Gone is the childhood trauma of seeing his parents Thomas and Martha Wayne gunned down in cold blood. "The origin story is a very heavy story, but it very much binds you to the past," Nolan said.
NEWS
April 8, 2008 | By Jonathan Last
You may not know Jerome Siegel, but you know his work. In 1933, Siegel and his high school buddy Joseph Shuster created Superman. In his first incarnation, Superman was a bald-headed, Depression-era villain bent on world domination. But Siegel and Shuster tinkered with the character until Supes became the hero we know and love: He came from an alien planet, had great strength and speed, was impervious to bullets, could leap a building in a single bound, and was known to the outside world as mild-mannered reporter Clark Kent.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2006 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
Paul Dini has been linked to DC's famed Dark Knight Detective ever since his work on "Batman: The Animated Series," a show Batman fans have long felt was closer to the ideal Batman than either the movies or his recent comics. So when it was announced that Dini would be taking the writing reins on "Detective Comics" with No. 821, expectations were high. Consider those expectations met. Dini's first issue hits the Bats-eye, for various reasons. First, he seems to be putting an emphasis on the aspect of Batman as the World's Greatest Detective, which many writers seem to ignore.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2005 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
As "Batman Begins" looks certain to increase the visibility of the second-longest running character in comic book history - Batman debuted in 1939, one year after Superman - it is worth noting that this cultural icon was almost killed at the age of 25! Batman's greatest enemy back then was not the Joker or Catwoman, but anemic fan interest, and he desperately needed a new ally to survive. Irwin Donenfeld, the Editorial Director and Publisher of DC Comics in the mid-1960s, decided to put the character's fate in the talented hands of artist Carmine Infantino.
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