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Diabetes Care

FOOD
April 10, 2008 | By Carolyn Poirot, FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM
Chia seeds are best known for providing the fast-growing greenery on little clay "pets," but it's time to start thinking of them as a supergrain. Chia reportedly contains more omega-3 fatty acids than flaxseed, more fiber than bran, and more protein than soy. One 3.5-ounce serving (about one-fourth of a cup) of Salba - the variety of chia used in a new study published in the November issue of Diabetes Care - gives you as much calcium as three cups of milk, has as much omega-3 fatty acids as 28 ounces of salmon, and is higher in antioxidants than blueberries, says Vladimir Vuksan, the University of Toronto researcher who led the study.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A quarter of nursing home residents have diabetes, but doctors are only now recognizing that they may need different medical treatment than younger people with the disease. Elbert Huang, a University of Chicago primary care doctor who conducts diabetes research, bemoans the fact that clinical trials rarely include elderly diabetics even though nearly half of people with diabetes are over 65. Three recent, large trials of measures to keep tight control of blood sugar did include older people but yielded either detrimental results or no benefit.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Inquirer
Arthur Chernoff has a dream, one that he feels will ease a lot of angst for diabetics and other chronically ill patients, and when he talks about it, he sounds almost as animated as the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. did describing his own dream. "Doctors and insurers should be doing more to lower the barriers to effective health care, instead of raising the barriers," said Chernoff, chairman of the Division of Endocrinology at Albert Einstein Medical Center. What Chernoff proposes is a sort of "diabetes passport," a way for patients to reach more easily the many doctors they need to see. Because the disease ravages so many body systems, diabetics may need, besides primary-care doctors, a phalanx of specialists such as endocrinologists, cardiologists, podiatrists, ophthalmologists or nephrologists, not to mention dietitians or other health professionals.
NEWS
June 19, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia police have made "significant improvements" in the way they process and care for people with diabetes held in lockups, the final report of a court-appointed monitor concludes. The report by a team of monitors for the American Diabetes Association was filed Friday in federal court, seven years after civil rights lawyers sued for a Philadelphia cabaret owner with diabetes who said he nearly died after he was arrested over a liquor-code violation, held for almost 24 hours, and denied access to insulin, blood-pressure medicine and medical care.
NEWS
August 8, 2002 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eating a meal when it is convenient. Indulging in sweets once considered off-limits. Waking up less often at night to go to the bathroom. Such are the little pleasures that make diabetes an ever more manageable disease. As the American Association of Diabetes Educators gathers in Philadelphia this week, the good news is that new treatments allow people with diabetes to live better. The bad news is that more Americans - more overweight than ever - are getting diabetes, and getting it earlier in life.
NEWS
November 1, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Three years ago, Allison Turner noticed her vision was getting a little blurry. "I knew I had to see a doctor," she said. "But I was scared and didn't deal with it. " The result was that when Turner, a professor of public policy and administration at West Chester University, awoke one morning, she couldn't see out of her left eye. A trip to a retina specialist confirmed she had suffered a detached retina caused by diabetic retinopathy....
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Want to know your chances of dying in the next 10 years? Here are bad signs: getting winded walking several blocks, smoking, having trouble pushing a chair across the room. That's according to a "mortality index" developed by San Francisco researchers for people older than 50. The test scores may satisfy people's morbid curiosity, but the researchers say their 12-item index is mostly for use by doctors. It can help them decide whether costly health screenings or medical procedures are worth the risk for patients unlikely to live 10 more years.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2013
National Liberty Museum, Philadelphia, elected the following to its executive board of directors for a three-year term: Steven K. Leff, a licensed CPA with Mayer Hoffman & McCann P.C. and a senior managing director of the Philadelphia office of CBIZ MHM L.L.C.; Nicole L. LeVine, manager of Peco's Operations Control Center; Beth Galvin, a principal with Ernst & Young L.L.P. and leader of the firm's international tax transfer pricing practice in Philadelphia; Susan M. Stevens, US Airways' director of inflight services; and Alex Friedman , founder of Checker Cab Philadelphia and All City Taxi in Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 6, 2012
When I was a medical student in San Francisco in the 1980s, I did most rotations at county and VA hospitals. Most patients were poor, and many were from racial and ethnic minority groups. One day, two teenage Asian American boys were wheeled into the trauma emergency room, already dead. They had been slashed in the neck, victims of gang violence. These boys were not much younger than I was, and I realized all too clearly that it could have been me on that stretcher. Most of my patients now are African Americans from Chicago's South Side.
NEWS
April 27, 1995 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Science in the Summer program, sponsored by SmithKline Beecham Foundation in cooperation with local libraries, will be offered again this year throughout Bucks County. The courses are designed to make science fun for elementary school students with plenty of hands-on experiments. In Bucks County, the program will focus on physical science and electricity. Courses are offered for two age groups: children entering second and third grades, and those entering fourth through sixth grades.
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