FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 25, 2005
I'M NOT a journalist nor do I understand the process of editing the Daily News, but I know you have better sense than to write in big bold letters "A schizophrenic is missing" (City/Region, May 19). Our society is polluted because of the misunderstanding and stereotypical views of how someone is categorized with a mental illness. The schizophrenic that your article so insensitively wrote about had a full description of the person missing. You had her age, weight, height and what she was last seen wearing, but instead led off with the schizophrenic piece.
NEWS
February 18, 1987 | By Carolyn Acker, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
A psychiatrist who helped establish the professional criteria for diagnosing mental disorders testified yesterday that surrogate mother Mary Beth Whitehead is not suffering from a personality disorder, as other mental- health experts have asserted. Appearing on behalf of Whitehead at the Baby M trial, Dr. Donald F. Klein testified that Wynnewood psychiatrist Marshall D. Schechter improperly diagnosed Whitehead as having a "mixed personality disorder. " In his diagnosis, prepared for the baby's court-appointed guardian, Schechter said he used the criteria established in the third edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, referred to as DSM- III. Klein, a practicing psychiatrist in New York City and a medical professor at Columbia University, testified yesterday that he had been on the 19-member task force that helped write the manual.
NEWS
April 10, 1997 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
For young Joshua Knobel, life consisted of one crisis after another as he lay in a hospital bed, vomiting hour after hour, sometimes for days. Life was hell for his parents, as well, as they watched their child suffer, and waited for his death from Fazio-Laude Disease, one of the world's rarest neurological illnesses. But Joshua Knobel, now 14, of Langhorne, Bucks County, never had fatal Fazio-Laude. Yesterday, a Philadelphia jury awarded $9.9 million to Joshua and his parents in a medical malpractice suit against a former Children's Hospital of Philadelphia neurologist who diagnosed the disease.
NEWS
October 18, 2012
Through Wednesday, Philly.com/health and The Inquirer will mark breast cancer awareness month by publishing a profile a day of transformative moments reported by patients. The series will culminate in a special Philly.com/Inquirer section on Thursday, and can be viewed at www.philly.com/breastcancer . When Valerie Miller turned 25, her mother began nudging her to get a mammogram. Age 25 is extremely young to begin this check for breast cancer, but Valerie's mother had breast cancer, and Valerie's aunt had breast cancer, and both grandmothers had breast cancer.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1996 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Given his credentials, one might presume that Jeffrey Lerner would have had an easier time finding the best medical treatment for his mother. But he bounced along like anyone else trying to gather sound answers for a grim cancer diagnosis. As a senior executive for a nonprofit health-services research group in Plymouth Meeting, Lerner could read whatever was available about malignant melanoma. Even so, his efforts did not equip him for his mother's three-year struggle with the disease.
NEWS
February 22, 2009 | By Cynthia Henry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Betsy Smetona of Haddon Heights quit her job last summer to stay home with her children. Her 23-year-old twins, Megan and Michael, have graduated from the Bancroft School in Haddonfield and can't be left alone. Both have autism, although in different degrees. "It's a big shock to the system when they graduate," Smetona said. "Their schooling was everything to them. It met their social and extracurricular needs. It's hard to find something in the community for Michael and Megan to do. " For the Smetonas and other New Jersey families in a similar situation, help could be on the way. Gov. Corzine signed laws in 2007 and 2008 that are now taking effect to enable early diagnosis of autism, develop screening guidelines for physicians, create a statewide patient registry, and educate emergency responders to recognize developmental disabilities.
NEWS
February 10, 1999 | By Rachel Scheier, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The two men were brothers, they were friends, but they also were physician and patient. And one diagnosis made on a winter day five years ago changed everything. In December 1993, Joseph Labricciosa, a family practice physician in Springfield, Delaware County, examined his brother Robert and diagnosed a case of hemorrhoids. But he was actually suffering from rectal cancer. That first diagnosis recently culminated in a Delaware County courtroom, where a jury ordered Joseph Labricciosa to pay $8.2 million to his late brother's widow - one of the largest verdicts in recent county history, in a case that has divided a family.
NEWS
July 12, 2015 | By Linwood R. Haith Jr., For The Inquirer
A 43-year-old woman came to a hospital complaining of abdominal pain. She was in poor health generally, with serious kidney disease, insulin-dependent diabetes, vascular disease, and obesity. She also had stomach ulcers, but the pain that brought her to the hospital was like nothing she'd ever experienced. She had been taking antibiotics for a urinary tract infection and developed blisters, which suggested an allergic reaction. Hospital staff quickly found her to be in severe septic shock.
NEWS
November 19, 1998 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Attorney's Office yesterday announced that Presbyterian Medical Center in West Philadelphia had agreed to pay $535,448 to settle civil allegations by the government that it improperly obtained Medicare payments by using an inaccurate diagnosis reimbursement code for pneumonia patients from October 1992 to March 1997. The agreement, under which Presbyterian officials did not admit liability under the False Claims Act, was one of three such agreements filed by prosecutors in Philadelphia and in Chicago.
NEWS
April 15, 1992 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: I would appreciate information on fibromyalgia and polymyalgia. I've had many tests and my diagnosis has been narrowed to these conditions. Anti- inflammatories such as Advil have eased the pain, but I need some direction. A: Fibromyalgia is a common rheumatic disorder, of unknown cause, marked by muscle pain, tenderness and stiffness. The hallmark of this disease is the presence of "trigger points," localized areas of muscle or tendon that are exquisitely tender when pressed.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 11, 2016
Q. How do I know if I have a hernia? A. A hernia happens when muscle or tissue holding an organ in place becomes weakened, causing part of the organ to bulge out of its protective tissue. The National Center for Health Statistics estimates about 5 million Americans have hernias. Hernias around the stomach area are the most common, including hiatal (upper stomach), inguinal (inner groin), femoral (below the groin crease), incisional (bulging through a surgical scar), and umbilical (belly button)
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Craig MacGregor feels betrayed - by his doctors, by the health-care system and, devastatingly, by his own fingers. For much of the last 40 years, he played bass for Foghat, the classic rock band best known for the hit "Slow Ride. " Now, his fingertips have grown bulbous - "clubbed," doctors call it, a side effect of chemotherapy to treat his advanced lung cancer. He can barely play music at all anymore. "Overnight, it's gone," he says. "That's a hard thing to accept. " Even harder: Though he didn't learn of his cancer until last year, it actually was first detected four years ago during a CAT scan to check for broken ribs after a fall.
NEWS
April 10, 2016
Q. I have been diagnosed with cancer. What is going to happen now? A. According to the American Cancer Society, in 2015 there were an estimated 1.6 million new cancer cases diagnosed and 590,430 cancer deaths in the United States. After a cancer diagnosis, you may be unsure about what comes next. For many, the toughest parts are learning to cope with the diagnosis and understanding the types of cancer and the treatment process. A cancer diagnosis will also bring many changes for you and your loved ones.
NEWS
March 10, 2016 | By Jenice Armstrong
The world lost one of its highest-profile Alzheimer's advocates on Sunday when Nancy Reagan died. Whatever you think of the first lady or her late husband, you have to give her props for supporting embryonic stem-cell research following his 1994 Alzheimer's diagnosis. That's the thing with many of us. Often, we are one diagnosis away from becoming similarly energized. Take former restaurateur B. Smith. Back in the 1970s, she was a pioneering fashion model who was the first African-American ever featured on the cover of Mademoiselle.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Gov. Wolf said his prostate cancer was detected after a "regular checkup revealed abnormalities. " He declined to clarify whether that means he has been having routine PSA blood tests to check for prostate cancer. In recent years, PSA screening rates have been falling as expert groups have stressed the limits and risks of the practice. The prostate-specific antigen test checks for a blood protein that can surge with benign as well as malignant prostate gland changes. Initially approved only to monitor cancer patients for recurrence, the PSA test cannot distinguish aggressive malignancies from those that would never be life-threatening if left untreated.
NEWS
July 12, 2015 | By Linwood R. Haith Jr., For The Inquirer
A 43-year-old woman came to a hospital complaining of abdominal pain. She was in poor health generally, with serious kidney disease, insulin-dependent diabetes, vascular disease, and obesity. She also had stomach ulcers, but the pain that brought her to the hospital was like nothing she'd ever experienced. She had been taking antibiotics for a urinary tract infection and developed blisters, which suggested an allergic reaction. Hospital staff quickly found her to be in severe septic shock.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alex Niles, 32, formerly of Yardley, a businessman who created clothing designed to provide comfort for cancer patients during treatment, died Wednesday, April 8, of gastric cancer at his mother's home in the Forest Hills section of New York City. Mr. Niles founded CureWear, a nonprofit that made clothing with a flap so an intravenous line could be hooked up to a medical port without requiring the wearer to undress. His own health crisis inspired Mr. Niles to make treatment "a little more comfortable for the chronically ill," his family said in a statement.
NEWS
August 23, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six months. That's how much time Bob Rosen figured he had left. The Yardley accountant was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, typically a rapidly spreading form of the disease. The doctors advised surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Rosen, 71, began getting his affairs in order. He talked with his son Eric, who would have the responsibility of disbursing his father's $160,000 in charitable donations after Rosen passed away. His father's generous gesture would be executed under heartbreaking circumstances; Eric Rosen dreaded the day. He told his father he had a better thought: Why wait?
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania has joined a small but growing number of states requiring that a Down syndrome diagnosis be accompanied by useful, accurate information about the genetic disorder. The Down Syndrome Prenatal and Postnatal Education Act, effective Oct. 1, mandates that medical practitioners give expectant or new parents "informational publications," to be provided online by the state health department. The Down syndrome advocates behind such state laws - five in the last two years, including in Delaware and Maryland - promote them as a way to give unbiased information to pregnant women at a momentous, stressful juncture.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Katie Hayek had rushed from Philadelphia to New York, and made it to the set just in time to prepare for the day's shooting of The Following. It was February 2013 and Hayek, an aspiring actress, had scored a small role in the television series about an uber-violent, but highly, literate cult. "Too many tanning beds?" the hair and makeup artist asked, noticing the pocked trail of blisters across Hayek's scorched chest. Hayek laughed. "Let me tell you about that tanning bed. " Hayek (pronounced HAY-eck)
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