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Diabetes

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NEWS
June 19, 2012 | Wires
Question: Can intense itching be a side effect for someone with diabetes whose blood sugars are poorly controlled? Answer: Poorly controlled diabetes is one possible cause for unexplained itching. Exactly how diabetes causes itching isn't certain, but suggested causes include diabetic nerve root injury, metabolic abnormalities from widely fluctuating blood sugars, and dry skin. If this is the cause, it should improve with better efforts to lower the blood sugars.   That said, there are many other causes for severe itching.
NEWS
January 22, 1998 | By Frank Bertucci, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Kevin Montgomery, 17, never let diabetes prevent him from keeping an appointment, whether it was a basketball game or a performance in a school play. Montgomery, of Levittown, a senior at Holy Ghost Prep who was manager of the basketball team, died of a diabetic attack at his home Tuesday afternoon, after returning from school where he had taken midterm exams in the morning. He was found by his younger brother. "People who knew him knew this was a serious problem," said Tony Chapman, Holy Ghost's basketball coach.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2008
THRIVING WITH TYPE 1 CATHERINE MILLER, who is 26 and lives in West Chester, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 15. "I wasn't really surprised because my mom has it, my grandmother and grandfather had it, a couple of my uncles have it, so it was inevitable for at least me or my brother to get it, and I was the lucky one. " It threw her for a loop initially. "I was 15 and they were giving me all sorts of medication," she says. "But I knew it was going to come. " Taking the time to eat right for blood-sugar control was her major challenge as a teenager.
SPORTS
March 20, 2007 | Inquirer wire services
Padres lefthander David Wells, known for larger-than-life appetites for food and beer, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. San Diego chief executive officer Sandy Alderson, speaking at Padres camp in Peoria, Ariz., yesterday, termed the illness controllable, but said: "It's something he'll have to manage and something we'll have to help him manage. It's not unprecedented by any means. " Wells was diagnosed two weeks ago, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported in yesterday's editions.
SPORTS
March 5, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
Georgetown's leading scorer Austin Freeman has been diagnosed with diabetes, leaving his status uncertain for the team's upcoming games. Freeman returned to practice Wednesday and yesterday after missing Monday night's loss to West Virginia. He was also limited in Saturday's loss to Notre Dame. Originally thought to have a stomach virus, Freeman learned he had diabetes when he went to the hospital Monday night. Coach John Thompson III said yesterday he is "100 percent" certain Freeman will play again this season, but the coach wouldn't say whether the junior guard will return for tomorrow's regular-season finale against Cincinnati.
SPORTS
October 1, 2004 | By Tom McGurk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Tom Benson needed a favor, and he went to the Triton field hockey team for help. With the same enthusiasm he uses to teach history at the Runnemede-based school, Benson told the Mustangs of his grandson Chris' battle with juvenile diabetes. He asked the players if they would help him in his quest to help find a cure for the disease. "When he sat down and talked to us, we were definitely in," junior captain Diana Hunt said. "Mr. Benson is such a lively individual - as a teacher and a person.
NEWS
October 7, 2011
The Food and Drug Administration approved the first combination drug to treat type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol in one tablet. Merck & Co. Inc.'s Juvisync combines two previously approved prescription medicines in one tablet for adults who need both sitagliptin and simvastatin. About 20 million Americans have type 2 diabetes and many have high cholesterol.    - David Sell
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2007
ERIK CHOPIN, 37, a Long Island, N.Y., delicatessen owner and family man, once carried more than 400 pounds on his 6-foot frame. The extreme weight was obvious, but what Erik didn't know was that he also had high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes. Not to mention a body mass index of 55, a far cry from the recommended range of 18.5 to 24.9. Erik was just about to go under the knife for bariatric surgery when he was selected by lottery to be on NBC's "The Biggest Loser" last season.
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
When Dorothy Leese was a little girl in the 1940s, her parents would boil 10 drops of her urine in a pan on the stove every day. And when Dorothy's pals would come to visit, she'd tell them "we're doing a chemical experiment. " Because her body didn't produce insulin, her parents went to the local butcher in Newark, N.J., and squeezed the pancreas of a dead cow or pig to retrieve the animal's insulin. This impure substance was injected in her arms and legs, leaving ridges and dents where the animal's foreign tissue was not absorbed by her body.
NEWS
June 17, 2003
Exotic diseases such as SARS, monkey pox and West Nile virus are guaranteed to get exhaustive media coverage and intense public attention. They're dangerous, scary and, if you cross paths with the wrong cougher, mosquito or prairie dog, hard to prevent. Not that we shouldn't all be on the lookout for unusual germs, but Americans would be wise to pay far more attention to a preventable disease that threatens millions. It's name is diabetes, an old disease spread not by germs but, for the most part, overindulgent modern lifestyles.
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NEWS
July 30, 2014
I DIDN'T THINK you could sweat in a swimming pool. "You're at 50 percent, now push it to 80 percent," my water-fitness instructor yells over the blaring music. The tempo is about to increase. Those of us in the class prepare for what's next with groans. "Take it to 100 percent," shouts Trevin Green, water-fitness coordinator at the Theresa Banks Memorial Aquatics Center in Maryland. He's on the pool deck demonstrating how fast he wants us to go on our Hydrorider aqua bikes. Water splashes as we all try to pedal faster, going nowhere but burning hundreds of calories.
NEWS
June 25, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
When Maria Colon was growing up in Puerto Rico, people didn't talk much about diabetes. "It was like a secret," recalls the Williamstown resident, 57, who has worked on the front lines against the disease in Camden since 2001. In recent years, diabetes has become a headline-generating epidemic. It affects 29.1 million Americans, most of whom are susceptible to the elevated blood-sugar disorder because of heredity and a sedentary, high-calorie lifestyle. But more exercise and less sugar can help a patient avoid expensive complications - and can help prevent a condition called prediabetes from converting into the full-blown disease.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drugmaker Merck & Co. has narrowed its research focus in the hope of raising profit, but type 2 diabetes remains part of the program because the market is huge and will likely grow as Americans and people in other countries get older and heavier. Merck said Friday that it would create a "global registry" of about 20,000 patients to evaluate their real-world experience with medication, blood sugar levels, diet, exercise, use of health care, and quality of life. Merck will collaborate with academic researchers at more than 900 sites in the United States, Germany, France, and Japan.
SPORTS
June 1, 2014 | BY ANDREW ALBERT, Daily News Staff Writer alberta@phillynews.com
IT IS DAUNTING to look at, and even more scary to think about. The Manayunk Wall, as it is known, is a task in itself to navigate. Some of the best cyclers in the world will find that out tomorrow, as the Parx Casino Philly Cycling Classic is back for another year. Twenty-four women's and 19 men's cycling teams from all across the world will come to Philadelphia to see which male and female rider can take home the two $31,000 top prizes. One of the men's teams, Team Novo Nordisk, has turned its general disadvantage on the course to an inspiration for all. The team, founded by Phil Southerland in 2012, is composed of cyclists who have Type 1 diabetes.
NEWS
May 11, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Harriton girls' lacrosse players dropped their equipment bags behind the bench Wednesday, ditching them on the track that bordered Upper Darby's field. Each player's uniform number was labeled on the front of the bag. But besides that, the two dozen Under Armour black backpacks were almost identical. The contents zippered inside the front pouch of No. 23 were what set Hilary Lemonick's apart. An oversize pack of Starburst candies. Juice boxes. A bottle of Gatorade. It looked like a little kid's lunch box, she said.
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Diagnoses of Type 1 diabetes in Philadelphia children younger than 5 jumped 70 percent between 1985 and 2004, according to the Philadelphia Pediatric Diabetes Registry. New data show such cases continued to climb between 2005 and 2009. "Our new research shows that the incidence in very young children, under the age of 5, is continuing to increase," says Terri Lipman, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing who maintains the only registry in the United States that since 1985 has continually collected information on children with diabetes.
NEWS
March 4, 2014 | BY DUSTY NIX
YOU'RE at the pharmacy to pick up your diabetes medication. The pharmacist takes a look at you and at your prescription, and refuses to fill it. Why? Is it expired, or maybe you're out of refills? No, the prescription is valid and current. But the pharmacist has decided that your Type II diabetes is something you brought on yourself, and because of his deeply held moral and religious objection to the sin of gluttony, he doesn't have to serve you. (At this point, the HIV-positive guy in line behind you is getting nervous.)
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
When she was 13, Elizabeth Welsh entered a road race in Norristown. When she saw the huge trophy for the top female finisher, she made a vow: "I'm going to get that. " Welsh kept that promise, passing, among others, a fortysomething man to win the overall title. That trophy is in the bedroom of the house where she grew up in Haverford, draped with the many ribbons and medals she has won since in rowing and running contests. Welsh, 27, now lives in Fairmount. In May, she will receive her nurse practitioner degree from Villanova University, where she has been studying hard, perfecting clinical skills, and teaching nursing undergrads to earn her tuition.
NEWS
January 19, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A number of credible but controversial studies in recent years have found that people with certain chronic illnesses live longer if they're carrying too many pounds than if they're of "normal" weight. Now, Harvard University researchers have weighed in on the "obesity paradox" with a study that concludes diabetics who are too heavy get no survival benefit. On the contrary, the heavier the diabetic, the likelier an early death. "These data dispel the notion that being overweight or obese confers a survival advantage among diabetics," said Frank B. Hu, a Harvard professor of nutrition and epidemiology.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2013 | By Matthew Perrone, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration is cracking down on more than a dozen companies that market illegal diabetes treatments, ranging from bogus dietary supplements to prescription drugs sold online without a prescription. The products aim to cash in on the country's diabetes epidemic, which affects nearly 26 million Americans. Regulators worry that consumers who buy such unapproved products could put off getting legitimate medical care. The FDA sent warning letters to 15 companies, here and abroad, ordering them to stop selling diabetes treatments that violate U.S. drug laws.
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