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Diabetes Care

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NEWS
November 18, 2011 | By Christina Hernandez Sherwood, For The Inquirer
A health coalition in Camden won a $3.45 million grant Thursday to strengthen diabetes care in a city where rates far exceed the national average, adding to medical costs and detracting from residents' quality of life. The grant from the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation is intended to enhance and deepen a three-year-old, citywide diabetes collaborative, officials said. Most of the money will go to two or three primary-care practices, expected to be chosen next month. It will allow them to individualize care by, for example, hiring nurse coordinators to track diabetics, and peer educators to help patients navigate the health-care system.
NEWS
November 17, 2011 | By Christina Hernandez Sherwood, FOR THE INQUIRER
A health coalition in Camden won a $3.45 million grant Thursday to strengthen diabetes care in a city where rates far exceed the national average, adding to medical costs and detracting from residents' quality of life. The grant, from the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, is intended to enhance and deepen a three-year-old, citywide diabetes collaborative, officials said at an evening meeting. Most of the money will go to two or three primary-care practices, expected to be chosen next month.
NEWS
August 27, 2000
Inside Help. Bensalem police are enlisting hairstylists in their effort to halt domestic violence; "Women will tell their hairdressers things they'd never tell anyone else," said Officer Marilyn MacDougall . . . Diabetes. It soared 33 percent nationally - 70 percent among people in their 30s - during the 1990s, according to poll results published in the journal Diabetes Care; health experts blame widespread obesity . . . Top-rated. Wednesday night's finale to the CBS series "Survivor" attracted more viewers (51.7 million)
NEWS
February 10, 2012
IT IS VERY unfortunate that Philadelphia has decided to reduce the number of school nurses. All children benefit from the expertise provided by the school nurse. However, for the child with diabetes, a number of other caregivers can be trained to administer insulin and to recognize and treat low blood sugar. Parents of newly diagnosed children with diabetes quickly learn to care for their child. They also train others, such as family members and babysitters, to provide care. And, of course, older children can usually administer their own insulin.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Linda Siminerio and Alan L. Yatvin
Sending children off to school and letting someone else take responsibility for them is never easy. It's especially hard when a child has a condition, such as diabetes, that requires medication and other care during the day. Parents should feel confident that schools can provide that care, and, indeed, federal law requires them to. But how? More school nurses would benefit all children, including those with chronic conditions. Unfortunately, though, nurses haven't been available in every Pennsylvania school for decades; in some, they never were.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A quarter of nursing home residents have diabetes, but doctors are only now recognizing that they may need different medical treatment than younger people with the disease. Elbert Huang, a University of Chicago primary care doctor who conducts diabetes research, bemoans the fact that clinical trials rarely include elderly diabetics even though nearly half of people with diabetes are over 65. Three recent, large trials of measures to keep tight control of blood sugar did include older people but yielded either detrimental results or no benefit.
NEWS
February 26, 2002 | Daily News wire services
Hard to make a case for a diet of sausage A diet heavy in processed meats, including hot dogs and bacon, increases the risk of type 2 diabetes by about 50 percent in men, researchers say. Harvard School of Public Health scientists analyzed the eating habits of thousands of men and found that those who frequently ate bacon, hot dogs, sausage, baloney or other processed meats were 46 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than...
NEWS
August 14, 2006 | By John Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a mob scene worthy of Brad Pitt or Angelina Jolie. Nearly 1,000 people pushed into a Washington ballroom at the American Diabetes Association's annual convention, causing security guards to turn people away. The object of adoration wasn't a movie star or even a person, but rather a diabetes drug called Byetta, which helps to lower blood sugar. The new drug sold nearly $100 million in the last three months, partly because of an intriguing side effect: It helps people lose weight.
LIVING
November 27, 2000 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Doctors know that overweight children are at greater risk for developing Type 2 diabetes - once called adult-onset diabetes. But new research raises the question of whether obesity could also be a factor in the rarer Type 1 diabetes, which used to be called juvenile diabetes. A Finnish study, published today in the journal Diabetes Care, indicated that overweight children older than 3 were more than twice as likely to develop Type 1. The possible obesity connection is of interest to researchers who have been grappling with a 33 percent surge in diabetes prevalence among American adults during the 1990s and the alarming recent appearance of Type 2 diabetes among children.
NEWS
November 17, 2008 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Diabetes has cost Robert Heard dearly. His left leg was amputated below the knee two years ago. Kidney failure - with its special diets, thrice-weekly dialysis, and ever-present threats of infection - is worse. "It breaks you down mentally," says Heard, 32, who has been waiting for a second kidney transplant since the first, donated by his uncle, failed four years ago. Heard was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 10, and said he managed it well for 15 years until, as an adult, he changed jobs and lost his health insurance.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A quarter of nursing home residents have diabetes, but doctors are only now recognizing that they may need different medical treatment than younger people with the disease. Elbert Huang, a University of Chicago primary care doctor who conducts diabetes research, bemoans the fact that clinical trials rarely include elderly diabetics even though nearly half of people with diabetes are over 65. Three recent, large trials of measures to keep tight control of blood sugar did include older people but yielded either detrimental results or no benefit.
NEWS
February 10, 2012
IT IS VERY unfortunate that Philadelphia has decided to reduce the number of school nurses. All children benefit from the expertise provided by the school nurse. However, for the child with diabetes, a number of other caregivers can be trained to administer insulin and to recognize and treat low blood sugar. Parents of newly diagnosed children with diabetes quickly learn to care for their child. They also train others, such as family members and babysitters, to provide care. And, of course, older children can usually administer their own insulin.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Linda Siminerio and Alan L. Yatvin
Sending children off to school and letting someone else take responsibility for them is never easy. It's especially hard when a child has a condition, such as diabetes, that requires medication and other care during the day. Parents should feel confident that schools can provide that care, and, indeed, federal law requires them to. But how? More school nurses would benefit all children, including those with chronic conditions. Unfortunately, though, nurses haven't been available in every Pennsylvania school for decades; in some, they never were.
NEWS
November 18, 2011 | By Christina Hernandez Sherwood, For The Inquirer
A health coalition in Camden won a $3.45 million grant Thursday to strengthen diabetes care in a city where rates far exceed the national average, adding to medical costs and detracting from residents' quality of life. The grant from the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation is intended to enhance and deepen a three-year-old, citywide diabetes collaborative, officials said. Most of the money will go to two or three primary-care practices, expected to be chosen next month. It will allow them to individualize care by, for example, hiring nurse coordinators to track diabetics, and peer educators to help patients navigate the health-care system.
NEWS
November 17, 2011 | By Christina Hernandez Sherwood, FOR THE INQUIRER
A health coalition in Camden won a $3.45 million grant Thursday to strengthen diabetes care in a city where rates far exceed the national average, adding to medical costs and detracting from residents' quality of life. The grant, from the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, is intended to enhance and deepen a three-year-old, citywide diabetes collaborative, officials said at an evening meeting. Most of the money will go to two or three primary-care practices, expected to be chosen next month.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Inquirer
Arthur Chernoff has a dream, one that he feels will ease a lot of angst for diabetics and other chronically ill patients, and when he talks about it, he sounds almost as animated as the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. did describing his own dream. "Doctors and insurers should be doing more to lower the barriers to effective health care, instead of raising the barriers," said Chernoff, chairman of the Division of Endocrinology at Albert Einstein Medical Center. What Chernoff proposes is a sort of "diabetes passport," a way for patients to reach more easily the many doctors they need to see. Because the disease ravages so many body systems, diabetics may need, besides primary-care doctors, a phalanx of specialists such as endocrinologists, cardiologists, podiatrists, ophthalmologists or nephrologists, not to mention dietitians or other health professionals.
NEWS
November 17, 2008 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Diabetes has cost Robert Heard dearly. His left leg was amputated below the knee two years ago. Kidney failure - with its special diets, thrice-weekly dialysis, and ever-present threats of infection - is worse. "It breaks you down mentally," says Heard, 32, who has been waiting for a second kidney transplant since the first, donated by his uncle, failed four years ago. Heard was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 10, and said he managed it well for 15 years until, as an adult, he changed jobs and lost his health insurance.
FOOD
April 10, 2008 | By Carolyn Poirot, FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM
Chia seeds are best known for providing the fast-growing greenery on little clay "pets," but it's time to start thinking of them as a supergrain. Chia reportedly contains more omega-3 fatty acids than flaxseed, more fiber than bran, and more protein than soy. One 3.5-ounce serving (about one-fourth of a cup) of Salba - the variety of chia used in a new study published in the November issue of Diabetes Care - gives you as much calcium as three cups of milk, has as much omega-3 fatty acids as 28 ounces of salmon, and is higher in antioxidants than blueberries, says Vladimir Vuksan, the University of Toronto researcher who led the study.
NEWS
June 19, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia police have made "significant improvements" in the way they process and care for people with diabetes held in lockups, the final report of a court-appointed monitor concludes. The report by a team of monitors for the American Diabetes Association was filed Friday in federal court, seven years after civil rights lawyers sued for a Philadelphia cabaret owner with diabetes who said he nearly died after he was arrested over a liquor-code violation, held for almost 24 hours, and denied access to insulin, blood-pressure medicine and medical care.
NEWS
August 14, 2006 | By John Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a mob scene worthy of Brad Pitt or Angelina Jolie. Nearly 1,000 people pushed into a Washington ballroom at the American Diabetes Association's annual convention, causing security guards to turn people away. The object of adoration wasn't a movie star or even a person, but rather a diabetes drug called Byetta, which helps to lower blood sugar. The new drug sold nearly $100 million in the last three months, partly because of an intriguing side effect: It helps people lose weight.
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