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NEWS
April 14, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
AMERICANS HAVE been gambling ever since we made a bet on independence and sailed away from Mother England. Since then, we've made wagering a mega-industry. Casino slots, horse racing, state lotteries, March Madness pools. Name a scheme, we'll slap money on it. So it was only a matter of time before we'd place bets on our own behavior. Such as whether we'd stick to a diet. Enter HealthyWage, which designs and organizes weight-loss challenges in which you can win money for dropping pounds.
NEWS
September 1, 2011 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We are what we eat, or so the saying goes. Turns out that also applies to the bugs in our intestines. In a study of 98 people and their poop, University of Pennsylvania scientists reported Thursday that a person's long-term diet is connected to what kind of bacteria live inside the gut. The intestinal tracts of folks on a high-fat, high-protein long-term diet tended to be dominated by one kind of bacteria, whereas those who favored carbohydrates...
NEWS
April 20, 2011
CHICAGO - The Federal Trade Commission said yesterday that it has asked federal courts to stop a wave of fake news sites that entice consumers to buy the unproven acai-berry diet. The sites violate federal law by using the logos of major news outlets to mislead consumers into thinking they're reading real news reports, according to the court filings. In reality, the sites are advertisements. Last year, the FTC filed a lawsuit against a Phoenix-based company for using fake celebrity endorsements for acai-berry products.
NEWS
September 2, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here's some new dietary research, if you have the stomach for it: Your choice of foods may affect the kinds of bugs that live in your intestines. In a study of 98 people and their poop, University of Pennsylvania scientists reported Thursday that a person's long-term diet is connected to what kinds of bacteria live inside the gut. The intestinal tracts of folks who typically ate a high-fat, high-protein diet tended to be dominated by one kind...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013
NEUROLOGIST David Perlmutter has hit the top of the New York Times best-seller list for his provocative nutrition book, Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar - Your Brain's Silent Killers . He argues that carbohydrates (even the whole-grain carbs that we think of as the good ones) are linked to a range of modern-day maladies, including Alzheimer's, depression, headaches, epilepsy and ADHD. Since we already know the havoc that carbs can wreak on our waistlines, could he be on to something?
NEWS
September 19, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
More than two-thirds of adults in the United States are overweight or obese. But most of those who are trying to lose weight are probably failing, given the bleak data on people who manage to keep off excess weight. One of the many aids developed to help are weight loss apps for smartphones. Their usefulness is mixed, but the hunt is on to find more effective tools. Drexel University psychology professor Evan M. Forman, co-director of the Laboratory for Innovations in Health-Related Behavior Change, and his team are working on two new apps that they hope will make the weight loss quest easier.
SPORTS
January 19, 2014 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
When I tell non-runners that I'm training for a marathon, one of the first things they say - aside from that I'm crazy - is that it must be nice to eat whatever I want. If only that were the case. "Runners can eat whatever they want, but they might perform better if they eat the right food at the time times," said dietitian Nancy Clark. "You can't out-train a bad diet. " Clark, who is based in Boston, will be giving a free seminar, "Nutrition for Runners," at the Center City location of the Philadelphia Runner at 7 p.m. Thursday.
NEWS
July 15, 1998 | by Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
It was like crossing the desert on a horse with no name. OK, OK. The horse had a name. It was D.C. Maxwell's "6 Week Fat to Muscle Program" and I started it six weeks ago with the publicly stated goal of losing 20 pounds. The desert - a vast, harsh, bitter place - is a metaphor for the diet. I got thisclose. At the end of the six weeks, I lost 18 pounds, dropping from 222 to 204. Maxwell, a/k/a Coach Hardbody, predicted at the outset of the ordeal that I would not lose 20. I had set my goal too high, she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
Blimey - a British diet craze seems to be successfully invading American shores. The FastDiet , out less than a week in the United States, is already the No. 1 book at Amazon.com. That's on the heels of being the top seller for weeks in Britain, despite being published just in January. It's based on the findings by physician-journalist Michael Mosley that people can benefit from intermittent deprivation, and that occasional semi-starvation is a lot more tolerable than weeks or months of unrelenting self-denial.
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NEWS
September 19, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
More than two-thirds of adults in the United States are overweight or obese. But most of those who are trying to lose weight are probably failing, given the bleak data on people who manage to keep off excess weight. One of the many aids developed to help are weight loss apps for smartphones. Their usefulness is mixed, but the hunt is on to find more effective tools. Drexel University psychology professor Evan M. Forman, co-director of the Laboratory for Innovations in Health-Related Behavior Change, and his team are working on two new apps that they hope will make the weight loss quest easier.
NEWS
August 28, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I work in an environment where I'm usually the youngest in the room by at least a decade. This is my first real job, and it happens to be in an organization where people stay for years and years. Professionally, I don't mind, but socially I feel like I'm constantly finding myself roped into conversations about dieting and weight. I'm in my late 20s, still flying off the coattails of my youthful metabolism and the good luck of healthy habits and no medical history adding complications.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
It's always important to eat wisely, even more so when you're sick. When it comes to cancer, however, researchers are discovering tantalizing new evidence that a patient's diet can actually help shrink tumors. Nicole Simone, a radiation oncologist at Thomas Jefferson University's Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center , has been studying the effect of diet on standard therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy to see whether what you eat can make a difference. So far, it appears that it does.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | Susan A. Masino, FOR THE INQUIRER
Susan A. Masino, the Vernon Roosa Professor of Applied Science at Trinity College, studies links among metabolism, brain activity, and behavior. Brain disorders are expensive, and their costs to families and society can never be calculated fully. As a neuroscientist, I know that despite heroic research efforts our current medical treatments rarely cure neurological problems - and often can't treat them effectively. Devastating and complex problems with our fragile and amazing nervous system span all ages.
NEWS
June 16, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has agreed to let folic acid be added to corn masa flour, a change expected to spare Hispanic babies from devastating birth defects - and a change that some advocates say is long overdue. "With this approval, FDA is taking a powerful, preventive public health action," Jonca Bull, director of the FDA's Office of Minority Health, said in a statement. "Many Hispanic women don't benefit from the folic acid in cereal grain products because those products are not a mainstay of their regular diets.
NEWS
June 14, 2016
THE DAILY NEWS Pet of the Week is Max, an 8-year-old domestic medium haired cat at the Pennsylvania SPCA. Max loves to be petted and brushed, although he prefers to be petted on his head. He shows mild interest in toys, and because of his handling, he would do best in a household with children 12 and up. He also has a special diet and heart murmur. Call the PSPCA at 215-426-6300; stop by the shelter at Erie Avenue near B Street, North Philadelphia, or visit pspca.org.
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny and Julia Terruso, STAFF WRITERS
Consensus was close, but fragile. On the day Philadelphia City Council would vote on Mayor Kenney's proposed tax on sugary drinks, freshman Councilman Allan Domb found he had become a crucial swing vote. A numbers man who, as partner in a high-end restaurant chain had a personal stake in the outcome, Domb was on board - but at 1.25 cents per ounce. Kenney wanted higher. The mayor sent his financial team to Domb's office. After poring over the math, Domb locked in his vote - for 1.5 cents - and held to it in the hours to come, even as beverage lobbyists did their best to undo it. "We were having individual conversations" during the final hours before the vote, Kenney said Friday.
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Council's decision to include diet drinks in a proposed beverage tax took public-health advocates by surprise and would move the city into unstudied territory. Advocates of a soda tax for health reasons say they have never pushed to include artificially sweetened beverages, because the scientific evidence linking sugar with obesity and diabetes is so much stronger. Far from being unhappy about the development, however, some see the move as an unexpected gift. Diet beverages "are filled with artificial sweeteners and chemicals.
NEWS
June 4, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
Mayor Kenney wants a tax on sugary drinks, but City Council is considering adding diet soda to the mix, according to a memo obtained by the Inquirer that is being circulated among Council members. The letter, drafted by Council President Darrell L. Clarke's office, includes 10 alternatives to Kenney's proposed 3-cent-per-ounce tax on sugary drinks. They range from a 1-cent version of Kenney's plan to a combination of what have been seen as competing proposals: a sugary-drinks tax and a container tax. "Obviously, there are an infinite number of variations that could be considered," Clarke wrote in the letter, dated Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2016 | By Kimberly Garrison
It's a fact that physically active individuals tend to be healthier, happier, and live longer than those who are inactive and not fit. Though this is overwhelmingly true for most people, it is especially true for people suffering from inflammatory conditions like rheumatoid arthritis. Yes, you read that right. It may sound counterintuitive, but exercise is one of the best things you can do for yourself if you have arthritis. Sure, exercising is likely the last thing you want to do when you are fatigued and your joints ache, but it can help manage pain and improve your energy.
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