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Devil

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Satan may be popping up with alarming regularity in movies right now, but his appearance in Bedazzled is a temptation that can be easily and safely resisted. Harold Ramis' remake of the 1967 cult favorite, which starred Peter Cook as the prince of darkness and Dudley Moore as a short-order cook with a bad case of unrequited lust, is, to put it kindly, dreary and redundant. In this Bedazzled, the devil is played by Elizabeth Hurley. When she shows up to offer to fulfill seven wishes for Brendan Fraser, his response will leave men in the audience gasping in incredulity.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2009 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
Comics Guy feels the need to describe the lead character in Dynamite's latest "Project Superpowers" spinoff, "The Death-Defying Devil,"because writer Joe Casey sure doesn't, at least not in a traditional way. If you're unfamiliar with the character, you get only bits and pieces of who he is and what he can do in the first two issues. Casey and Dynamite likely felt they could get away with this mystery-heavy approach since there are tons of Alex Ross fans who would be drawn to the project because of his involvement in the book as plotter, cover artist and art director and "Project Superheroes" has proved an incredibly popular title for Dynamite.
NEWS
July 24, 1993 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The prosecutor called the woman "a firebug" yesterday. And Delores Castro, 59, didn't disagree. But Castro, a former mental patient, said she had no control over herself when she set fire to an apartment building last year, killing a 73-year-old man, and causing five others to be hospitalized, including a firefighter. "The devil made me do it," said Castro, who pleaded guilty, but mentally ill, to a second-degree murder before Common Pleas Judge Robert A. Latrone. The judge sentenced her to life in prison, ordering the term to begin in a mental institution.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
The Master and Margarita is one of those don't-drop-it-on-your-foot Russian novels that I confess I've owned for many years but never read. Mum Puppettheatre's production is an adaptation for two people and many, many puppets; it is an immense undertaking and the two actors/puppeteers - Robert Smythe and Robert DaPonte - perform heroically. It must be said, however, that puppet shows shouldn't be three hours long - especially if the staging involves a lot of neck-craning that segues into shoulder-shrugging as the plot becomes more and more incoherent.
NEWS
October 23, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"Prince of Darkness," a horror film starring Donald Pleasance, Lisa Blount, Victor Wong and Jameson Parker. Directed by John Carpenter. Screenplay by Martin Quartermass. Running time: 98 minutes. A Universal release. At area theaters. "Prince of Darkness," John Carpenter's latest horror extravaganza, is scary. It's funny. It makes absolutely no sense, but, as the poet Robert Frost noted in another context, "When was that ever a bar to any watch they keep?" As far as I can tell, the film is about the return to consciousness of the Devil, who, for reasons I still haven't figured out, has been kept prisoner for the last 2,000 years in a liquid cannister, currently located in the basement of a Los Angeles Catholic church.
LIVING
November 2, 1997 | By Thomas G. Long, FOR THE INQUIRER
On Friday night, neighborhoods were filled with devils and ghouls roving under the watchful eye of parents. For most people, the sight was worth a chuckle and a few pieces of trick-or-treat candy. For others, though, such devilry and revelry are no laughing matter, but a dangerous flirtation with forces of evil. "Halloween is the devil's day," says Peggy Scrimali, head of Bethel Christian Academy in Blackwood, N.J., a nursery school and kindergarten where Halloween was not observed.
NEWS
June 12, 1987 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
"The Witches of Eastwick," a supernatural comedy-drama starring Jack Nicholson, Cher, Susan Sarandon and Michelle Pfeiffer. Directed by George Miller. Produced by Neil Canton, Peter Guber and Jon Peters. Screenplay by Michael Cristofer. Based on John Updike's novel. Running Time 121 minutes. Presented by Warner Bros. at area theaters. Attired in a quilt-like shirt of brilliant reds, blues and greens, Australian director George "Mad Max Trilogy" Miller sat in a posh Park Avenue hotel suite recently, attempting to put into words his feelings about Jack Nicholson - satanic star of Miller's supernatural comedy-drama, "The Witches of Eastwick.
NEWS
March 17, 2008 | By SUSAN DORAN
THIS IS no country for old women trying to imply that they can speak before the devil knows they're speaking. But it IS a country that had better become acutely aware of the devil Hillary as a master of manipulation who offers the audacity of desperation and deceit through her many disciples. Somehow the sulfuric odor rising up from her crocodile tears must have wafted across the room and dulled the senses of those who witnessed that Hillaryous crying stint, and so New Hampshire went the wrong way. But since then, we've cleared our eyes and donned our gas masks, and we now have no excuses but to see her exploitative side in all its ugliness.
SPORTS
August 23, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Kelvim Escobar and the Anaheim Angels shut down the Yankees all weekend. Good thing for New York it's not October yet. Escobar (8-9) outdueled Kevin Brown (9-3), Bengie Molina went 4-for-4 with a three-run homer and visiting Anaheim completed a three-game sweep of the Yankees with a 4-3 win yesterday. "This is a playoff team. You need to go in and show you can play with them," Angels closer Troy Percival said. "We ran into a New York team that isn't playing its best ball - we know that.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
When Mel Gibson, playing the 18th-century owner of a South Carolina plantation, plows his own field in "The Patriot," it seemed a little suspicious. When the British come to recruit his "slaves" as soldiers, they refuse, noting that they are free men, working the plantation for wages. This also seemed a little suspicious, given the time and place, although historians will point out it was certainly possible: Free blacks did exist. Yeah, well, so did slaves, and "The Patriot" seemed to tap-dance around the rather gnarly subject of a man who fought for one kind of freedom but not another.
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SPORTS
July 27, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
When it came time to clean out his office at the Prudential Center in Newark, N.J., Lou Lamoriello probably didn't have much work ahead of him. He decorated the place sparsely on purpose - no photos of his family or friends or former coaches and players, not a touchstone from his personal past to be found, nothing to obscure his single-minded focus. One day in February 2011, as Lamoriello sat behind his desk for an interview, the only accoutrements in the room were seven replica trophies atop a shelf: four of the Prince of Wales Trophy, awarded to the winner of the NHL's Eastern Conference, and three of the Stanley Cup. He added one more to that collection the following year, when the New Jersey Devils reached the Stanley Cup Finals for the last time during Lamoriello's tenure, and by now he's likely boxed up those trophies and shipped them to Ontario.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
You could choose to accept at face value the basic story line of The Rake's Progress - a Faustian fable, a tale of simpletons ending the opera by stepping out of character and singing the moral of the story directly at the audience. But in its spare, handsome sets by Amy Rubin and smartly underplayed direction of Jordan Fein, the Curtis Institute of Music production heard Sunday at the Prince Theater gave listeners every chance to decode connections between Stravinsky's acerbic score and one of the most artfully constructed librettos in the repertoire.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Endurance racing isn't just a matter of horsepower and stamina. Strategy and skill count, too. "It's about going as fast as you possibly can through the turns," Mike LaMaina says. "It's about the momentum. " A lifelong motorhead, LaMaina will be at the wheel of his 1992 Mazda Miata at the Devil in the Dark race Saturday at the New Jersey Motorsports Park in Millville. The event, sanctioned by the Sports Car Club of America, runs from noon to midnight. "When it gets dark is when it gets fun," LaMaina, 55, tells me, eyes shining.
SPORTS
April 7, 2015 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Sports Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
FULL DISCLOSURE time. I have been a Duke fan ever since Gene "Tinkerbell" Banks announced he was heading to Durham in 1977. That was pre-Laettner, pre-Krzyzewski and pre-titles. I have also come to respect the Duke program, having met Coach K not only as a media member but also as a parent when my son attended Duke's camp. He was cordial, professional and everything I expected him to be. But tonight I will be pulling for the Badgers of Wisconsin. Why? I have always been a Bo Ryan fan, for the same reason I am a Tom Izzo and Mike Krzyzewski fan: Their teams win with class and play the right way. OK, Christian Lattener stomped on a Wildcat's chest one time, but other than that . . . No one really seems to hate the Badgers.
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Are they rooting for Duke at the Southwest Philadelphia Police Athletic League center at 59th and Elmwood? They have no choice, said Officer Cedric Jones, who runs the PAL center. Jones first got to know Duke's Amile Jefferson when he came into a PAL center at 46th and Woodland when Jefferson was 9 years old. Since then, wherever Jones has worked, Jefferson has dropped in, including 11th and Huntington and 32d and Tasker. Jones' current office, he admits, is sort of a shrine to Jefferson.
SPORTS
March 10, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEWARK, N.J. - A weekend that began with so much optimism has ended with the Flyers desperately clinging to their fading playoff hopes. After a dispirited 5-2 loss Sunday to the New Jersey Devils at the Prudential Center, coach Craig Berube and his players were questioning the team's fortitude and competitive level. "Today I thought mentally we weren't there in this game," Berube said. "I think that defeat in Boston obviously had an effect on our team and mentally we weren't there today.
SPORTS
February 16, 2015 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Jahlil Okafor had 23 points and 13 rebounds for his ninth double-double of the season, outplaying Syracuse big man Rakeem Christmas as No. 4 Duke beat the Orange, 80-72, on Saturday night in Syracuse, N.Y. Duke (22-3, 9-3 Atlantic Coast Conference) won its fifth straight and withstood a standout performance from ex-Blue Devil Michael Gbinije, who scored a career-high 27 points for Syracuse. Syracuse (16-9, 7-5) had exhibited plenty of grit in the two games since a postseason ban was announced as the school awaits the results of an NCAA investigation into the athletic department.
SPORTS
January 5, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEWARK, N.J. - About two hours before the opening faceoff at the Prudential Center on Saturday night, Flyers coach Craig Berube said the availability of Claude Giroux hinged on how the captain felt during warm-ups. Giroux's absence from the 15-minute pregame skate offered a swift answer to that question. With the freaky lower left leg laceration he suffered the prior night keeping Giroux off the ice, the Flyers were tasked with trying to stop the bleeding of a four-game losing streak without their best player.
SPORTS
December 13, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the Flyers' 28th game, there was a Matt Read sighting at the Wells Fargo Center on Thursday night. Read had his first goal in 11 games - and his first multi-point performance of the season - as he sparked the Flyers to a 4-1 win over the New Jersey Devils. "I wouldn't say I was losing confidence, but getting frustrated a little bit," said Read, who had just one goal in his previous 20 games. ". . . Things just bounced my way tonight. " The Flyers, opening a four-game homestand, have a modest four-game points streak, during which they are 2-0-2.
SPORTS
October 11, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wayne Simmonds threw his arms in the air as he embraced Claude Giroux, Jake Voracek, and Vinny Lecavalier while the frenzied sellout crowd stood in disbelief Thursday night. Simmonds knew. The right winger knew his shot had beaten the buzzer to end the astonishing last few minutes of the second period, knew the Flyers had come all the way back from a 3-0 deficit, knew this game suddenly had a different feel to it. But the Flyers couldn't sustain the momentum. Dainius Zubrus scored what proved to be the game-winner as the New Jersey Devils outlasted the Flyers, 6-4, and ruined their home opener.
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