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Deviled Eggs

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NEWS
June 16, 2003 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
"I'm cooking dinner when I get home!" Teddy announces to everyone he sees, and then he invites them to come home and eat. His foster mother has laughter in her voice as she tells this story and adds that deviled eggs are the only thing he can actually fix. He does want to learn to cook, and his favorite foods are cheese pizza, spaghetti, chips, and hot dogs with ketchup. Church is a joy for Teddy, 7, and he likes singing "Jesus Loves Me" and attending Sunday school. He enjoys riding a bike in the park and going on the swings and slides, bouncing a basketball and watching the game on television, and playing with video games and toy trucks.
NEWS
March 20, 1988 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
A ride in the country may be just the thing to celebrate the first day of spring today. If you make the lovely Sunday brunch at the classy William Penn Inn in Gwynedd your final destination, you may guarantee yourself a happy day. A landmark since 1714, the elegantly appointed William Penn boasts good cuisine and service. At $10.95, the buffet brunch is one of the region's better deals - and you may not feel like eating again the rest of the day. The highlight of the buffet tables are poached egg dishes not offered at many other local restaurants.
NEWS
May 5, 2011 | By FRANK DOUGHERTY, Special to the Daily News
JACK BROWN, a retired truck driver who so loved Phillies baseball games that he turned off the volume on his TV to call his own plays, died Monday after a long battle with heart and lung disease. He was 72 and lived in North Cape May, N.J. "Jack was more than just a fan of baseball and the Phillies," said his wife, Maureen Dougherty Brown. "He had an incredible grasp of the game, and understood all the aspects and nuances that make baseball such a compelling sport. " While sitting in the sunshine at Citizens Bank Park or in his living-room recliner, Jack's calls were always on point.
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | By Ashley Primis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tasty English food has gone from an oxymoron to a driving culinary trend in this country, thanks to chefs such as April Bloomfield of New York's Spotted Pig. Once-stuffy dishes rooted in British history are suddenly hip, made with a lighter hand and quality, seasonal ingredients. In Philadelphia, British mania can be found in gastropubs such as Pub & Kitchen and the across-the-pond-themed eatery the Dandelion, but also through subtle menu touches. Marc Vetri put rarebit on the menu at his new pub, Alla Spina, though it's made Italian style, with sunny-side-up egg and applewood smoked bacon.
FOOD
April 7, 1993 | By Kim Pierce, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sure as bluebonnets bloom each spring, Easter heralds a hard-cooked egg bonanza. And the inevitable quandary: what to do with all those decorated orbs once the Easter egg hunt is over. If you've had them out of the refrigerator for more than two hours, the U.S. Department of Agriculture advises throwing them away because of the risk of food-borne illness. Eggs used in a long Easter egg hunt, for example, or those that are allowed to cool in their cooking water, then are dyed, would be highly suspect.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2007
One key ingredient makes every dish profiled in "America's Best Lost Recipes" special: the family story behind it. Here are some recipes and their stories.   Laura Fischer, of Chicago, had this to say about her grandfather's recipe: "Grandpa Cooley didn't like kids - not even his own grandkids. Or so it seemed. He was gruff at best, mean at worse, smoked two packs a day, and owned a cherished rack of hunting rifles that towered over my grandparents' basement. But Grandpa Cooley had a side I loved - he could cook.
FOOD
March 4, 1987 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
Speak of the devil and some people think chocolate: devil's-food cake or similarly sinful stuff. But others think spicy mustard seasonings. The word "devil" in French is "diable," and a dish described "au diable" on a French menu generally means mustard plus other spicy ingredients. Originally it just meant hot and spicy - with or without mustard - but the mustard-laced dishes once regarded as "hot as hell" seem tame, so the connection with mustard seems to be part of modern usage.
NEWS
March 17, 1987 | By Rich Henson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Out here in the Avon Grove School District, in a corner of southern Chester County where an occasional chicken can still be seen pecking in the gravel beside busy U.S. Route 1, the Red Devil has fought off another attempt at exorcism. He still leers from the blazing red and yellow banner in the high school gymnasium - the sinister eyes, the pointed black beard, the metallic-colored wristband on his muscular left arm, the biggest set of pectorals this side of Arnold Schwarzenegger.
NEWS
August 13, 2004 | By Karen Warrington
Pre-Atlantic City Expressway, in the midst of sweltering, non-air-conditioned summers, many black families in Philadelphia piled into their Buicks and Oldsmobiles and motored down the Black Horse or White Horse Pike for a day on the beach in Atlantic City. Food, bathing suits, towels, blankets, and buckets and shovels were stacked in the car trunk or in the backseat. These trips were family affairs. They included aunts, uncles, cousins, and people who were like family - play-aunts, play-uncles and play-cousins.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Genevieve McLaughlin is a slight, white-haired grandmother who feeds birds and squirrels in her back yard, offers occasional refuge to a homeless man she knows only as Charles and, every night of the week, hosts a houseful of children, grandchildren and their friends. "We have a tradition of giving. I grew up with it," she said. And so, when McLaughlin decided to retire after 18 1/2 years with Independence Blue Cross, she asked that the company forgo a traditional retirement luncheon - a $1,200 affair - and give the money to charity.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
September 21, 2012 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hammonton coach Pete Lancetta is on the verge of becoming the eighth coach to win 200 games in South Jersey football history - and the second in two weeks. Lancetta will reach 200 victories if visiting Hammonton beats Egg Harbor Township on Friday night in a Cape-Atlantic League American Division game. West Deptford's Clyde Folsom won his 200th game last Friday. Here's a closer look at some of this weekend's top games. Last week: 8-2. Year to date: 13-7. Friday, 7 p.m. No. 7 Moorestown (2-0)
NEWS
May 24, 2012
1 dozen eggs 6 tablespoons mayonnaise 1 teaspoon dry mustard 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1/2 teaspoon paprika 1/4 cup sweet pickle relish 5 strips of cooked bacon, crumbled 1/2 teaspoon hot sauce   1. Place the eggs in a pot of water. Bring water to a boil and then turn off heat. Let the eggs rest in the water for 15 minutes. 2. Peel the eggs and cut in half vertically. Remove the yolks and place in a bowl.
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | By Ashley Primis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tasty English food has gone from an oxymoron to a driving culinary trend in this country, thanks to chefs such as April Bloomfield of New York's Spotted Pig. Once-stuffy dishes rooted in British history are suddenly hip, made with a lighter hand and quality, seasonal ingredients. In Philadelphia, British mania can be found in gastropubs such as Pub & Kitchen and the across-the-pond-themed eatery the Dandelion, but also through subtle menu touches. Marc Vetri put rarebit on the menu at his new pub, Alla Spina, though it's made Italian style, with sunny-side-up egg and applewood smoked bacon.
NEWS
May 5, 2011 | By FRANK DOUGHERTY, Special to the Daily News
JACK BROWN, a retired truck driver who so loved Phillies baseball games that he turned off the volume on his TV to call his own plays, died Monday after a long battle with heart and lung disease. He was 72 and lived in North Cape May, N.J. "Jack was more than just a fan of baseball and the Phillies," said his wife, Maureen Dougherty Brown. "He had an incredible grasp of the game, and understood all the aspects and nuances that make baseball such a compelling sport. " While sitting in the sunshine at Citizens Bank Park or in his living-room recliner, Jack's calls were always on point.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2007
One key ingredient makes every dish profiled in "America's Best Lost Recipes" special: the family story behind it. Here are some recipes and their stories.   Laura Fischer, of Chicago, had this to say about her grandfather's recipe: "Grandpa Cooley didn't like kids - not even his own grandkids. Or so it seemed. He was gruff at best, mean at worse, smoked two packs a day, and owned a cherished rack of hunting rifles that towered over my grandparents' basement. But Grandpa Cooley had a side I loved - he could cook.
NEWS
August 13, 2004 | By Karen Warrington
Pre-Atlantic City Expressway, in the midst of sweltering, non-air-conditioned summers, many black families in Philadelphia piled into their Buicks and Oldsmobiles and motored down the Black Horse or White Horse Pike for a day on the beach in Atlantic City. Food, bathing suits, towels, blankets, and buckets and shovels were stacked in the car trunk or in the backseat. These trips were family affairs. They included aunts, uncles, cousins, and people who were like family - play-aunts, play-uncles and play-cousins.
NEWS
June 16, 2003 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
"I'm cooking dinner when I get home!" Teddy announces to everyone he sees, and then he invites them to come home and eat. His foster mother has laughter in her voice as she tells this story and adds that deviled eggs are the only thing he can actually fix. He does want to learn to cook, and his favorite foods are cheese pizza, spaghetti, chips, and hot dogs with ketchup. Church is a joy for Teddy, 7, and he likes singing "Jesus Loves Me" and attending Sunday school. He enjoys riding a bike in the park and going on the swings and slides, bouncing a basketball and watching the game on television, and playing with video games and toy trucks.
FOOD
April 27, 1994 | By Jeanette Holley, FOR THE INQUIRER
When I am asked to describe "fusion cooking," I lean toward an explanation that has a specific meaning for me. Fusion cooking is food that I grew up eating. Two totally different cultures, Japanese and African American, became a union when my mother married my father - and so did the food in our home. Of course, many meals that we ate retained the elements of each cuisine but, at times, the dishes borrowed parts from each other to develop a language of their own. Having a Japanese mother and living in Asia for 17 years gave me an opportunity to be a participant in that culture.
FOOD
April 7, 1993 | By Kim Pierce, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sure as bluebonnets bloom each spring, Easter heralds a hard-cooked egg bonanza. And the inevitable quandary: what to do with all those decorated orbs once the Easter egg hunt is over. If you've had them out of the refrigerator for more than two hours, the U.S. Department of Agriculture advises throwing them away because of the risk of food-borne illness. Eggs used in a long Easter egg hunt, for example, or those that are allowed to cool in their cooking water, then are dyed, would be highly suspect.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Genevieve McLaughlin is a slight, white-haired grandmother who feeds birds and squirrels in her back yard, offers occasional refuge to a homeless man she knows only as Charles and, every night of the week, hosts a houseful of children, grandchildren and their friends. "We have a tradition of giving. I grew up with it," she said. And so, when McLaughlin decided to retire after 18 1/2 years with Independence Blue Cross, she asked that the company forgo a traditional retirement luncheon - a $1,200 affair - and give the money to charity.
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