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Dexter

NEWS
March 26, 2003 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Archaeologists yesterday pulled their final bucket of earth from the last 18-foot-deep privy found on the North Fifth Street homesite of James Oronoko Dexter, a former slave and 18th-century black leader. The dig, prompted by construction of the National Constitution Center, began just over a month ago and yielded thousands of artifacts - everything from a plethora of brushes to fine Chinese porcelain and small glass trade beads. "It was very successful," said Jed Levin, an archaeologist with the National Park Service, which has stewardship of the site, on the northernmost block of Independence Mall.
NEWS
January 17, 2003 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
No one knows what James Dexter looked like or where he was born. No one knows where and how he died or if anyone kept vigil at his bedside. But James Dexter made his mark on Philadelphia and the nation, and now, 200 years later, his name is emerging from obscurity and into controversy, thanks to construction on Independence Mall. The now-demolished two-story brick rowhouse on North Fifth Street where Dexter once lived witnessed planning for the nation's first black organizations.
NEWS
January 15, 2003 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the city's two oldest black congregations have joined in calling for an excavation of the homesite of James Dexter, a former slave and a founder of the nation's first African American human-rights group. Regardless of whether the site on Independence Mall proves a trove of historical artifacts or archaeologists come up empty-handed, the churches - along with growing numbers of historians, writers and black civic and political leaders - maintain that excavation is simply the right thing to do. Dexter's modest 18th-century home was on North Fifth Street, where the National Constitution Center, currently under construction, and the National Park Service plan to locate a bus depot to serve visitors to Independence National Historical Park.
SPORTS
March 26, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Sheriff's deputies arrested former NFL star Dexter Manley yesterday at a Houston hospital, where he had checked in after missing a court-ordered meeting in the wake of his conviction for evidence tampering. Manley was found guilty last Wednesday after a jury determined he tried to swallow less than a gram of cocaine during a 2001 drug bust in Houston. Sentencing is set for April 5, but Manley had been required to meet with a probation officer Thursday and failed to show up. His attorney, Jonathan Munier, said the former Pro Bowl defensive lineman checked into Riverside General Hospital over the weekend for depression.
NEWS
February 25, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After Jay Schiller lost his left hand in an accident 13 years ago, he, like many amputees, continued to feel the distinct sensation of a "phantom limb" - one with five fingers that he could still wiggle. "It feels like I still have a hand," said Schiller, 31, a chemist near Princeton who lives with his wife and 7-month-old daughter in Toms River. Little did he imagine that, with the help of a Rutgers University inventor, this phantom hand would eventually take on solid form - solid enough to plunk out "Mary Had a Little Lamb" on a piano.
NEWS
December 7, 2001 | By Nancy Phillips INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two top commanders in the Philadelphia Police Department have emerged as leading contenders to succeed Commissioner John F. Timoney, with his second-in-command, Deputy Commissioner Sylvester M. Johnson, perceived to have the edge. Police officials said yesterday that Johnson, Timoney's No. 2 man and a 37-year veteran of the force, appeared to be the front-runner and was believed to be the commissioner's choice for a replacement. Mayor Street named him acting commissioner after the announcement of Timoney's resignation on Wednesday.
NEWS
April 24, 2001 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's Board of Education hired a high-ranking police official yesterday to oversee safety in the 210,000-student district. Dexter Green, 50, a former city high school teacher and a 29-year city police veteran, will remain attached to the Police Department but will be paid by the school district, which he will serve as chief safety executive. Green, selected from more than 100 applicants, is to be paid $107,000 a year in the new position, which was recommended last year by a consultant after a review of the district's safety operations.
FOOD
September 10, 2000 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
Max Hansen has had a wide variety of experiences during his career as a caterer and restaurant chef, but until recently, he had never chopped vegetables while traveling at 65 miles per hour. "I was happy to survive the trip with all my digits intact. We were lucky that nobody got cut," said Hansen, chef-owner of Max & Me Catering in Holicong, Bucks County, after a whirlwind three-day assignment on the Bush-Cheney campaign train that hurtled through Midwestern battleground states on the weekend following the Republican Convention.
NEWS
June 12, 2000 | by Regina Medina, Daily News Staff Writer
Dexter Green was a young police officer in 1980 when he first came face to face with legendary Chief Inspector George Fencl. Fencl, one of the most highly respected cops in Philadelphia history, was known for fair treatment of everyone. The brief meeting inspired Green to become a policeman who emulates Fencl. A fair guy. "I walk into the Roundhouse and I see George Fencl there waiting for the elevator, talking to someone else," said Green, now 49. "He spoke. " Maybe Fencl said "Good morning" to Green.
NEWS
May 23, 2000 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William Felder is a convicted felon. By his own account, he was a money launderer. He sold drugs, first to high-flying Wall Street customers, then to regular street buyers. He used drugs, too. He lived on the streets of Manhattan, sometimes in subway tunnels. That's Felder's past. He sees his future in different hues. Yesterday, under a chilly May rain, Felder, garbed in the citron-lined hood of a master's-degree recipient in social work, hooted and hollered and hugged the classmates around him. At 53, he was among the most ebullient of the University of Pennsylvania's 5,000 or so graduates gathered on the puddled Franklin Field Astroturf.
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