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Development Projects

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NEWS
July 20, 1989 | By J.F. Casale, Special to The Inquirer
The Bristol Township Planning Commission has recommended final approval for two proposed developments and preliminary approval for a third. The votes were 3-0, with two members absent. At a meeting Tuesday night, the commission recommended that the Township Council approve Stan Wortman's plan for a building to handle large laundry equipment. Wortman proposes to build in the Magnolia Industrial Park, Section 2. The recommendation was contingent, however, on Wortman receiving approval of the Bucks County Soil Conservation Service and the Bucks County Planning Commission.
NEWS
June 17, 2008 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Nutter will seek to reassert the preeminence of the Planning Commission as the shepherd of growth and development in Philadelphia this evening in what aides are billing as a major address. "I'm here tonight to say as emphatically as I can that I want the Planning Commission to resume its leadership role in shaping our vision of the future and managing the development of our city," Nutter is expected to say tomorrow at the Academy of Natural Sciences, according to an early draft of his speech.
NEWS
May 14, 2010 | By Derrick Nunnally INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the hope of spurring economic development in disparate parts of Montgomery County, commissioners approved a $2 million loan Thursday for a Norristown business center and a $3 million grant for enhancements to conservationist John James Audubon's Lower Providence Township house. The loan to a Norristown developer for renovations to the sagging Logan Square shopping center followed a $1.9 million county grant awarded in September to USM, a janitorial-services company moving its North American headquarters into the complex.
NEWS
May 30, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust and the Macerich Co. say it will take $325 million in new investment to transform the Gallery at Market East into what they are calling Fashion Outlets of Philadelphia. That is on top of the $250 million already spent by PREIT to assemble what had been privately owned property in the project area, bringing the total development cost to about $575 million. The rest of the area still owned by the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority will be conveyed to the developers as part of the revitalization plan being reviewed by City Council.
NEWS
April 4, 2009
Pennsylvania lawmakers who want to stop the Delaware River Port Authority from lavishly spending toll revenues on dubious economic-development projects have the right intention. But it's too late to do anything about money already spent, and their bill's fate is so murky it may not be worth pursuing. Over the last decade, the DRPA has shelled out $375 million for development projects that include local sports stadiums, museums, concert venues, and, most recently, a memorial to the President's House near Independence Hall.
NEWS
December 18, 1986 | BY MICHELLE COLEMAN AND PHILIP M. LORD
Philadelphia has become two dramatically different cities - a flourishing downtown with impressive buildings and luxury homes and the wealthy residential areas of Chestnut Hill and the Far Northeast, juxtaposed with the abandonment and decay in our oldest neighborhoods. The contrast between the two cities can be traced to public and private decisions to invest Philadelphia resources disproportionately in center city. Providing subsidies and resources to downtown development in hope that they will "trickle down" to the neighborhoods is not working.
NEWS
June 21, 1988 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matthew B. Weinstein, 75, a developer of major apartment complexes in Philadelphia and the Main Line suburbs who was heavily involved in civic organizations, died yesterday at his Merion Station home. Mr. Weinstein began his development career in 1944 when he purchased two Haverford apartment buildings, Haverford Villa and Concord Arms. During the next four decades, he went from managing those buildings to becoming the developer of several thousand apartment units. Mr. Weinstein pursued his development projects primarily through Rosemont Construction Co., which he founded and served as president.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
ON CITY COUNCIL'S first day in session of the new year, Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell successfully led a charge to override Mayor Nutter's veto of a controversial bill that amends the five-month-old zoning code to give more power to the neighbors of development projects. The bill requires registered community organizations (RCO) and zoning applicants to provide notice to each neighbor within one block of a project and allows for multiple mandatory meetings with RCOs instead of just one. It also expands the civic design-review committee that was established to weigh in on major development projects to include a Council member.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2008 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What's a residential developer to do in these lean times with no banks lending money and few willing new home buyers? Well, besides planning on attending Phillies playoff games Wednesday and yesterday, Wayne developer Joe Duckworth is transitioning his Arcadia Land Co. into a consulting business for commercial banks and other institutions financing development projects. The goal of Arcadia Development Services, Duckworth said, is to help lenders "minimize their losses. " That could mean, for instance, getting them to force a change in the project before the first shovelful of ground is turned.
NEWS
August 11, 2012 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rejecting the prosecution's case as "an unconvincing web of circumstantial evidence," a federal judge on Friday found former New Jersey State Senator Wayne Bryant not guilty of corruption charges tied to a series of billion-dollar development projects proposed in Camden County and North Jersey. Prosecutors had argued that Bryant, a once-powerful Camden County Democrat, took bribes disguised as legal fees to do the bidding of a North Carolina developer that in 2004 had projects planned in the Cramer Hill section of Camden, on Petty's Island in Pennsauken, and in the Meadowlands.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 30, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust and the Macerich Co. say it will take $325 million in new investment to transform the Gallery at Market East into what they are calling Fashion Outlets of Philadelphia. That is on top of the $250 million already spent by PREIT to assemble what had been privately owned property in the project area, bringing the total development cost to about $575 million. The rest of the area still owned by the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority will be conveyed to the developers as part of the revitalization plan being reviewed by City Council.
NEWS
May 5, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
HADDON TWP. A long-awaited, and at times contentious, plan to turn a former diaper laundry site into a residential-and-retail hub for Haddon Township's aspiring downtown has taken yet another controversial turn - with possibly another on the way. Under a recently announced lawsuit settlement, retail will be stricken from the Towne Center at Haddon, the would-be development conveniently located on Haddon Avenue about a block from PATCO's Westmont station....
NEWS
May 3, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Traffic congestion and the possibility of losing a small-town feel are among Malvern residents' concerns about the development projects popping up in their one-stoplight town. Added to those long-term fears is an immediate annoyance for residents in a handful of houses behind the new Eastside Flats mixed-use buildings on East King Street. Lights from the parking garage, they say, shine into their homes at night. "It's like somebody having a spotlight on their house," said Mayor David Burton.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
WHILE THE CITY is trying to spur development, City Council last week made a major change to the 5-month-old zoning code that critics say could significantly slow building projects throughout the city. What Council did was override Mayor Nutter's veto Thursday of a bill sponsored by Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell that requires community organizations and zoning applicants to provide notice to each resident within one block of a project, as well as adjacent blocks. The change also allows for multiple mandatory meetings with these "registered community groups," or RCOs, instead of just one. In addition, it relaxes the requirements necessary for a group to be considered an RCO and expands the civic design-review committee - created to weigh in on major development projects - to include a designee by a Council member, and a seat for an additional RCO member.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
ON CITY COUNCIL'S first day in session of the new year, Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell successfully led a charge to override Mayor Nutter's veto of a controversial bill that amends the five-month-old zoning code to give more power to the neighbors of development projects. The bill requires registered community organizations (RCO) and zoning applicants to provide notice to each neighbor within one block of a project and allows for multiple mandatory meetings with RCOs instead of just one. It also expands the civic design-review committee that was established to weigh in on major development projects to include a Council member.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
John Grady doesn't have a dog. The president of Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp. has resisted getting one, despite considerable begging from his three young children. That's not to say he doesn't see value in canines. Quite the opposite. That's why PIDC recently guaranteed 50 percent of the $125,000 loan and line of credit that Portia Palko secured from Valley Green Bank to move her dog-day-care business, Central Bark, to a larger facility in Grays Ferry in July. Not that Palko - a Central Bark franchisee since 2007, who, as a nearly lifelong city resident, was well aware of PIDC - would even have thought to expect help from the 54-year-old economic-development nonprofit associated with some of Philadelphia's most ambitious building projects.
NEWS
August 12, 2012 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rejecting the prosecution's case as "an unconvincing web of circumstantial evidence," a federal judge on Friday found former New Jersey State Sen. Wayne Bryant not guilty of corruption charges tied to a series of billion-dollar development projects proposed in Camden County and North Jersey. Prosecutors had argued that Bryant, a once-powerful Camden County Democrat, took bribes disguised as legal fees to do the bidding of a North Carolina developer that in 2004 had projects planned in the Cramer Hill section of Camden, on Petty's Island in Pennsauken, and in the Meadowlands.
NEWS
August 11, 2012 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rejecting the prosecution's case as "an unconvincing web of circumstantial evidence," a federal judge on Friday found former New Jersey State Senator Wayne Bryant not guilty of corruption charges tied to a series of billion-dollar development projects proposed in Camden County and North Jersey. Prosecutors had argued that Bryant, a once-powerful Camden County Democrat, took bribes disguised as legal fees to do the bidding of a North Carolina developer that in 2004 had projects planned in the Cramer Hill section of Camden, on Petty's Island in Pennsauken, and in the Meadowlands.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in Trenton has begun weighing the fate of former State Sen. Wayne Bryant, who is already serving a four-year sentence for a corruption conviction and who could end up with additional jail time if convicted in the case pending against him. Testimony in the nonjury trial before Judge Freda L. Wolfson ended in February, but the judge gave the prosecution and defense a May 8 deadline to file legal briefs. The documents, more than 100 pages from the prosecution and 58 pages from the defense, summarize and expand on arguments and evidence introduced during the three-week trial.
NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying it marked the end of an expensive era, the board of the Delaware River Port Authority on Wednesday spent $20 million of its remaining economic-development funds for non-transportation projects. The board's two unappointed members, Pennsylvania's auditor general and treasurer, opposed the spending, arguing that the money should have gone for transportation projects or toward reducing the agency's $1.4 billion debt. The vote on the last $29.9 million of the DRPA's controversial economic-development funds sent about $10 million back to the agency for future capital projects and $19.7 million to such projects as local food banks, a new cancer center in Camden, student housing for Rutgers-Camden, and Cooper River rowing facilities.
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