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Detroit

NEWS
July 30, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano and Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
Now that Detroit has filed for bankruptcy, will other financially challenged big cities follow Motown to U.S. Bankruptcy Court to escape some of what they owe? Maybe, but Philadelphia is unlikely to be one of them. Michigan officials wanted their biggest city to go bankrupt. They expect this will enable the city to trim what it has to pay investors who own city bonds, retired police who collect city pensions, and other creditors. "Michigan's antipathy for bondholders is startling," said Matt Fabian, managing director of Massachusetts-based Municipal Market Advisors.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Mark Zandi
Is Detroit's bankruptcy an omen or an anomaly? Will other American cities, such as Philadelphia, eventually go down the same dark financial road? Or is the Motor City's financial crisis an isolated event? Detroit's story is a cautionary tale. The city's economy soared with the advent of the automobile a century ago, making companies such as Ford and General Motors the Apple and Google of their day. The population ballooned, rising to nearly two million after World War II. A city that big requires lots of government services, including schools, police, fire, sanitation, and social services.
NEWS
July 26, 2013
ALTHOUGH a municipality filing for bankruptcy protection is rare, you still ought to be paying attention to what happens to bondholders in the case of Detroit. The city's Chapter 9 filing likely will set some precedents, including how investors and/or their investment advisers view municipal bonds, also known as munis. "I think that the potential risks to the municipal-bond market are serious," said David D. Tawil, co-founder and portfolio manager for Maglan Capital, a New York investment firm that specializes in distressed assets.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT - As the once-proud city of Detroit humbles itself in bankruptcy court, its financial future may hinge on this key question: Is the city obliged to its past? Or can Detroit renege on its promises to thousands of retirees for the sake of its present city services? The legal question at the heart of Detroit's bankruptcy filing has never definitively been answered by the nation's highest courts. But it could become increasingly important as cities from coast to coast are grappling with shortfalls in pension funds that left unchecked could force cutbacks to police, firefighters and other city services.
SPORTS
July 25, 2013 | BY DAVID MURPHY, Daily News Staff Writer dmurphy@phillynews.com
ST. LOUIS - The Phillies will watch former San Francisco Giants closer Brian Wilson in a workout tomorrow in Los Angeles as they continue an attempt to upgrade a bullpen that entered yesterday ranked at the bottom of the National League in most major relief-pitching categories. Wilson was the closer on the 2010 Giants team that defeated the Phillies in the NLCS before beating the Rangers in the World Series. He has not pitched since April 2012, when he underwent Tommy John surgery to repair a torn UCL in his right elbow.
NEWS
July 25, 2013
KICKING the can down the road - delaying action on the hard problem - is one time-honored political strategy. Why do something today when you can wait until you are safely re-elected, or even longer? The bankruptcy of Detroit is proof of the flaw in that strategy. And the lesson we can learn from Detroit, says Jennifer Bradley, of the Brookings Institution, is that "any place that thinks it can kick the can down the road will find the road can drop off abruptly. " Certainly not all of Detroit's problems were of its own making.
NEWS
July 23, 2013 | Associated Press
DETROIT - It wasn't easy making Detroit the largest U.S. city to file for bankruptcy protection, but it was the right decision, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder said yesterday as he, the city's mayor and its emergency manager made the television talk show rounds. Snyder, a Republican, gave his blessing to emergency manager Kevyn Orr's decision to file for bankruptcy for Detroit on Thursday. "We looked through every other viable option," Snyder said on CBS' "Face the Nation. " "The debt question needs to be addressed.
NEWS
July 23, 2013 | By Zachary A. Goldfarb, Washington Post
DETROIT - The battle over the future of Detroit is set to begin this week in federal court, where government leaders will square off against retirees in a colossal debate over what the city owes to a prior generation of residents as it tries to rebuild for the next. Soon after Detroit emergency manager Kevyn Orr and Gov. Rick Snyder approved a bankruptcy filing Thursday, groups representing the 20,000 retirees reliant on city pensions successfully petitioned a county court to effectively freeze the bankruptcy process.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Dan Balz, Washington Post
A national urban policy would not have saved Detroit, but the city's bankruptcy filing Thursday was a vivid reminder of how the problems of America's cities have long ceased to be a focal point of the political debate in presidential campaigns or the policy debate in Washington. The closest the candidates came in 2012 to the specific topic of the cities was the contentious argument between President Obama and Mitt Romney over the federal bailout of the auto industry. Obama pummeled Romney for an article he had written for the New York Times in late 2008 opposing federal intervention.
NEWS
July 21, 2013 | By Steven Mufson and Michael A. Fletcher, Washington Post
Detroit's historic bankruptcy filing aroused opposition from angry investors, public employees, and retirees Friday, as state leaders framed the action as their best shot at putting the ailing city on a road to recovery. Flanked by posters of the city's skyline with the words "Reinventing Detroit," the state-appointed emergency manager said Friday that he hopes the roughly $19 billion bankruptcy will provide the fiscal breathing room needed to repair the city's infrastructure and restore basic services.
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