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Digital Age

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NEWS
August 26, 2011 | By Michael Tarm, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Wrestling with the challenges of documents in the digital age, U.S. officials are destroying millions of paper federal court records to save storage costs. But the effort is raising the ire of some historians, private detectives, and others who rely heavily on the files. The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration says at least 10 million bankruptcy case files and several million District Court files from between 1970 and 1995 will be shredded, pounded to pulp, and recycled.
NEWS
September 26, 2012
By Frank Cerabino Dear Apple: Congratulations on the introduction of the iPhone 5. I continue to be impressed with your company's ability to keep finding new devices for consumers to buy. Which brings me to the purpose of this note. Here's a story you might find interesting: In South Florida recently, a man walked into a Wells Fargo bank and handed the teller his smartphone. Rather than writing a note on paper to announce his bank robbery, the man tried making a digital presentation of his stickup demands.
NEWS
November 11, 2000
What are the values [for the Digital Age]? For me, they are best expressed in a modern idea of community. At the heart of it is the belief in equal worth, which is the central belief that drives my politics - and in our mutual responsibility in creating a society that advances such equal worth. Note: it is equal worth, not equality of income or outcome; or simply equality of opportunity. It affirms our equal right to dignity, liberty and economic opportunity, as well as freedom from discrimination.
NEWS
April 19, 1998 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1985, when the last major revision of the Encyclopaedia Britannica was published, it distilled the world into 32 hefty volumes containing 44 million words. But two words were absent from the venerable encyclopedia, words that would soon threaten its existence: CD-ROM and Internet. That same year, the first encyclopedia published on CD-ROM was issued, using text only. Within a few years, the contents of huge encyclopedias of thousands of pages would be contained on small, silvery disks that would come to life with movies and animations and sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2007 | Reprinted from Wednesday's editions By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Oh no, not another cyber-thriller: the urgent clickety-clack of computer keyboards, frantic geeks thumbing their PDAs, evil Web wizards deploying viral downloads, server farms put out of service by a dastardly ring of digital terrorists. And who's going to save the day? John McClane, that two-fisted, old-school New York City cop from a trio of vintage Die Hards , that's who. The guy probably doesn't even own a PC. In Live Free or Die Hard , the fourth installment in Bruce Willis' blow-'em-up blockbuster franchise - and the first in 12 long years - gigabytes and fisticuffs collide.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2012 | Joe DiStefano
How many lawyers does it take to tell a professor when he can make copies from a digital book? Lots, so far. Digital distribution ought to make scholarship easy to spread, and cheap. Especially at a time when college expenses — most of which don't go for instructors or texts, but for buildings, administration, marketing, and other nonacademic needs — are driving young Americans deep into debt. But textbook publishers are as reluctant as music publishers to give their product away for free, digital or not. So, in the absence of new law from Congress or Supreme Court rulings, university counselors have been urging professors to pay extra licensing fees for anything they copy — boosting the cost and time spent assembling coursework.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The last time a student at Archbishop Wood High School borrowed Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was 1997. Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island has fared even worse: No student has checked out the adventure novel since 1991. It could be they are simply dated and unappealing to today's high school students, or it could be because they are, well, books in an age of proliferating digital information. Either way, these titles may not be on Archbishop Wood's shelves much longer: By the end of the school year, the number of volumes in the school's library will be whittled from 47,000 to about 1,000 to make room for a new bank of computers, projection equipment, and collaborative space.
NEWS
October 8, 2012
Eric Newton is senior adviser to the president at the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation in Miami. The digital age is changing almost everything about journalism - who a journalist is, what a story is, which media should provide news when and where people want it, and how we engage with communities. The only thing that isn't changing is the why of journalism. We still need good, honest, independent reporting - the fair, accurate, contextual search for truth - to run our communities and our lives.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2003 | By Markus Verbeet INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It sounds like a perfect business world for a store owner. "From my 15 major competitors in town, there is hardly anybody left," Steve Serota said. That would normally make him a happy businessman, except that he had to close Camera Care, his Center City store, last month. After spending almost half his life selling cameras in his Arch Street shop, the 52-year-old merchant was instead stuffing lens filters and other unsold inventory into huge black garbage bags. "It's a tragedy," he said.
NEWS
October 21, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Media Network was chosen Monday as one of three news organizations that will partner with Temple University to help accelerate their digital transformation, using a $1.3 million grant from the Knight Foundation. The Knight-Temple Table Stakes project seeks to test new mobile and digital practices through changes in technology, work flow, and job roles. Philadelphia Media Network - parent company of The Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com - was selected for the project along with the Dallas Morning News and the Miami Herald.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | David Haas
David Haas is vice chair of Wyncote Foundation, a member of the board of managers of the Institute for Journalism in New Media, and a board member of Media Impact Funders The extraordinary gift by Gerry Lenfest in donating The Philadelphia Inquirer, Daily News, and Philly.com to the newly formed nonprofit Institute for Journalism in New Media places Philadelphia at the center of a disruptive storm sweeping all legacy media and accomplishes two...
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
I'm nude, sunbathing in my backyard. Bzzz ... here comes your drone, taking a good, long look. Have you just violated my constitutional rights? A police officer shoots a black man. The whole webbed, Internetted world instantly knows all about it. Can the officer possibly get a fair trial anywhere? You really hate your high-school principal. So, in your own bedroom, you post on social media to call out his lunatic, ugly stench. Should your school be able to suspend you?
NEWS
October 21, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Media Network was chosen Monday as one of three news organizations that will partner with Temple University to help accelerate their digital transformation, using a $1.3 million grant from the Knight Foundation. The Knight-Temple Table Stakes project seeks to test new mobile and digital practices through changes in technology, work flow, and job roles. Philadelphia Media Network - parent company of The Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com - was selected for the project along with the Dallas Morning News and the Miami Herald.
NEWS
September 2, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Rutgers-Camden students assiduously avoided studying in the dark, dusty library basement, crammed in between book stacks with asbestos tile and the ghostly noises of a building built in the middle of the last century. Not that things were ideal elsewhere in the library, where book stacks across two floors limited seating and study areas, a lack of electrical outlets led students to bring their own extension cords, and piecemeal furniture replacement led to a grab-bag vision of interior design.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
West Philadelphia-based photographer Kyle Cassidy has made a career of sidestepping political land mines as he dives deep into American subcultures. Consider, for example, his 2007 book Armed America: Portraits of Gun Owners in Their Homes. But in February, he published a photo essay that really touched a nerve. The subject? Librarians. "Certainly, the gun book was much less controversial," he said. Cassidy's photographs - taken at the American Library Association (ALA)
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Reuben Kramer, For The Inquirer
Lub-dub. Lub-dub. That's the sound of a healthy heart. Lub-dub-dub. Lub-dub-dub. That's the sound of one about to fail. It's called a gallop rhythm, and like so many other sounds of heart trouble, it's virtually inaudible to the unaided human ear. Aid came in 1816 when French doctor Rene Laennec took some paper, rolled it tightly, and placed one end of the tube against a patient's chest. The stethoscope was born. Now, nearing its bicentennial, it's doing things Laennec couldn't have imagined.
NEWS
January 11, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like a thunderbolt, the decision hit the news with a crash. Calling it "almost Orwellian," U.S. District Judge Richard Leon in Washington found on Dec. 17 that the National Security Agency's collection of telephone data - of practically every call made by every U.S. resident - likely violated the Constitution. "It's one thing to say that people expect phone companies to occasionally provide information to law enforcement," Leon wrote in a case brought by a Torresdale man. "It is quite another to suggest that our citizens expect all phone companies to operate . . . a joint intelligence-gathering operation with the government.
NEWS
June 2, 2013
Before Midnight Julie Delpy and Ethan Hawke revisit their Celine and Jesse characters - married now, with twin daughters, and just winding down a summer vacation on the coast of Greece. Walking and talking and fighting and loving, and essential viewing for fans of Before Sunrise and Before Sunset. This one, too, is from director Richard Linklater. R The East Brit Marling stars in, and cowrote, this thriller about a freelance intelligence agent who infiltrates a band of radical freegans conspiring to bring down a big pharmaceutical company.
NEWS
January 27, 2013
With so many millions of Americans finding the information they need by tapping away on a smartphone or other digital device, it comes as a welcome surprise that there aren't more empty seats at the local public library. In fact, a survey just released by the Pew Research Center's Internet and American Life Project shows that nearly two out of three people in their mid-teens and older, say they used a library during the previous 12 months. Almost universally held is the view that "public libraries are important to their communities," Pew reports.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The last time a student at Archbishop Wood High School borrowed Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was 1997. Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island has fared even worse: No student has checked out the adventure novel since 1991. It could be they are simply dated and unappealing to today's high school students, or it could be because they are, well, books in an age of proliferating digital information. Either way, these titles may not be on Archbishop Wood's shelves much longer: By the end of the school year, the number of volumes in the school's library will be whittled from 47,000 to about 1,000 to make room for a new bank of computers, projection equipment, and collaborative space.
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