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NEWS
June 4, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
Mayor Kenney wants a tax on sugary drinks, but City Council is considering adding diet soda to the mix, according to a memo obtained by the Inquirer that is being circulated among Council members. The letter, drafted by Council President Darrell L. Clarke's office, includes 10 alternatives to Kenney's proposed 3-cent-per-ounce tax on sugary drinks. They range from a 1-cent version of Kenney's plan to a combination of what have been seen as competing proposals: a sugary-drinks tax and a container tax. "Obviously, there are an infinite number of variations that could be considered," Clarke wrote in the letter, dated Wednesday.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny and Julia Terruso, STAFF WRITERS
Less than an hour after saying she planned to introduce a real-estate tax increase, City Councilwoman Cindy Bass pulled the plan late Tuesday, saying Mayor Kenney had secured the votes to pass a tax on sugary drinks. The deal is surely tentative, but Council sources said members seemed to be coalescing around a 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax on sugary beverages and diet soda. Kenney's spokeswoman, Lauren Hitt, would not comment, saying that "as a councilman for 20 some years, Mayor Kenney knows how important it is to respect Council's process.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
ON YOUR scorecards, it's a preliminary win for Jim Kenney and a loss for the beverage industry - and not just the sugary piece of it. Other losers are soda drinkers and retailers who sell it. The mayor's win came despite a rabbit punch to City Council on Wednesday afternoon. The rabbit punch came in the form of an admission during the hearing by city Finance Director Rob Dubow that - did we neglect to mention this? - a large chunk of the tax would be used to fill a hole in the city's fund balance, which is important to Philly's bond rating.
NEWS
June 16, 2016
By Ronald D. Castille Mayor Kenney and City Council are in the process of violating the Pennsylvania Constitution by enacting a tax on each ounce of sugar-sweetened beverages and - after the latest legislative shenanigans - certain diet beverages. It is beyond dispute that only the state legislature can determine where and on what items a tax can be imposed. Harrisburg is why we in Philadelphia pay an 8 percent sales tax instead of the 6 percent sales tax in other parts of the commonwealth.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2011 | By JANE J. LEE, San Jose Mercury News
SAN JOSE, Calif. - No good deed goes unpunished, and that seems to include people who virtuously reach for diet sodas instead of the calorie-laden good stuff. Before guzzling that artificially sweetened beverage in a haze of guilt-free carbonation, bear in mind that your diet soda may only be adding to your bottom line - or your waistline. At least that's the conclusion of a recently completed 12-year study. The study looked at 474 people, ages 65 to 74, and found that, on average, those who drank diet sodas ended up with waistlines that increased three times more than those who avoided them.
NEWS
April 5, 2011
THE MOVIE THEATER industry made a scene - to put it mildly - when it looked as if the U.S. Food and Drug Administration might make theaters list the calorie counts in the tubs of popcorn they sell at exorbitant prices. As part of the Affordable Care Act, establishments with more than 20 locations - restaurants, convenience stores, groceries, even vending machines - will have to tell consumers the calorie counts of what they are buying. The sticker shock may persuade Americans to buy healthier foods, and restaurants to offer better choices.
NEWS
June 7, 2016
THE STORY so far: Fulfilling a campaign promise, Mayor Kenney advances a plan to offer prekindergarten to all Philadelphia children financed by a three-cent-an-ounce tax on sugary sodas and drinks. The $95 million Kenney says will be raised by the tax will be used to subsidize pre-K but also feed a fund to step up repairs on recreation centers, libraries, police stations, and other city buildings. City Council embraces the pre-K and repairs to buildings in their districts, but hems and haws over the sugary-drink tax. Some of them ask: Can't the money be found elsewhere?
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: My husband of three years and I have finally gotten to where it is practical to try to start a family. We've known for a few years that I have a fertility problem that gets progressively worse each month, but we weren't ready so we decided to wait. I have given up everything I am supposed to including alcohol and caffeine, even caffeine-free diet soda at his request, and am taking dance classes twice a week to try to get to a healthier weight. I am active and only 15 pounds overweight.
FOOD
May 21, 1986 | By SNEH CHOWDHRY and CAROL LIFTMAN, Special to the Daily News
On the Society Hill Diet you will lose from 8-10 pounds a month. Because this is a slow, gradual weight loss, you shouldn't feel deprived - even of your favorite foods. Here's a list of "cheats" - things you can splurge on three times a week. TREATS (150-200 CALORIES) 3/4 cup ice milk or sherbert 1/2 cup custard or pudding 1 small ice cream bar or ice cream sandwich 1 slice angel food cake 1 iced cup cake 3 average cookies 1 donut without jelly or cream 1 candy bar which is 200 calories or less 1 individual serving bag of potato chips, pretzels, corn chips, taco chips Double serving from "crackers" 8 ounces of wine 16 ounces of beer 3 ounces of alcohol (gin, vodka, whiskey)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2016 | By Kimberly Garrison
The vernal equinox ushers in the first day of spring this Sunday. Not everyone welcomes the change, though. Many have anxiety over the prospect of shedding winter coats for more revealing warm-weather clothes and are now searching for ways to get fit fast. Maybe you're considering one of the usual crazy diets - the master cleanse! The grapefruit diet! The cabbage soup diet! But have you ever considered trying something more practical, like a booze break? I know, we've all been led to believe modest alcohol consumption is good for our health.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 16, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX Kenney's sleight of hand Mayor Kenney was very clever about the sugary-beverage tax ("New soda tax plan: 11/2 cents," Thursday). First, more than half of its revenue was earmarked for prekindergarten. What politician would go on record opposing that? Second, it was to be a tax on sugary drinks, so it could be an inducement to improved health. Now the tax will be levied on diet drinks as well. Third, since the tax will be charged to distributors, consumers and store owners would be spared.
NEWS
June 16, 2016
By Ronald D. Castille Mayor Kenney and City Council are in the process of violating the Pennsylvania Constitution by enacting a tax on each ounce of sugar-sweetened beverages and - after the latest legislative shenanigans - certain diet beverages. It is beyond dispute that only the state legislature can determine where and on what items a tax can be imposed. Harrisburg is why we in Philadelphia pay an 8 percent sales tax instead of the 6 percent sales tax in other parts of the commonwealth.
NEWS
June 15, 2016
By Joseph J. DeFelice During the months-long debate about Mayor Kenney's proposed soda tax, we heard the same argument over and over: This is for the kids. Now, as Council has advanced a "compromise" bill that is likely to pass Thursday, an eleventh-hour change means that much of the revenue is going to a slew of the mayor's distinctly non-child-related priorities. This includes $41 million over four years for the city's general fund - from your pocket to the city's coffers. Yes, all those children they trucked in for "read-ins" at City Hall were unwittingly supporting our spiraling pension costs and opaque city contracts, which city Democrats are loath to address.
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Council's decision to include diet drinks in a proposed beverage tax took public-health advocates by surprise and would move the city into unstudied territory. Advocates of a soda tax for health reasons say they have never pushed to include artificially sweetened beverages, because the scientific evidence linking sugar with obesity and diabetes is so much stronger. Far from being unhappy about the development, however, some see the move as an unexpected gift. Diet beverages "are filled with artificial sweeteners and chemicals.
NEWS
June 10, 2016
On your score cards, it's a preliminary win for Jim Kenney and a loss for the beverage industry - and not just the sugary piece of it. Other losers are soda drinkers and retailers who sell it. The mayor's win came despite a rabbit punch to City Council Wednesday afternoon. The rabbit punch came in the form of an admission during the hearing by city finance director Rob Dubow that - did we neglect to mention this? - a large chunk of the tax would be used to fill a hole in the city's fund balance, which is important to Philly's bond rating.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
ON YOUR scorecards, it's a preliminary win for Jim Kenney and a loss for the beverage industry - and not just the sugary piece of it. Other losers are soda drinkers and retailers who sell it. The mayor's win came despite a rabbit punch to City Council on Wednesday afternoon. The rabbit punch came in the form of an admission during the hearing by city Finance Director Rob Dubow that - did we neglect to mention this? - a large chunk of the tax would be used to fill a hole in the city's fund balance, which is important to Philly's bond rating.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny and Julia Terruso, STAFF WRITERS
Less than an hour after saying she planned to introduce a real-estate tax increase, City Councilwoman Cindy Bass pulled the plan late Tuesday, saying Mayor Kenney had secured the votes to pass a tax on sugary drinks. The deal is surely tentative, but Council sources said members seemed to be coalescing around a 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax on sugary beverages and diet soda. Kenney's spokeswoman, Lauren Hitt, would not comment, saying that "as a councilman for 20 some years, Mayor Kenney knows how important it is to respect Council's process.
NEWS
June 7, 2016
THE STORY so far: Fulfilling a campaign promise, Mayor Kenney advances a plan to offer prekindergarten to all Philadelphia children financed by a three-cent-an-ounce tax on sugary sodas and drinks. The $95 million Kenney says will be raised by the tax will be used to subsidize pre-K but also feed a fund to step up repairs on recreation centers, libraries, police stations, and other city buildings. City Council embraces the pre-K and repairs to buildings in their districts, but hems and haws over the sugary-drink tax. Some of them ask: Can't the money be found elsewhere?
NEWS
June 4, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
Mayor Kenney wants a tax on sugary drinks, but City Council is considering adding diet soda to the mix, according to a memo obtained by the Inquirer that is being circulated among Council members. The letter, drafted by Council President Darrell L. Clarke's office, includes 10 alternatives to Kenney's proposed 3-cent-per-ounce tax on sugary drinks. They range from a 1-cent version of Kenney's plan to a combination of what have been seen as competing proposals: a sugary-drinks tax and a container tax. "Obviously, there are an infinite number of variations that could be considered," Clarke wrote in the letter, dated Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2016 | By Kimberly Garrison
The vernal equinox ushers in the first day of spring this Sunday. Not everyone welcomes the change, though. Many have anxiety over the prospect of shedding winter coats for more revealing warm-weather clothes and are now searching for ways to get fit fast. Maybe you're considering one of the usual crazy diets - the master cleanse! The grapefruit diet! The cabbage soup diet! But have you ever considered trying something more practical, like a booze break? I know, we've all been led to believe modest alcohol consumption is good for our health.
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