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Developmental Disabilities

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NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Jessica Parks, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A couple of weeks ago, caretakers for 2,500 people with developmental disabilities were told that Montgomery County is ending its support coordination program and they have until Dec. 10 to select a private coordinator. The service will still be state-funded, their eligibility and benefits won't change, and house calls will still be the norm. They'll just have a new civilian case worker overseeing those benefits. And that can be a big deal. "It's a huge change, especially when you're dealing with kids with special needs.
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
A couple of weeks ago, caretakers for 2,500 people with developmental disabilities were told that Montgomery County is ending its support coordination program and they have until Dec. 10 to select a private coordinator. The service will still be state-funded, their eligibility and benefits won't change, and house calls will still be the norm. They'll just have a new civilian case worker overseeing those benefits. And that can be a big deal. "It's a huge change, especially when you're dealing with kids with special needs.
NEWS
December 15, 1997 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On the surface, it seemed to be a typical Hanukkah party; people singing familiar songs of their childhood - "I Have a Little Dreidel" and "Oh, Hanukkah" - and enjoying delicious potato latkes dipped in applesauce. But this particular gathering had a deeper meaning. This was a Gam Yahad program, specifically designed for adults with developmental disabilities. Six times a year, a Gam Yahad - Hebrew for "all together" - is held at a synagogue in the area. Yesterday it was at Har Zion Temple.
NEWS
January 4, 2005
Stereotyping the disabled AS DISABILITY advocates, we are committed to protecting the rights of Pennsylvanians with developmental disabilities and working to ensure that they can live, work, learn, play and be safe in the communities of their choice. In this regard, we felt it imperative to respond to Nicole Weisensee Egan's article "Suit: Child-sex ring cover-up" (Oct. 20). In the article, Ms. Egan describes an alleged case of sexual abuse against two young girls, one of whom has a developmental disability, and the so-called investigations of these allegations, involving both the state police and the Cumberland County DA's office.
NEWS
June 2, 2010
An item in the Monday Business section's "On the Boards" column gave an incorrect name for Bancroft, the Haddonfield provider of services to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357) at The Inquirer, Box 8263, Philadelphia 19101, or e-mail dsullivan@phillynews.
NEWS
May 24, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Rosen, 86, of Vineland, an administrator in New Jersey agencies for the disabled until he retired in 1988, died after a stroke on Sunday, May 22, at South Jersey Healthcare's Vineland Health Center. From 1971 to 1973, Mr. Rosen was the first president of the National Association of Superintendents of Public Residential Facilities for the Mentally Retarded. In 1973-74, he was president of the American Association on Mental Deficiency. A daughter, Diane Roach, said that in 1956, Mr. Rosen began his administrative career as director of education at the Vineland (N.J.)
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a time when increasing numbers of people say they are unaffiliated with any religion, a group with perhaps every reason to question God is talking about rocklike faith. Jacob Story says his faith gets hard core when the teasing gets relentless. "I feel like I'm being bullied because they know more stuff than [me]," Story, 21, of Quakertown, said. That's when he focuses on the Biblical passage about being humble and humility leading to good things. Story is sitting in a circle of 15 at a meeting of Faith and Light, a combination fellowship gathering and worship service.
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
"It was my birthday yesterday!" exclaimed a smiling Chris Stahl, one of nearly 50 developmentally disabled adults who lives on Bancroft's Lakeside campus in Woodstown, Salem County. Earlier that day, staff took him to the movies - his favorite thing to do. Just meeting him, one wouldn't guess this man's long list of issues includes obsessive-compulsive and bipolar disorders and anxiety so severe he has often hurt himself. "For the past six months, thank God, he hasn't been banging his head and going to the emergency room," said his mother, Camille.
NEWS
October 20, 2010
Obama: 2012 VP rumor 'unfounded' WASHINGTON - President Obama said speculation that he would replace Vice President Biden with Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton when seeking reelection in 2012 was "completely unfounded. " In an interview with the National Journal, the president said he had not made a "formal decision" on running for a second term. He said Biden and Clinton, who both also sought the Democratic presidential nomination in 2008, were "doing outstanding jobs where they are. " Clinton said Oct. 6 that she had "absolutely no interest" in replacing Biden on the 2012 Democratic ticket.
NEWS
September 30, 2005 | By Terry Bitman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former head of a national advocacy group for the disabled has been hired by New Jersey's Office of the Child Advocate to monitor Bancroft Neurohealth's compliance with an agreement that followed a state investigation. Steven M. Eidelman, a professor of human services at the University of Delaware, will provide technical assistance to Bancroft as an "independent expert" as it implements the agreement reached in July. The Office of the Child Advocate conducted a 15-month investigation after parents alleged that children had been unsupervised and unnecessarily restrained at Bancroft's Pediatric and Adolescent facility in Haddonfield.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 5, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Even in high school, Kathleen Brown McHale, now 62, found herself drawn to her classmates with developmental disabilities. "I volunteered - at lunch, I was with the kids that had development disabilities," said Brown McHale, president and chief executive of Special People in Northeast Inc. (SPIN), a Philadelphia nonprofit that provides life-long services, including residential care to people with intellectual, developmental and autism disabilities. It also offers early childhood services, and especially important in the summer, a camp for people with special needs.
NEWS
December 19, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
Two employees of a Haddonfield nonprofit that cares for children with developmental and other disabilities assaulted two teenagers with special needs this month, and detectives are trying to determine whether there are more victims, authorities said Thursday. Nastassia Hines, 28, of Burlington City, and Mondja Djamba, 28, of Clementon, have been charged with aggravated assault and endangering the welfare of a child in the Dec. 8 incidents at Bancroft. Hines and Djamba hit a 14-year-old boy with a belt in the early morning, the Camden County Prosecutor's Office said.
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
"It was my birthday yesterday!" exclaimed a smiling Chris Stahl, one of nearly 50 developmentally disabled adults who lives on Bancroft's Lakeside campus in Woodstown, Salem County. Earlier that day, staff took him to the movies - his favorite thing to do. Just meeting him, one wouldn't guess this man's long list of issues includes obsessive-compulsive and bipolar disorders and anxiety so severe he has often hurt himself. "For the past six months, thank God, he hasn't been banging his head and going to the emergency room," said his mother, Camille.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the end of Collingswood High School's rollicking performance Friday morning of Shrek the Musical , the cast broke into the old Monkees' hit "I'm a Believer," and the audience rocked right along - nodding, dancing, clapping to the beat. But even before that, audience members were far from sedate, aloof spectators - as they swayed to the music, perking up for the songs, clapping hands, some squealing, a few rising to their feet. And that was OK. In fact, it was encouraged. Collingswood's guests that morning were people with developmental disorders and disabilities, and the performance was an example of a growing means of inclusion: sensory friendliness.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the farm at Camphill Village Kimberton Hills in Chester County, the stalks on the chard are a startling fire-truck red. The eggplants, shiny as the Lexuses and Mercedeses in the parking lot, offer mirrorlike reflections of moneyed folk with the luck and good sense to eat well. Flawless, fabulous vegetables have long been a perk of the middle and upper classes, who could afford to pay as much as $765 for 24 weeks of produce as part of the community supported agriculture program (CSA)
NEWS
March 29, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new federal report shows yet another unexplained increase in the percentage of children with autism, with New Jersey having the highest rate of 11 states studied. The report, released Thursday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, found that 1 in 68 children had autism in the regions examined, which were not representative of the country as a whole. In New Jersey, long a hotbed of the diagnosis, the rate was 1 in 46. The disorder is almost five times more common in boys than in girls.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bancroft, the Haddonfield nonprofit that provides group homes and outpatient services for 1,500 people with autism, brain injuries, and developmental disabilities, had come perilously close to closing when Toni Pergolin, 50, chief executive officer, was hired in 2004. These days, Bancroft is on more solid financial footing and is outgrowing its Haddonfield campus. Whether Bancroft will move and what will happen to its campus is unresolved, and controversial. Question: So, is it still an open question - whether Bancroft stays or goes?
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Jessica Parks, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A couple of weeks ago, caretakers for 2,500 people with developmental disabilities were told that Montgomery County is ending its support coordination program and they have until Dec. 10 to select a private coordinator. The service will still be state-funded, their eligibility and benefits won't change, and house calls will still be the norm. They'll just have a new civilian case worker overseeing those benefits. And that can be a big deal. "It's a huge change, especially when you're dealing with kids with special needs.
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
A couple of weeks ago, caretakers for 2,500 people with developmental disabilities were told that Montgomery County is ending its support coordination program and they have until Dec. 10 to select a private coordinator. The service will still be state-funded, their eligibility and benefits won't change, and house calls will still be the norm. They'll just have a new civilian case worker overseeing those benefits. And that can be a big deal. "It's a huge change, especially when you're dealing with kids with special needs.
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a time when increasing numbers of people say they are unaffiliated with any religion, a group with perhaps every reason to question God is talking about rocklike faith. Jacob Story says his faith gets hard core when the teasing gets relentless. "I feel like I'm being bullied because they know more stuff than [me]," Story, 21, of Quakertown, said. That's when he focuses on the Biblical passage about being humble and humility leading to good things. Story is sitting in a circle of 15 at a meeting of Faith and Light, a combination fellowship gathering and worship service.
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