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Diabetes Care

NEWS
April 4, 2006
RONNIE Polaneczky's March 30 column ("Taken to the Cleaners") was a distortion of a case in which years of illegal dumping of hazardous materials by a small business was uncovered by a SEPTA construction project. Debonair Dry Cleaners, 60th and Market, was cited by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection for illegally dumping hazardous residue from the cleaning process in the ground beneath and around its property. As a result of the volume of this dumping, over years, the foundation of the building was undermined.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
IN HEALTH Dr. James Bonner of Broomall, medical director of the Physical Rehabilitation Center of the Delaware Valley in Folsom, has been appointed president of the Philadelphia Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Bonner has been a member of the 25-year-old organization since 1981 and also has served as program chairman, secretary, treasurer and vice president of the chapter. As president and organizer, Bonner presides over meetings, obtains guest lecturers from around the country, develops programs and various chapter functions, and serves as facilitator for professional information on the physical-medicine and rehabilitation field.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Johnson & Johnson has named a Bayer Group executive to a new post responsible for J&J's troubled McNeil consumer-health facility in Fort Washington. Sandra E. Peterson, chief executive of Bayer CropScience A.G. in Europe, will join J&J on Dec. 1 as a group worldwide chairman and member of the executive committee that manages J&J's operations. It's the first major move by new chief executive officer Alex Gorsky, who has said that resuming quality production at McNeil is one of his highest priorities.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2013
National Liberty Museum, Philadelphia, elected the following to its executive board of directors for a three-year term: Steven K. Leff, a licensed CPA with Mayer Hoffman & McCann P.C. and a senior managing director of the Philadelphia office of CBIZ MHM L.L.C.; Nicole L. LeVine, manager of Peco's Operations Control Center; Beth Galvin, a principal with Ernst & Young L.L.P. and leader of the firm's international tax transfer pricing practice in Philadelphia; Susan M. Stevens, US Airways' director of inflight services; and Alex Friedman , founder of Checker Cab Philadelphia and All City Taxi in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2013 | By Matthew Perrone, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration is cracking down on more than a dozen companies that market illegal diabetes treatments, ranging from bogus dietary supplements to prescription drugs sold online without a prescription. The products aim to cash in on the country's diabetes epidemic, which affects nearly 26 million Americans. Regulators worry that consumers who buy such unapproved products could put off getting legitimate medical care. The FDA sent warning letters to 15 companies, here and abroad, ordering them to stop selling diabetes treatments that violate U.S. drug laws.
NEWS
February 18, 2003 | By Sharon M. Buttress
Camden Councilman Ali Sloan El needs to take another look at health care in the city. He accuses State Sen. Wayne R. Bryant (D., Camden) of benefiting his brother, Mark, with the proposed allocation of Camden recovery money from Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center to CAMcare Health Corp. to expand comprehensive primary health-care services. Mark Bryant is president of CAMcare. Look around, Mr. Sloan El. In the midst of some of New Jersey's wealthiest communities, Camden's health statistics rival those in the Third World.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2012 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The number of diabetics in America is growing. The number of unemployed pharmaceutical workers seems to be doing the same. That combination is bad, unless you are Novo Nordisk. A relatively small Danish-based drug company with a U.S. home in Princeton, Novo Nordisk is in a sweet spot in the pharmaceutical landscape because the core of its business is diabetes. With 40 straight quarters of double-digit growth, the company said Friday it plans a 15 percent increase to its U.S. workforce, meaning about 615 more jobs, through the end of this year.
NEWS
September 6, 2012
When I was a medical student in San Francisco in the 1980s, I did most rotations at county and VA hospitals. Most patients were poor, and many were from racial and ethnic minority groups. One day, two teenage Asian American boys were wheeled into the trauma emergency room, already dead. They had been slashed in the neck, victims of gang violence. These boys were not much younger than I was, and I realized all too clearly that it could have been me on that stretcher. Most of my patients now are African Americans from Chicago's South Side.
NEWS
June 11, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Essence magazine and Inquirer wire services
BREAST IMPLANTS Forget silicone. Peanut-oil-filled implants could mean safer breast enlargements for thousands of women who have the surgery each year, says Washington University radiologist Judy Destouet. Because the oil is transparent, such implants do not interfere with X-ray mammography for breast cancer the way silicone breast implants can, Destouet says. The new implants could be commerically available in about two years. SWIMMING-POOL COVERS Swimming-pool owners, beware: Solar-pool covers pose a special drowning risk to young children, who may incorrectly believe they are solid enough to support their weight, a study in the journal Pediatrics reports.
NEWS
June 22, 2001 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Until recently, patients with diabetes could get only insulin and one type of drug from their doctors. Today, a treatment revolution is under way, giving hope for longer, healthier lives to the 16 million Americans with the burgeoning disease. "The options that we have available to treat someone with diabetes are light-years more than 10 years ago," said Frank Vinicor, director of the diabetes division for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who will attend the American Diabetes Association meeting opening today in Philadelphia.
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