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Diabetes Care

FOOD
April 10, 2008 | By Carolyn Poirot, FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM
Chia seeds are best known for providing the fast-growing greenery on little clay "pets," but it's time to start thinking of them as a supergrain. Chia reportedly contains more omega-3 fatty acids than flaxseed, more fiber than bran, and more protein than soy. One 3.5-ounce serving (about one-fourth of a cup) of Salba - the variety of chia used in a new study published in the November issue of Diabetes Care - gives you as much calcium as three cups of milk, has as much omega-3 fatty acids as 28 ounces of salmon, and is higher in antioxidants than blueberries, says Vladimir Vuksan, the University of Toronto researcher who led the study.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Inquirer
Arthur Chernoff has a dream, one that he feels will ease a lot of angst for diabetics and other chronically ill patients, and when he talks about it, he sounds almost as animated as the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. did describing his own dream. "Doctors and insurers should be doing more to lower the barriers to effective health care, instead of raising the barriers," said Chernoff, chairman of the Division of Endocrinology at Albert Einstein Medical Center. What Chernoff proposes is a sort of "diabetes passport," a way for patients to reach more easily the many doctors they need to see. Because the disease ravages so many body systems, diabetics may need, besides primary-care doctors, a phalanx of specialists such as endocrinologists, cardiologists, podiatrists, ophthalmologists or nephrologists, not to mention dietitians or other health professionals.
NEWS
June 19, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia police have made "significant improvements" in the way they process and care for people with diabetes held in lockups, the final report of a court-appointed monitor concludes. The report by a team of monitors for the American Diabetes Association was filed Friday in federal court, seven years after civil rights lawyers sued for a Philadelphia cabaret owner with diabetes who said he nearly died after he was arrested over a liquor-code violation, held for almost 24 hours, and denied access to insulin, blood-pressure medicine and medical care.
NEWS
August 8, 2002 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eating a meal when it is convenient. Indulging in sweets once considered off-limits. Waking up less often at night to go to the bathroom. Such are the little pleasures that make diabetes an ever more manageable disease. As the American Association of Diabetes Educators gathers in Philadelphia this week, the good news is that new treatments allow people with diabetes to live better. The bad news is that more Americans - more overweight than ever - are getting diabetes, and getting it earlier in life.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2013
National Liberty Museum, Philadelphia, elected the following to its executive board of directors for a three-year term: Steven K. Leff, a licensed CPA with Mayer Hoffman & McCann P.C. and a senior managing director of the Philadelphia office of CBIZ MHM L.L.C.; Nicole L. LeVine, manager of Peco's Operations Control Center; Beth Galvin, a principal with Ernst & Young L.L.P. and leader of the firm's international tax transfer pricing practice in Philadelphia; Susan M. Stevens, US Airways' director of inflight services; and Alex Friedman , founder of Checker Cab Philadelphia and All City Taxi in Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Want to know your chances of dying in the next 10 years? Here are bad signs: getting winded walking several blocks, smoking, having trouble pushing a chair across the room. That's according to a "mortality index" developed by San Francisco researchers for people older than 50. The test scores may satisfy people's morbid curiosity, but the researchers say their 12-item index is mostly for use by doctors. It can help them decide whether costly health screenings or medical procedures are worth the risk for patients unlikely to live 10 more years.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Johnson & Johnson has named a Bayer Group executive to a new post responsible for J&J's troubled McNeil consumer-health facility in Fort Washington. Sandra E. Peterson, chief executive of Bayer CropScience A.G. in Europe, will join J&J on Dec. 1 as a group worldwide chairman and member of the executive committee that manages J&J's operations. It's the first major move by new chief executive officer Alex Gorsky, who has said that resuming quality production at McNeil is one of his highest priorities.
NEWS
April 27, 1995 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Science in the Summer program, sponsored by SmithKline Beecham Foundation in cooperation with local libraries, will be offered again this year throughout Bucks County. The courses are designed to make science fun for elementary school students with plenty of hands-on experiments. In Bucks County, the program will focus on physical science and electricity. Courses are offered for two age groups: children entering second and third grades, and those entering fourth through sixth grades.
NEWS
January 16, 1998 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Doctors who treat diabetics are divided over new court-enforced guidelines for diabetes care at three Delaware County nursing homes. Some say they're just right; others say they don't go far enough. But they agree on one thing: Care for diabetic residents in nursing homes - those with stellar reputations as well as problematic ones - needs to improve. "A diabetic in a nursing home has a much greater chance of being admitted to a hospital with a diabetic problem than someone not in a nursing home," said Mayer B. Davidson, an endocrinologist and president of the American Diabetes Association.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | By Galina Espinoza, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The school bus had broken down and was idled by the side of the road. As Sharon Sidorick, chaperone of her daughter Brianna's fourth-grade class trip to the Trenton Museum, waited for the bus to be fixed, she noticed Brianna take a drink of water, and another and another. Brianna hadn't been herself for a while. She seemed constantly tired, but wasn't that to be expected from a 10-year-old who spent her spare time practicing the trumpet, playing soccer and performing jazz and ballet routines in dance recitals?
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