CollectionsDiabetes Care
IN THE NEWS

Diabetes Care

LIVING
November 27, 2000 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Doctors know that overweight children are at greater risk for developing Type 2 diabetes - once called adult-onset diabetes. But new research raises the question of whether obesity could also be a factor in the rarer Type 1 diabetes, which used to be called juvenile diabetes. A Finnish study, published today in the journal Diabetes Care, indicated that overweight children older than 3 were more than twice as likely to develop Type 1. The possible obesity connection is of interest to researchers who have been grappling with a 33 percent surge in diabetes prevalence among American adults during the 1990s and the alarming recent appearance of Type 2 diabetes among children.
NEWS
November 17, 2008 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Diabetes has cost Robert Heard dearly. His left leg was amputated below the knee two years ago. Kidney failure - with its special diets, thrice-weekly dialysis, and ever-present threats of infection - is worse. "It breaks you down mentally," says Heard, 32, who has been waiting for a second kidney transplant since the first, donated by his uncle, failed four years ago. Heard was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 10, and said he managed it well for 15 years until, as an adult, he changed jobs and lost his health insurance.
FOOD
April 10, 2008 | By Carolyn Poirot, FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM
Chia seeds are best known for providing the fast-growing greenery on little clay "pets," but it's time to start thinking of them as a supergrain. Chia reportedly contains more omega-3 fatty acids than flaxseed, more fiber than bran, and more protein than soy. One 3.5-ounce serving (about one-fourth of a cup) of Salba - the variety of chia used in a new study published in the November issue of Diabetes Care - gives you as much calcium as three cups of milk, has as much omega-3 fatty acids as 28 ounces of salmon, and is higher in antioxidants than blueberries, says Vladimir Vuksan, the University of Toronto researcher who led the study.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A quarter of nursing home residents have diabetes, but doctors are only now recognizing that they may need different medical treatment than younger people with the disease. Elbert Huang, a University of Chicago primary care doctor who conducts diabetes research, bemoans the fact that clinical trials rarely include elderly diabetics even though nearly half of people with diabetes are over 65. Three recent, large trials of measures to keep tight control of blood sugar did include older people but yielded either detrimental results or no benefit.
NEWS
March 14, 2016 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For Ralph Dorsey, a referee and president of the Chester Biddy Basketball Association, the first sign of trouble came as he ran up and down the court. His feet hurt, but he told himself that real men don't complain about pain. When Dorsey finally made it to the doctor in 2008, he was first diagnosed with athlete's foot. But within a month, his foot turned dark and the verdict was far more serious: gangrene caused by blood clots in his veins from peripheral artery disease (PAD), a circulation disorder often associated with poorly controlled diabetes.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Inquirer
Arthur Chernoff has a dream, one that he feels will ease a lot of angst for diabetics and other chronically ill patients, and when he talks about it, he sounds almost as animated as the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. did describing his own dream. "Doctors and insurers should be doing more to lower the barriers to effective health care, instead of raising the barriers," said Chernoff, chairman of the Division of Endocrinology at Albert Einstein Medical Center. What Chernoff proposes is a sort of "diabetes passport," a way for patients to reach more easily the many doctors they need to see. Because the disease ravages so many body systems, diabetics may need, besides primary-care doctors, a phalanx of specialists such as endocrinologists, cardiologists, podiatrists, ophthalmologists or nephrologists, not to mention dietitians or other health professionals.
NEWS
June 19, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia police have made "significant improvements" in the way they process and care for people with diabetes held in lockups, the final report of a court-appointed monitor concludes. The report by a team of monitors for the American Diabetes Association was filed Friday in federal court, seven years after civil rights lawyers sued for a Philadelphia cabaret owner with diabetes who said he nearly died after he was arrested over a liquor-code violation, held for almost 24 hours, and denied access to insulin, blood-pressure medicine and medical care.
NEWS
August 8, 2002 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eating a meal when it is convenient. Indulging in sweets once considered off-limits. Waking up less often at night to go to the bathroom. Such are the little pleasures that make diabetes an ever more manageable disease. As the American Association of Diabetes Educators gathers in Philadelphia this week, the good news is that new treatments allow people with diabetes to live better. The bad news is that more Americans - more overweight than ever - are getting diabetes, and getting it earlier in life.
NEWS
September 11, 2016 | By Mike Natter, For The Inquirer
The screams of another child woke me from a restless sleep. When I opened my eyes, I found tubes and wires stuck all over my 9-year-old body. "Where am I?" I thought, watching a stretcher wheel by carrying a young boy, head wrapped in bloody gauze. The last thing I could remember was my father carrying me into the emergency room. It had been months since I slept through the night, because I had to keep getting up to use the bathroom due to the countless glasses of water I was chugging.
NEWS
September 18, 2016
Points to consider when shopping for an app to help manage diabetes care 1. Are you looking for a wellness app or a medical app? Wellness apps allow you to log in material, such as food consumption, exercise minutes, and blood glucose readings, while medical apps recommend how much insulin to take, when to take medications, etc. Medical apps are supposed to have undergone clinical and human factor trials and received FDA clearance. 2. What do you want from your app? Do you want to lose weight, increase exercise, receive support?
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|