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Development Corporation

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NEWS
March 11, 2016
The Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority Board on Wednesday selected Gregory Heller as its new executive director. Heller, CEO of the Baltimore-based nonprofit development corporation American Communities Trust, will fill the vacancy left by Brian Abernathy, who is now the first deputy managing director. Prior to working at American Communities Trust, Heller worked for Philadelphia-based Econsult Solutions and the Enterprise Center Community Development Corp. in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 23, 1987 | By Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County may be liable for at least $250,000 - about $150,000 more than initially suggested - in misappropriated community development funds, according to government officials familiar with a federal audit of the Community Development Department. Investigators from the Inspector General's Office of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development uncovered the additional irregularities during the closing days of their two-month review of the department, according to the officials, who asked not to be identified.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Linda A. Johnson, Special to The Inquirer
A pilot program of the Bucks County Housing Development Corp. will offer moderate-income, first-time home buyers the chance to own homes in Bristol Borough with a reduced-rate mortgage and a partial interest-free loan, officials announced Thursday. The program, a joint effort of the development corporation and Continental Bank, will allow two families meeting income and other requirements to buy $92,400 houses being built on the southwest corner of Bath and Mifflin Streets. The two semidetached houses, which should be completed by mid- October, each have three bedrooms, 1 1/2 bathrooms and wall-to-wall carpeting.
NEWS
October 29, 1986 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County may have to repay a federal grant program about $116,000 because of what officials say was inadequate record-keeping by the Greater Camden Development Corp., a nonprofit group that received almost $1.3 million in federal funds. County officials appealed to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development yesterday to approve the expenditures made by the development corporation from 1983 to 1985, thereby sparing the county from having to repay the federal Community Development Block Grant for the expenses.
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | By Hank Klibanoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
There is a weapon aimed at Center City. It goes by various cryptic abbreviations: the DMC, the SSD, the BDA. Designed not at the Pentagon but in Philadelphia, it was unveiled yesterday in a key meeting of Center City building owners and managers. It will cost a fair amount of money. If it gets funding, and if it works, the weapon may wipe out some key components and indigenous traits of Center City - dirty streets, graffiti, poor lighting, shoddy sidewalk maintenance, ugly landscaping and lousy marketing.
NEWS
June 4, 2002 | By Linda K. Harris INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Looking to buy a house? Can't afford a Society Hill townhouse or a Chestnut Hill estate? Lots of other viable options exist within the city. And that's exactly what the Central Philadelphia Development Corp. wants to press into the consciousness of homebuyers. Hoping to bring the success of a prosperous Center City to other neighborhoods in Philadelphia, the development corporation has targeted six neighborhoods to promote as places you'd love to hang your hat. "We looked for neighborhoods where there were people who were actively interested in seeing the neighborhood improve," said Paul R. Levy, executive director of the Center City District, which manages the development corporation.
NEWS
May 30, 2007 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A grassy patch under the Roosevelt Expressway is being converted to a 50-space parking lot, and leaders in East Falls are hailing the change as a key to this emerging community's future. Looking across the landscaped lot that is flanked by North Ferry Road, South Ferry Road, Ridge Avenue and Kelly Drive, Gina Snyder, executive director of East Falls Development Corp., said, "This is something people have been waiting for for years. " The East Falls gateway, which runs along Ridge Avenue from Allegheny Avenue to School House Lane, has grown in recent years to include numerous shops and restaurants, including the landmark Johnny Ma?anas Mexican grill at Ridge and Midvale Avenues.
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | By Charlotte Kidd, Special to The Inquirer
When commuters step off the SEPTA train in Conshohocken, they step onto the platform of a graffiti-marred brick shell that once was a prosperous suburban passenger station. The Greater Conshohocken Economic Development Corp., developer Donald Pulver and the Southeastern PennsylvaniaTransportation Authority want to transform the building into a bustling business stop. A safe, clean ticket station and waiting area to serve customers would suit SEPTA, said Jeff Ordway, SEPTA director of real estate.
NEWS
September 18, 1987 | By Frederick Cusick, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A spokesman for Gov. Casey said yesterday that the governor believed there was nothing improper about William Keisling, Casey's chief of staff, negotiating a $250,000 severance agreement with his private employer before he started his state job. "The governor was aware of the severance agreement and sees nothing wrong with it," said John Taylor, a deputy press secretary. Keisling, who served as president of the Harristown Development Corp., a nonprofit corporation that builds and manages major redevelopment projects for the City of Harrisburg, disclosed Wednesday that he had signed a severance agreement with the corporation in January, just before he took his job with Casey.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
For jewelry artisan Sarah Lewis, this month is a time for celebration. Celebration, yes. Easy breathing, no. She opened her boutique in Fishtown, Philadelphia's latest neighborhood-on-a-comeback, on May 6, 2011. Experts say five years in business is needed before survival can be declared for small start-ups. Lewis's smile gave way to a slightly pained expression when she was asked last week about her total investment to bring Adorn Boutique to life at 1314 Frankford Ave. There's a mortgage, and the cost of transforming the former welding shop into an inviting retail outpost.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 11, 2016
The Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority Board on Wednesday selected Gregory Heller as its new executive director. Heller, CEO of the Baltimore-based nonprofit development corporation American Communities Trust, will fill the vacancy left by Brian Abernathy, who is now the first deputy managing director. Prior to working at American Communities Trust, Heller worked for Philadelphia-based Econsult Solutions and the Enterprise Center Community Development Corp. in West Philadelphia.
REAL_ESTATE
September 6, 2015 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
The call from his Realtor came late on a Thursday night in winter 2013, and at first it baffled Vaughan Buckley. "She said, 'We're going to see this Victorian house tomorrow, and we're going to buy it,' " recalled Buckley, who started Vaughan Buckley Custom Homes in 2009. "I said, 'Jen, it's 11 o'clock. You know I don't buy houses. I'm a builder. I buy land.' " But shortly after sunrise, Buckley and Jennifer Grosskopf of Coldwell Banker were in front of a towering Second Empire-style Victorian house in Roxborough.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
For jewelry artisan Sarah Lewis, this month is a time for celebration. Celebration, yes. Easy breathing, no. She opened her boutique in Fishtown, Philadelphia's latest neighborhood-on-a-comeback, on May 6, 2011. Experts say five years in business is needed before survival can be declared for small start-ups. Lewis's smile gave way to a slightly pained expression when she was asked last week about her total investment to bring Adorn Boutique to life at 1314 Frankford Ave. There's a mortgage, and the cost of transforming the former welding shop into an inviting retail outpost.
NEWS
May 30, 2007 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A grassy patch under the Roosevelt Expressway is being converted to a 50-space parking lot, and leaders in East Falls are hailing the change as a key to this emerging community's future. Looking across the landscaped lot that is flanked by North Ferry Road, South Ferry Road, Ridge Avenue and Kelly Drive, Gina Snyder, executive director of East Falls Development Corp., said, "This is something people have been waiting for for years. " The East Falls gateway, which runs along Ridge Avenue from Allegheny Avenue to School House Lane, has grown in recent years to include numerous shops and restaurants, including the landmark Johnny Ma?anas Mexican grill at Ridge and Midvale Avenues.
REAL_ESTATE
February 4, 2007 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Even in a neighborhood as earthy and diverse as Mount Airy, the massive Flemish-brick building in the 6600 block of Germantown Avenue looks as if it were plucked from the edge of a canal in Amsterdam. Yet the structure, built in 1892 and designed by William Lightfoot Price, fits perfectly into plans the nonprofit Mount Airy USA community-development corporation has for the block and others along the avenue. Using grants from 13 sources and taking advantage of the city's 10-year tax abatement for residential construction, the organization has created four retail spaces on the first floor and carved six condominiums from the top floor.
NEWS
June 4, 2002 | By Linda K. Harris INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Looking to buy a house? Can't afford a Society Hill townhouse or a Chestnut Hill estate? Lots of other viable options exist within the city. And that's exactly what the Central Philadelphia Development Corp. wants to press into the consciousness of homebuyers. Hoping to bring the success of a prosperous Center City to other neighborhoods in Philadelphia, the development corporation has targeted six neighborhoods to promote as places you'd love to hang your hat. "We looked for neighborhoods where there were people who were actively interested in seeing the neighborhood improve," said Paul R. Levy, executive director of the Center City District, which manages the development corporation.
NEWS
October 24, 2000 | By Cynthia Burton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William Hankowsky, who helped chart the economic revitalization of Philadelphia under three mayors, is leaving the helm of the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp. Hankowsky, 49, of Chestnut Hill, is expected to make a formal announcement about his resignation today, according to people close to him. He will leave PIDC after 11 years as its president to work for developer Willard Rouse's Liberty Property Trust. During the last few years, Hankowsky has been the nuts-and-bolts negotiator in the city's drive to build new ballparks, a nettlesome project that continues to break deadlines and is likely to miss the Nov. 30 cutoff for City Council to approve a deal with the teams.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | By Michelle M. Martinez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
An 1882 foundry in the heart of this borough will open its doors tonight for the first time since the early 1980s, when it was in partial use as an industrial building. The foundry, a part of the former Phoenix Iron & Steel Co. and now referred to as the Historic Foundry Building, is being renovated through efforts of the Phoenixville Area Economic Development Corporation (PAEDCO), said Barbara Cohen, executive director of the organization. The development corporation, along with the Phoenixville Sesquicentennial Commission, will sponsor a sing-along that will take a musical journey through the borough's history at 7 tonight.
NEWS
August 13, 1997 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The vacant and crumbling George Washington Motor Lodge, a longtime eyesore along Route 1, might soon be replaced by a $10 million affordable senior housing development - with or without the cooperation of the owners. After months of discussions with the owners and local developers, the township moved Monday night to condemn the old roadside lodge if the owners did not agree to sell the four-acre lot to the township. "I hope that we can buy it directly from them," Mayor Joseph DiGirolamo said.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1997 | By Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Message to Philadelphia - don't get carried away. Despite the hoopla generated by the news of a $130 million entertainment project on Penn's Landing, another, far less pleasant reality about the Philadelphia economy was brought home last week. To wit: Even a top-rank developer and a gold-plated tenant can't persuade the private financial market to lend the cash needed to renovate a vacant Center City office building. City government still must step in, courtesy of a federal loan program.
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