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Diabetes

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NEWS
June 19, 2012 | Wires
Question: Can intense itching be a side effect for someone with diabetes whose blood sugars are poorly controlled? Answer: Poorly controlled diabetes is one possible cause for unexplained itching. Exactly how diabetes causes itching isn't certain, but suggested causes include diabetic nerve root injury, metabolic abnormalities from widely fluctuating blood sugars, and dry skin. If this is the cause, it should improve with better efforts to lower the blood sugars.   That said, there are many other causes for severe itching.
NEWS
January 22, 1998 | By Frank Bertucci, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Kevin Montgomery, 17, never let diabetes prevent him from keeping an appointment, whether it was a basketball game or a performance in a school play. Montgomery, of Levittown, a senior at Holy Ghost Prep who was manager of the basketball team, died of a diabetic attack at his home Tuesday afternoon, after returning from school where he had taken midterm exams in the morning. He was found by his younger brother. "People who knew him knew this was a serious problem," said Tony Chapman, Holy Ghost's basketball coach.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2008
THRIVING WITH TYPE 1 CATHERINE MILLER, who is 26 and lives in West Chester, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 15. "I wasn't really surprised because my mom has it, my grandmother and grandfather had it, a couple of my uncles have it, so it was inevitable for at least me or my brother to get it, and I was the lucky one. " It threw her for a loop initially. "I was 15 and they were giving me all sorts of medication," she says. "But I knew it was going to come. " Taking the time to eat right for blood-sugar control was her major challenge as a teenager.
SPORTS
March 20, 2007 | Inquirer wire services
Padres lefthander David Wells, known for larger-than-life appetites for food and beer, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. San Diego chief executive officer Sandy Alderson, speaking at Padres camp in Peoria, Ariz., yesterday, termed the illness controllable, but said: "It's something he'll have to manage and something we'll have to help him manage. It's not unprecedented by any means. " Wells was diagnosed two weeks ago, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported in yesterday's editions.
SPORTS
March 5, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
Georgetown's leading scorer Austin Freeman has been diagnosed with diabetes, leaving his status uncertain for the team's upcoming games. Freeman returned to practice Wednesday and yesterday after missing Monday night's loss to West Virginia. He was also limited in Saturday's loss to Notre Dame. Originally thought to have a stomach virus, Freeman learned he had diabetes when he went to the hospital Monday night. Coach John Thompson III said yesterday he is "100 percent" certain Freeman will play again this season, but the coach wouldn't say whether the junior guard will return for tomorrow's regular-season finale against Cincinnati.
SPORTS
October 1, 2004 | By Tom McGurk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Tom Benson needed a favor, and he went to the Triton field hockey team for help. With the same enthusiasm he uses to teach history at the Runnemede-based school, Benson told the Mustangs of his grandson Chris' battle with juvenile diabetes. He asked the players if they would help him in his quest to help find a cure for the disease. "When he sat down and talked to us, we were definitely in," junior captain Diana Hunt said. "Mr. Benson is such a lively individual - as a teacher and a person.
NEWS
October 7, 2011
The Food and Drug Administration approved the first combination drug to treat type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol in one tablet. Merck & Co. Inc.'s Juvisync combines two previously approved prescription medicines in one tablet for adults who need both sitagliptin and simvastatin. About 20 million Americans have type 2 diabetes and many have high cholesterol.    - David Sell
NEWS
March 13, 2016 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Poorly controlled diabetes can spawn a host of medical problems that can lead to amputations, but generally, a triad of issues tend to be present. Neuropathy, a nerve condition that numbs the feet and toes, can prevent people with diabetes from feeling pain in their toes or feet, which which could lead to their not knowing about injuries, or neglecting them. Circulation problems may interfere with wound healing, which, in turn, can lead to sepsis, or overwhelming infections. And a slowed down immune response means that many with diabetes have trouble fighting off infections, which can lead to amputations.
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
When Dorothy Leese was a little girl in the 1940s, her parents would boil 10 drops of her urine in a pan on the stove every day. And when Dorothy's pals would come to visit, she'd tell them "we're doing a chemical experiment. " Because her body didn't produce insulin, her parents went to the local butcher in Newark, N.J., and squeezed the pancreas of a dead cow or pig to retrieve the animal's insulin. This impure substance was injected in her arms and legs, leaving ridges and dents where the animal's foreign tissue was not absorbed by her body.
NEWS
June 17, 2003
Exotic diseases such as SARS, monkey pox and West Nile virus are guaranteed to get exhaustive media coverage and intense public attention. They're dangerous, scary and, if you cross paths with the wrong cougher, mosquito or prairie dog, hard to prevent. Not that we shouldn't all be on the lookout for unusual germs, but Americans would be wise to pay far more attention to a preventable disease that threatens millions. It's name is diabetes, an old disease spread not by germs but, for the most part, overindulgent modern lifestyles.
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NEWS
September 11, 2016 | By Mike Natter, For The Inquirer
The screams of another child woke me from a restless sleep. When I opened my eyes, I found tubes and wires stuck all over my 9-year-old body. "Where am I?" I thought, watching a stretcher wheel by carrying a young boy, head wrapped in bloody gauze. The last thing I could remember was my father carrying me into the emergency room. It had been months since I slept through the night, because I had to keep getting up to use the bathroom due to the countless glasses of water I was chugging.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2016 | By Kimberly Garrison
NAKED YOGA, pole dancing, Zumba, belly dancing, cardio striptease, and whatever the latest fitness fad is - you've tried it, right? There's only one problem: Fitness fads come, but they mostly go. In other words, they're just not sustainable. Fortunately for you, a simple secret can transform your fitness forever. What's the secret? Drumroll please ... walking. Agreed, walking is not a sexy workout. It's so well, simple, right? Believe it or not, as little as 30 minutes a day of sustained walking could do wonders for your fitness and your health, too. Why 30 minutes?
NEWS
August 4, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
A widely prescribed diabetes drug that has shown potential for helping weakened hearts failed to reduce deaths or rehospitalizations in a study of patients with advanced heart failure. There was a trend toward worse outcomes among the heart-failure patients who also had diabetes, but this could have occurred by chance. The clinical trial of 300 patients, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association, was led by the University of Pennsylvania and involved 24 U.S. centers, including Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Temple University Hospital, and Lancaster Heart and Stroke Foundation.
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
People with type 2 diabetes, the kind you are more likely to get as an adult, are at risk for a host of additional medical problems. Stroke and heart attack. Kidney disease. Blindness. Skin infections. Numbness in the feet. Add one more you and even your doctor may not have heard is connected: dementia. Diabetes at least doubles your risk of developing it. Even diabetics without dementia can have subtle cognitive problems. "Your average diabetologist, internal medicine doctor, they're still not aware of that information," said Luke Stoeckel, a neuropsychologist at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
NEWS
June 26, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Earlier this month, a major new study brought hopeful news about type 2 diabetes. Nationwide, nearly 30 million people have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. The vast majority of them have type 2 diabetes, a chronic condition in which blood glucose - sugar - builds up because the body doesn't properly use the regulatory hormone insulin. Once known as "adult-onset" diabetes, the diagnosis is rising swiftly and now affects all ages. It is related to lifestyle - poor diet and lack of exercise.
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Erika Totten doesn't really remember the car crash. She recalls leaving her friend's house in Pennsylvania with her 2-year-old twins in the back of the car and heading back to her home in North Hanover, N.J. She vaguely remembers feeling a little confused, and a little lost. But the next thing she knew, she had run the car into a ditch, the police and ambulance arrived, and she was on her way to the hospital. No one was hurt. But the accident wasn't really a surprise. Totten had developed Type 1 diabetes at 21 after a severe case of mononucleosis that might have wiped out her insulin-producing beta cells.
NEWS
May 17, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX Reducing the levy would harm the city I urge City Council President Darrell L. Clarke to support Mayor Kenney's proposed 3-cents-an-ounce tax on sugary beverages instead of cutting it to 1 cent an ounce or less ("Clarke floats smaller drink tax," Thursday). This tax would improve the health of thousands of Philadelphians. It would help, not harm, those being singled out as likely to be hurt by this tax. Many people do not understand the harmful effects of sugar, including weight gain and diabetes.
NEWS
March 13, 2016 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Poorly controlled diabetes can spawn a host of medical problems that can lead to amputations, but generally, a triad of issues tend to be present. Neuropathy, a nerve condition that numbs the feet and toes, can prevent people with diabetes from feeling pain in their toes or feet, which which could lead to their not knowing about injuries, or neglecting them. Circulation problems may interfere with wound healing, which, in turn, can lead to sepsis, or overwhelming infections. And a slowed down immune response means that many with diabetes have trouble fighting off infections, which can lead to amputations.
SPORTS
March 11, 2016 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
AT LEAST some of her sponsors recognize Maria Sharapova for the cheater that she is. Sharapova, the elegant and lovely Russian tennis champion, will be banned by the International Tennis Federation from 6 months to 4 years for testing positive for newly-banned meldonium at the Australian Open in January. It is a drug that the Women's Tennis Association warned players about five times in December. Sharapova said she missed the memo. She also said she has taken it for 10 years to address medical conditions, chief among them pre-diabetes.
NEWS
February 20, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Before he died early last year of pancreatic cancer, Stephen T. Johnson filed a lawsuit against Merck for not telling him his disease might be a side effect of taking Januvia, the company's blockbuster diabetes drug. The 63-year-old Philadelphia police officer knew his life was at an end, but he wanted the product labeling changed to warn other diabetics. "He worked his whole life. He didn't need the money," said his son, Stephen T. Johnson Jr., also a Philadelphia police officer.
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