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Diabetes

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NEWS
June 19, 2012 | Wires
Question: Can intense itching be a side effect for someone with diabetes whose blood sugars are poorly controlled? Answer: Poorly controlled diabetes is one possible cause for unexplained itching. Exactly how diabetes causes itching isn't certain, but suggested causes include diabetic nerve root injury, metabolic abnormalities from widely fluctuating blood sugars, and dry skin. If this is the cause, it should improve with better efforts to lower the blood sugars.   That said, there are many other causes for severe itching.
NEWS
January 22, 1998 | By Frank Bertucci, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Kevin Montgomery, 17, never let diabetes prevent him from keeping an appointment, whether it was a basketball game or a performance in a school play. Montgomery, of Levittown, a senior at Holy Ghost Prep who was manager of the basketball team, died of a diabetic attack at his home Tuesday afternoon, after returning from school where he had taken midterm exams in the morning. He was found by his younger brother. "People who knew him knew this was a serious problem," said Tony Chapman, Holy Ghost's basketball coach.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2008
THRIVING WITH TYPE 1 CATHERINE MILLER, who is 26 and lives in West Chester, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 15. "I wasn't really surprised because my mom has it, my grandmother and grandfather had it, a couple of my uncles have it, so it was inevitable for at least me or my brother to get it, and I was the lucky one. " It threw her for a loop initially. "I was 15 and they were giving me all sorts of medication," she says. "But I knew it was going to come. " Taking the time to eat right for blood-sugar control was her major challenge as a teenager.
SPORTS
March 20, 2007 | Inquirer wire services
Padres lefthander David Wells, known for larger-than-life appetites for food and beer, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. San Diego chief executive officer Sandy Alderson, speaking at Padres camp in Peoria, Ariz., yesterday, termed the illness controllable, but said: "It's something he'll have to manage and something we'll have to help him manage. It's not unprecedented by any means. " Wells was diagnosed two weeks ago, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported in yesterday's editions.
SPORTS
March 5, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
Georgetown's leading scorer Austin Freeman has been diagnosed with diabetes, leaving his status uncertain for the team's upcoming games. Freeman returned to practice Wednesday and yesterday after missing Monday night's loss to West Virginia. He was also limited in Saturday's loss to Notre Dame. Originally thought to have a stomach virus, Freeman learned he had diabetes when he went to the hospital Monday night. Coach John Thompson III said yesterday he is "100 percent" certain Freeman will play again this season, but the coach wouldn't say whether the junior guard will return for tomorrow's regular-season finale against Cincinnati.
SPORTS
October 1, 2004 | By Tom McGurk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Tom Benson needed a favor, and he went to the Triton field hockey team for help. With the same enthusiasm he uses to teach history at the Runnemede-based school, Benson told the Mustangs of his grandson Chris' battle with juvenile diabetes. He asked the players if they would help him in his quest to help find a cure for the disease. "When he sat down and talked to us, we were definitely in," junior captain Diana Hunt said. "Mr. Benson is such a lively individual - as a teacher and a person.
NEWS
October 7, 2011
The Food and Drug Administration approved the first combination drug to treat type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol in one tablet. Merck & Co. Inc.'s Juvisync combines two previously approved prescription medicines in one tablet for adults who need both sitagliptin and simvastatin. About 20 million Americans have type 2 diabetes and many have high cholesterol.    - David Sell
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2007
ERIK CHOPIN, 37, a Long Island, N.Y., delicatessen owner and family man, once carried more than 400 pounds on his 6-foot frame. The extreme weight was obvious, but what Erik didn't know was that he also had high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes. Not to mention a body mass index of 55, a far cry from the recommended range of 18.5 to 24.9. Erik was just about to go under the knife for bariatric surgery when he was selected by lottery to be on NBC's "The Biggest Loser" last season.
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
When Dorothy Leese was a little girl in the 1940s, her parents would boil 10 drops of her urine in a pan on the stove every day. And when Dorothy's pals would come to visit, she'd tell them "we're doing a chemical experiment. " Because her body didn't produce insulin, her parents went to the local butcher in Newark, N.J., and squeezed the pancreas of a dead cow or pig to retrieve the animal's insulin. This impure substance was injected in her arms and legs, leaving ridges and dents where the animal's foreign tissue was not absorbed by her body.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2012
DO IT RIGHT The versatile push-up is a favorite of mine. Do it anywhere and modify to any fitness level - against a wall, with bent knees on the floor, one-arm, dumbbell row, alligator, triceps, plyometric push-ups or 3-point, to name a few. The classic: Start on your hands and knees. With hands slightly wider than shoulder-width apart, feet together, shift weight onto your hands and feet and rise into an up plank position. Keeping your body and head straight, slowly lower your body to the ground by bending your elbows.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For Christina Williams, 19, rebellion against type 1 diabetes set in during her middle school years. "I would refuse to test, refuse to give myself my insulin doses," the Pennsburg teen said. "I wanted to have a normal life and live just like my friends without diabetes. " The result was consistently elevated blood glucose, which translated into constant tiredness for Williams, a competitive swimmer. What finally turned the Lock Haven University sophomore around was her diabetes educator telling her during her freshman year of high school that if she wanted to think about driving a car, she had to lower her A1C, the test that shows the average of blood glucose readings spanning three months.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
TO HEAR his advocates tell it, Mumia Abu-Jamal is still in danger, even after being discharged from a small-town hospital in the Coal Region. "When we saw the state he was in, it's very clear what's happening here," Pam Africa, a member of MOVE and longtime Abu-Jamal supporter, told the Daily News yesterday. "They're trying to kill Mumia," she said of the staff at the state correctional institution at Mahanoy. Africa said Abu-Jamal, 60, was taken back to the prison early yesterday from Schuylkill Medical Center, located about 10 miles away in Pottsville.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2015
WE AMERICANS pride ourselves on doing everything big: We eat more supersized meals, we spend more money, we spend more time in front of our TV/computer/movie screens, and we even work more hours than our European cousins. There's just one problem: We're becoming increasingly less active, and inactivity increases our risk for diabetes, heart disease and stroke, to name a few illnesses and conditions. To help you take the first important steps to a healthier lifestyle, join the millions of Americans across the nation today, April 1, as we celebrate National Walking Day, a health initiative sponsored by the American Heart Association.
NEWS
April 2, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
POTTSVILLE, Pa. - Convicted cop killer Mumia Abu-Jamal is in intensive care for treatment of diabetes and is "not doing well," his family said Tuesday. Abu-Jamal, 60, was taken from the state Correctional Institution-Mahanoy to Schuylkill Medical Center in Pottsville on Monday after passing out, his wife, Wadiya Jamal, said outside the hospital. His blood sugar level was very high, 779, when he arrived at the hospital and remains above 300, she said. Anything above 186 is considered dangerously high.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Managing diabetes can be tough. Tracking weight, monitoring glucose levels, counting carbohydrate consumption, and getting adequate exercise can tax even the most obsessively compulsive personalities, leading to fatigue or burnout when it no longer seems possible or even valuable to stick with the program. "The problem with diabetes is that it never goes away," said endocrinologist Mark Schutta. "It's a lifestyle disease, and it's challenging to lose weight, to take several medications, to monitor blood sugars.
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Arleen Marcia Tuchman, For The Inquirer
    Lord, I'm sick an' down Can't tell my head from my feet Lord, I'm sick an' down Can't hardly tell my head from my feet Well, I got the sugar diabetes Somebody please. Lord have mercy on me. When Delta Blues guitarist and singer Big Joe Williams sang "Sugar Diabetes Blues" on his posthumous 1999 album, Going Back to Crawford , he was singing about a problem haunting his Mississippi hometown, the Delta, and the nation. As of 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported, 20.9 million Americans had diabetes, a nearly fourfold increase since 1980.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
A few things I adore: butter pecan ice cream, fresh-baked sourdough bread, and peaches. A few things I no longer eat: butter pecan ice cream, fresh-baked sourdough bread, and peaches. (OK, I did indulge in a scoop of homemade butter pecan in Cape May over the summer, which I downed in record time. But it was the first time I had eaten ice cream in a year.) I'm not talking about giving up gluten or going on a weird crash diet. Not even about the currently trendy paleo lifestyle.
NEWS
October 21, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like many 11-year-olds, Morgan Laufgraben of Cherry Hill enjoys playing soccer. She is a member of a travel team, the Blades. Morgan's parents, however, unlike other spectators in the stands, are eager not only to watch the team score goals but also to hear their daughter's insulin levels shouted out by the coaches during game breaks. The Beck Middle School sixth-grader was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2012. Through her meal planning and frequent insulin checks for a disease that is currently incurable, Morgan's family said she had maintained a positive outlook.
SPORTS
October 11, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
Quinn Collins knew it was important to give Jimmy Reardon some advice. Collins is the Delsea football team's starting quarterback. Jimmy is a 7-year-old who lives in Franklinville and is a big fan of the Crusaders. But Collins' message didn't have anything to do with football or sports. It was more important than that. "He's so young, I just wanted him to know that there was nothing he couldn't do," Collins said. "People have said that to me, and I wanted to make sure he heard that from me. " Collins, a junior, has Type 1 diabetes.
SPORTS
October 2, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
ZACK BAMBARY is different. Not because he's a former walk-on who became enough of a contributor on Temple's special teams to earn a scholarship this season from coach Matt Rhule. And not because the finance major already has a job offer from pharmaceutical giant Merck whenever he enters the real world and starts working for a living. No, Bambary is different because he has diabetes, a disease that impacts nearly 10 percent of the American population and is the seventh-leading cause of death in this country.
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