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Dialysis

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NEWS
January 2, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Increasing numbers of people with kidney failure, many of them gravely ill, choose to end their lives by stopping dialysis treatment, and these little- publicized deaths are likely to become even more common, a study concludes. Researchers surveyed a large dialysis program and found that halting the therapy accounted for 22 percent of the deaths among its patients. While "agony and difficulty" wrack all people involved in terminating treatment, the study said, those choosing discontinuation "made deliberate decisions, having spent almost three years on dialysis before treatment was stopped.
NEWS
October 1, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
After suffering from chronic kidney disease for a year and experiencing fatigue in recent months, Bishop Joseph Galante of the Catholic Diocese of Camden will begin dialysis treatments six times weekly beginning this month. In an online letter to members of the diocese, Galante said he had a series of medical procedures to prepare him for dialysis. The date of his first treatment has not been set, diocese spokesman Peter Feuerherd said. Though the sessions will last up to three hours each, Galante expects to continue his regular duties.
NEWS
April 12, 1988 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Officials of Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital in Camden have released their account of the frightening drama that unfolded in the hospital's Regional Artificial Kidney and Transplant Center last week when one patient died and two others suffered cardiac arrests as a result of technicians' errors. The accident occurred when dialysis unit staffers inadvertently switched two drugs used in dialysis - mannitol, which raises blood pressure, and lidocaine, an anesthetic. On April 6, according to the hospital's final report of its investigation, a dialysis technician inadvertently gave a lethal dose of lidocaine, to Angelo Carillo, 68, of Pennsauken.
NEWS
May 20, 1988 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
The death of a kidney dialysis patient during a routine visit to a Camden hospital last month was the result of the sloppy labeling of medicines, the failure to follow established procedures and a reliance on inadequately trained technicians, according to a New Jersey Health Department report released yesterday. Officials at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center attacked virtually all of the state's findings in a 17-page rebuttal issued late yesterday afternoon. They vigorously defended the use of technicians, rather than nurses, to oversee dialysis patients, saying the state has never prohibited the practice.
NEWS
March 31, 2003 | By Kevin Dale INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Willem J. Kolff, 92, like many retirees, likes to tinker in the craft room of the Dunwoody Village retirement home. On several cluttered tables, past the miniature trains, beyond the cubbyholes of brightly colored yarn, ceramic unicorns and pots of glazes, Kolff works on his project. He's building an artificial lung. Undaunted by age, Kolff is continuing a lifetime of work with artificial organs that began with his invention of the kidney-dialysis machine during World War II. For his pioneering work, Kolff last month received the $500,000 Russ Prize from the National Academy of Engineering.
NEWS
April 12, 1988 | By Jeff Brown, Inquirer Staff Writer
The heart attack caused by an accidental medication mix-up at a Camden kidney-dialysis unit last week distracted workers so much that they failed to catch the error and gave two other patients the wrong drug, hospital officials said yesterday. In their first detailed public account of the matter, officials of Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center said yesterday that they had completed their investigation of the April 6 incident, in which one man died and two others went into cardiac arrest but were revived.
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Usually, the blood test is a formality, passed over as quickly as a crack in the sidewalk on the way to the wedding chapel. But, for 21-year-old Gail Levick, that tiny pin prick in 1971 burst illusions of endless health, revealing the illness that would devastate her strength, steal her independence and nearly kill her several times. Diagnosed with severe kidney disease just three weeks before her marriage to Harvey Goldglantz, she spent 13 years on medicine or dialysis while her body rejected two successive transplants.
NEWS
November 11, 2012
A Berks County man was charged Friday with stealing $500,000 intended for his wife's dialysis treatments, federal prosecutors said. Darwin D. Dieter, 53, of Kempton, allegedly laundered proceeds from insurance checks between December 2010 and July 2011. He was arrested Friday by FBI agents. If convicted, he faces a maximum prison term of 120 years and a $2.75 million fine. - Robert Moran  
NEWS
October 2, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
After suffering from chronic kidney disease for a year and experiencing fatigue in recent months, Bishop Joseph Galante of the Catholic Diocese of Camden will begin dialysis treatments six times weekly beginning this month. In an online letter to members of the diocese, Galante said he had a series of medical procedures to prepare him for dialysis. The date of his first treatment has not been set, diocese spokesman Peter Feuerherd said. Although the sessions will last up to three hours each, Galante expects to continue his regular duties.
NEWS
December 9, 1989 | By Gregory Spears, Inquirer Washington Bureau
To curb Medicare costs, Congress last month slashed nearly in half Medicare payments to a company that provides in-home dialysis for more than 1,850 kidney patients in 30 cities. Government health experts contend that the firm simply became too greedy and overcharged for its services. After the cut takes effect Feb. 1, the government estimates there will be savings of $70 million this fiscal year and $600 million over five years. But the hardship this will impose on patients who find it hard to walk, much less leave their homes, highlights the hard choices the government makes when it tries to control Medicare costs.
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NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most mornings, Gregory Frison reclines in a chair in the extra bedroom in his Elkins Park home, conversing with his wife, Ann, or a member of his church. And on Thursday nights, he shouts from the same chair during the 76ers games he watches with friends. He never seems to mind the quietly humming dialysis machine next to him, filtering his blood the whole time. "It is pure freedom," said Frison, who has been dialyzing at home six days a week since March 2012. Diagnosed with end-stage renal disease seven years ago, Frison started care at a dialysis center before he learned about home dialysis from a nurse.
NEWS
August 13, 2013
GOP's 'threat' to networks So the Republican National Committee is threatening to prevent two networks from airing the 2016 GOP presidential debates if they go ahead with plans to air specials about Hillary Clinton ("Republicans want NBC, CNN to pull Clinton programs," Aug. 9). What a break for NBC and CNN: a chance to get out of televising the GOP's quadrennial clown show. I suggest that NBC and CNN call RNC Chairman Reince Priebus' bluff and go ahead with the Hillary specials.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Dr. Janani Rangaswami, For The Inquirer
Tanya Christie was one of the first patients I cared for after I finished training as a kidney specialist. Faced with end-stage kidney disease and the prospect of going on dialysis, Tanya, 50, of Philadelphia, was one of the few patients who educated herself and chose a lesser-known treatment - peritoneal dialysis (PD) - which can be done at home. PD is cheaper, more convenient, and gets better results than the typical dialysis clinic, yet few American patients choose it or even know about it. To me, Tanya's successful care with PD exemplifies its advantages and suggests a path that more patients should consider.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The e-mail that Nancy Gleason received last September was lengthy: a last-ditch plea from a distant relative, writing to ask if she knew anyone who might be willing to donate a kidney to a stranger. Gleason clicked the "forward" button and typed in her husband's e-mail address. Her e-mail was just one line long: "We're both O-positive. I'm in if you are. " Eight months later, Chief Joe Gleason of the West Goshen Police Department was heading into surgery at the Mayo Clinic, about to give a major organ to a woman he had met two days before.
NEWS
November 11, 2012
A Berks County man was charged Friday with stealing $500,000 intended for his wife's dialysis treatments, federal prosecutors said. Darwin D. Dieter, 53, of Kempton, allegedly laundered proceeds from insurance checks between December 2010 and July 2011. He was arrested Friday by FBI agents. If convicted, he faces a maximum prison term of 120 years and a $2.75 million fine. - Robert Moran  
NEWS
September 20, 2012 | By Harold Brubaker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lourdes Health System in South Jersey announced two deals this week that are part of a strategy to expand the range of services it offers. Lourdes bought a 51 percent stake in Centennial Surgery Center in Voorhees from 30 physician owners and sold an 81 percent stake in its three kidney dialysis centers to industry giant DaVita Inc. Financial terms of the deals were not disclosed. "For us, it just gave us the ability to invest in other services," Kimberly D. Barnes, vice president for planning and development at Lourdes said of the DaVita deal, which was disclosed Wednesday.
SPORTS
July 12, 2012 | BY TED SILARY and Daily News Staff Writer
CARLTON CORPREW tried to maintain his composure and not come off like a bad person. But a few people, and one man in particular, kept making negative comments and, finally, Corprew felt compelled to make a pointed comment. "I just kept hearing horror stories. That's all this one guy, especially, was giving me," Corprew said. "I reached the point where I had to tell him, ‘I don't mean any harm by this, but if it's not something positive, I don't want to hear it.'?" That exchange took place late in 2010, a few days after Corprew, an important basketball player for University City High in the 1981-82 season, received a kidney transplant and was undergoing a short stint of follow-up dialysis.
NEWS
June 30, 2012
A Bucks County man has been indicted in a scheme that bilked Medicare of more than $5.4 million. William V. Hlushmanuk, 35, of Churchville, was charged in a 23-count health-care-fraud indictment that was unsealed Friday by the U.S. Attorney's Office. Hlushmanuk allegedly started the Starcare Ambulance Co. in 2006 to transport kidney dialysis patients. Because Hlushmanuk had a criminal record that included convictions for burglary, assault, and firearms violations, he was ineligible to operate the company under his own name, so he used a straw owner identified in documents only as B.R. Starcare employees allegedly instructed patients who could walk to climb onto stretchers for their three-times-a-week trips to dialysis clinics.
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