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NEWS
April 14, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
AMERICANS HAVE been gambling ever since we made a bet on independence and sailed away from Mother England. Since then, we've made wagering a mega-industry. Casino slots, horse racing, state lotteries, March Madness pools. Name a scheme, we'll slap money on it. So it was only a matter of time before we'd place bets on our own behavior. Such as whether we'd stick to a diet. Enter HealthyWage, which designs and organizes weight-loss challenges in which you can win money for dropping pounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013
NEUROLOGIST David Perlmutter has hit the top of the New York Times best-seller list for his provocative nutrition book, Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar - Your Brain's Silent Killers . He argues that carbohydrates (even the whole-grain carbs that we think of as the good ones) are linked to a range of modern-day maladies, including Alzheimer's, depression, headaches, epilepsy and ADHD. Since we already know the havoc that carbs can wreak on our waistlines, could he be on to something?
NEWS
April 20, 2011
CHICAGO - The Federal Trade Commission said yesterday that it has asked federal courts to stop a wave of fake news sites that entice consumers to buy the unproven acai-berry diet. The sites violate federal law by using the logos of major news outlets to mislead consumers into thinking they're reading real news reports, according to the court filings. In reality, the sites are advertisements. Last year, the FTC filed a lawsuit against a Phoenix-based company for using fake celebrity endorsements for acai-berry products.
NEWS
September 1, 2011 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We are what we eat, or so the saying goes. Turns out that also applies to the bugs in our intestines. In a study of 98 people and their poop, University of Pennsylvania scientists reported Thursday that a person's long-term diet is connected to what kind of bacteria live inside the gut. The intestinal tracts of folks on a high-fat, high-protein long-term diet tended to be dominated by one kind of bacteria, whereas those who favored carbohydrates...
NEWS
September 2, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here's some new dietary research, if you have the stomach for it: Your choice of foods may affect the kinds of bugs that live in your intestines. In a study of 98 people and their poop, University of Pennsylvania scientists reported Thursday that a person's long-term diet is connected to what kinds of bacteria live inside the gut. The intestinal tracts of folks who typically ate a high-fat, high-protein diet tended to be dominated by one kind...
SPORTS
January 20, 2014 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
When I tell non-runners that I'm training for a marathon, one of the first things they say - aside from that I'm crazy - is that it must be nice to eat whatever I want. If only that were the case. "Runners can eat whatever they want, but they might perform better if they eat the right food at the time times," said dietitian Nancy Clark. "You can't out-train a bad diet. " Clark, who is based in Boston, will be giving a free seminar, "Nutrition for Runners," at the Center City location of the Philadelphia Runner at 7 p.m. Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
Blimey - a British diet craze seems to be successfully invading American shores. The FastDiet , out less than a week in the United States, is already the No. 1 book at Amazon.com. That's on the heels of being the top seller for weeks in Britain, despite being published just in January. It's based on the findings by physician-journalist Michael Mosley that people can benefit from intermittent deprivation, and that occasional semi-starvation is a lot more tolerable than weeks or months of unrelenting self-denial.
FOOD
September 20, 2012 | By Monica Eng, Chicago Tribune
Does a healthy diet cost more than a junk-food diet in America? That depends on whom you ask, how you measure food and, most important, if you know how to cook. This year the U.S. Department of Agriculture released a new analysis indicating that fruits, vegetables, grains and low-fat milk tend to be less expensive by weight and serving size than fatty, sugary foods and meat, fish, and poultry. The takeaway message, according to its authors: Healthful foods actually cost less than foods we are supposed to restrict.
NEWS
July 15, 1998 | by Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
It was like crossing the desert on a horse with no name. OK, OK. The horse had a name. It was D.C. Maxwell's "6 Week Fat to Muscle Program" and I started it six weeks ago with the publicly stated goal of losing 20 pounds. The desert - a vast, harsh, bitter place - is a metaphor for the diet. I got thisclose. At the end of the six weeks, I lost 18 pounds, dropping from 222 to 204. Maxwell, a/k/a Coach Hardbody, predicted at the outset of the ordeal that I would not lose 20. I had set my goal too high, she said.
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BUSINESS
May 8, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Tracking your calories. Watching your salt intake. Eating less sugar and more vegetables. Monitoring macronutrients such as protein, fats, and fiber. All are among things health-savvy Americans try to do nowadays, sometimes the old-fashioned way - say, with notebooks and calorie charts - and sometimes online or with mobile apps. But as anyone who tries food tracking can tell you, it's tough to keep up. Philadelphia's Anthony Ortiz says he's invented a better way: SmartPlate, a high-tech, patent-pending tool he unveiled this week at the Collision , a competitive technology   expo in Las Vegas, and on Kickstarter, the crowdfunding website.
NEWS
January 18, 2015
ISSUE | FREE SPEECH Echoes of Penn Penn professor Anne Norton purports to protect speech but not bigotry, yet confuses both and protects neither ("Protect free speech, but don't defend bigotry," Jan. 14). Norton's model appears to be her employer, the University of Pennsylvania, which The Inquirer once branded as the nation's most politically correct university. That stemmed from a student's use of the term "water buffalo," for which Penn acted to expel him for violating its speech code.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
CAVEMEN had all the time in the world. Those single-minded Homo sapiens didn't have to worry about multitasking or time clocks. Which is why weary home cooks following a gluten-free diet - or simply trying to feed their families fresh, healthful food - may say "paleo-schmaleo" when trying to follow in our ancestors' knuckle-dragging steps. The much-hyped paleo diet - or lifestyle, if you will - tosses out the agricultural products incorporated into the human diet over the past, say, 10,000 years in favor of a whole-foods approach to eating meat, plants and seafood that dates back to cave-dwelling days.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
A few things I adore: butter pecan ice cream, fresh-baked sourdough bread, and peaches. A few things I no longer eat: butter pecan ice cream, fresh-baked sourdough bread, and peaches. (OK, I did indulge in a scoop of homemade butter pecan in Cape May over the summer, which I downed in record time. But it was the first time I had eaten ice cream in a year.) I'm not talking about giving up gluten or going on a weird crash diet. Not even about the currently trendy paleo lifestyle.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Joan Capuzzi, V.M.D., For The Inquirer
Ish has always been content to lounge in the yard with his owner, occasionally showing his "silly side" by zipping around the house before slumping down in front of the screen door to gaze outside. "He just fits me," said Stephanie Stepansky, of Harrisburg, who purchased the orange-flecked bearded dragon from a pet store six years ago, at age three months. But in January, Ish went from leaping lizard to lump. His normal fervor for daily playtime became uninterrupted rest in the log hollow within of his 75-gallon tank.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2014
WHILE MANY women demonstrated their liberation in the 1970s by burning their bras, in my opinion they should have thrown their suck-the-life-out-of-you girdles into the flames, too. Far more dangerous to a woman's health and happiness than a bra, girdles and their 19th-century cousin, the corset, have made a stunning comeback. A girdle by any other name, the 21st-century garment comes with such sweet euphemisms: beauty girdle, compression garment, body shaper, shape wear and waist cinchers.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
These days, all you need to lose weight is diet, exercise, and a smartphone. You know what I'm talking about? Haven't you noticed the trend? I haven't, either. Daughter Francesca keeps me abreast of such things, so that I can sound remotely relevant at cocktail parties, which I never attend and doubt even exist anymore. We begin when I was on my last diet, and Francesca told me that the best way to lose weight was to use an app that was free for your phone, called Lose It!
NEWS
May 30, 2014
PLANT-based foods: Powerful enough to knock you on your ass? Indeed. Especially as processed by some Philly Roller Girls who fuel themselves with "kinder, gentler" foods as they elbow their way to the top of their tough game. Our Delaware Valley league has around 50 women on four teams, including the Liberty Belles all-stars, who take on Pittsburgh's Steel City Roller Derby on Saturday at the University of Pennsylvania's Class of 1923 Arena. More than a dozen PRG members are vegetarian and/or vegan-leaning eaters, estimated league spokeswoman Erica Vanstone.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2014
STARS struggle with their weight just like, well, just like normal folk. The difference is, celebrities take a real beating in the press for their highly publicized ups and downs. When I think about Kirstie Alley, Christina Aguilera, Janet Jackson, Jessica Simpson, Jennifer Hudson, Valerie Bertinelli, and perhaps the most famous of all, Oprah, I think of the many lessons these courageous women have taught me about the highs and lows of weight loss. I suppose that when stress piles up, celebrities - just like the rest of us - use food for comfort.
FOOD
January 31, 2014 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Since the Eagles once again aren't playing in the Super Bowl, we have another chance to celebrate the cuisines of other teams - without feeling the least bit disloyal. The heritage, population, and climes of both coastal Seattle and mile-high Denver are a great starting point for some fresh and healthful dishes. And it seems too close after making the New Year's resolution for a healthy diet to revert to the worst of the junk-food habits of game day. So, why not draw inspiration from the cities of the two franchises who will be facing off for Super Bowl XLVIII on Sunday?
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