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Digital Photography

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NEWS
May 5, 2002 | By Will Van Sant INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Film is a four-letter word. So declare two veteran photographers who have embraced the cutting-edge world of digital photography and created a new business venture on Main Street. The Pixel Place: Digital Photography & Education Center is the brainchild of Bob Laramie of Moorestown and Jon Falk of Haddon Township. Both men, who have about 60 years of professional photo experience between them, got their start using traditional film cameras. Now, they avoid those like the plague.
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward Bogosian, 82, longtime owner of the Camera Shop of Bryn Mawr, died Saturday, May 11, of bone cancer at his home in Villanova. The Camera Shop was established by Sarkis Bogosian, Mr. Bogosian's father, in 1920, making it among the state's oldest family-run camera stores, his family said. The onset of the Internet, the change to digital photography, the prevalence of big-box stores carrying photo equipment, and poor economic conditions combined to defeat many of the store's competitors.
NEWS
October 15, 2006 | By Kerry O'Connor FOR THE INQUIRER
In a corner of the new photography lab at Burlington County College's Willingboro campus, instructor David Freese studies Chris Dilouie's picture - a black-and-white image of a light pole and leafless tree in front of the campus building. "Very surreal," Freese said. "Are you a surreal photographer?" "I don't know," Dilouie, 18, responded, shrugging his shoulders. "You'll find out," said Freese, deciding that the contrast and composition of the picture would make it perfect for development.
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | By Michael Hinkelman, Daily News Staff Writer
TYLER Gil-Contreras of Menlo Park, Calif., will travel to another state Monday for the first time in his life — here, for a weeklong visit.   Gil-Contreras, 17, is one of 11 teens who won a national arts competition that showcases digital skills learned through the Boys & Girls Clubs of America, or BGCA. The winners, who are getting an an all-expenses-paid trip to Philly, will be honored for their work at a ceremony Monday night at One Comcast Center. While here, they will attend workshops at Comcast and explore mural arts and historic sites.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2005 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Eastman Kodak Co. yesterday posted its third straight quarterly loss and said it would lay off up to 10,000 more people because its film business was declining much faster than the company had anticipated. The latest cuts will be in addition to the 15,000 positions it said it would eliminate in a 2004 announcement. After the job cuts and with additions from acquisitions, the company's workforce will be nearly 50,000. The layoffs come as the firm that turned picture-taking into a hobby for the masses navigates a tough transition from film to digital photography.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2013
WITH BEING a real-life Cosby kid come the inevitable questions: What's Bill Cosby up to? What does he think about Temple University's controversial decision to cut its track-and-field program? Did you catch his recent appearance with Jon Stewart on Comedy Central's "The Daily Show"? Does Bill still eat Jell-O pudding? No, I didn't ask his daughter that. It wouldn't have mattered if I did, though, because Erinn Cosby, 46, wouldn't have gone there with me anyway. When we chatted last week by phone, she politely declined to answer questions about her uber-famous dad. Erinn, the second oldest of Cosby's four daughters, preferred to steer away from the personal and instead focus on her photography exhibit at Art Sanctuary, called "The Extension of Beauty," which runs through Jan. 31. It's a spin-off of a popular exhibit of Erinn Cosby's work that Art Sanctuary staged in May as part of the 29th annual Celebration of Black Writing.
NEWS
October 29, 1995 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
To the 526 students in the Medford Lakes School District, the 52 new computers are better than pencils and crayons. To their teachers, they are an integral part of the curriculum. To members of the school board, they are a valuable community resource. For the first time, all students in the K-8 district have daily access to computers, thanks to a $200,000 state grant, School Superintendent Debra Bruner said. Two years ago, the state Department of Education awarded the district the funds, in part because of a steep drop in regaulr state aid. Since the funds could be used only for new teaching initiatives, the school earmarked them for portable computers and for a computer lab to be housed in the former typing lab at the Neeta School, one of two schools in the district.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
WASHINGTON - Deaths behind the wheel of an automobile fell last year to the lowest level since the Truman administration, but there was an increase in fatalities among bicyclists, pedestrians, motorcycle riders and big-rig truck drivers, according to federal figures released Monday. Overall, traffic deaths dropped to 32,367, almost 2 percent lower than the 2010 total, and a 26 percent decline since a peak in 2005. The downward national trend began before the recession took some drivers off the roads, and it accelerated last year.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2002 | By John J. Fried INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Threading through the exhibits and dipping into the seminars at the Comdex high-tech trade show this week, it was too easy to come to this conclusion: The technology industry's problem is not a post-Internet-bubble hangover, smaller corporate technology budgets, or fraudulent accounting. It's a lack of inventiveness. Except for maybe the astonishing Segway Human Transporter, there was precious little to ooh and aah about at the industry's premier gathering, and no indication this would change in the near future.
NEWS
November 12, 1999 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The Gizmo: Panasonic PalmCam PV-SD4090 SuperDisk Digital Camera, available in December for $999. Info: 800-211-PANA or www.panasonic.com Why we care: For the last couple of years, the top-selling digital still cameras have been Sony Mavica models. Their hit status hasn't happened because the devices capture images electronically with the highest of quality (they don't), but largely because the cameras record on 1.44-megabyte floppy disks. Floppies sell for a tiny fraction of the cost of the solid-state memory chips usually used for image storage with digital cameras.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2013
WITH BEING a real-life Cosby kid come the inevitable questions: What's Bill Cosby up to? What does he think about Temple University's controversial decision to cut its track-and-field program? Did you catch his recent appearance with Jon Stewart on Comedy Central's "The Daily Show"? Does Bill still eat Jell-O pudding? No, I didn't ask his daughter that. It wouldn't have mattered if I did, though, because Erinn Cosby, 46, wouldn't have gone there with me anyway. When we chatted last week by phone, she politely declined to answer questions about her uber-famous dad. Erinn, the second oldest of Cosby's four daughters, preferred to steer away from the personal and instead focus on her photography exhibit at Art Sanctuary, called "The Extension of Beauty," which runs through Jan. 31. It's a spin-off of a popular exhibit of Erinn Cosby's work that Art Sanctuary staged in May as part of the 29th annual Celebration of Black Writing.
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward Bogosian, 82, longtime owner of the Camera Shop of Bryn Mawr, died Saturday, May 11, of bone cancer at his home in Villanova. The Camera Shop was established by Sarkis Bogosian, Mr. Bogosian's father, in 1920, making it among the state's oldest family-run camera stores, his family said. The onset of the Internet, the change to digital photography, the prevalence of big-box stores carrying photo equipment, and poor economic conditions combined to defeat many of the store's competitors.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
WASHINGTON - Deaths behind the wheel of an automobile fell last year to the lowest level since the Truman administration, but there was an increase in fatalities among bicyclists, pedestrians, motorcycle riders and big-rig truck drivers, according to federal figures released Monday. Overall, traffic deaths dropped to 32,367, almost 2 percent lower than the 2010 total, and a 26 percent decline since a peak in 2005. The downward national trend began before the recession took some drivers off the roads, and it accelerated last year.
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | By Michael Hinkelman, Daily News Staff Writer
TYLER Gil-Contreras of Menlo Park, Calif., will travel to another state Monday for the first time in his life — here, for a weeklong visit.   Gil-Contreras, 17, is one of 11 teens who won a national arts competition that showcases digital skills learned through the Boys & Girls Clubs of America, or BGCA. The winners, who are getting an an all-expenses-paid trip to Philly, will be honored for their work at a ceremony Monday night at One Comcast Center. While here, they will attend workshops at Comcast and explore mural arts and historic sites.
NEWS
June 9, 2008 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William H. Stroud, 65, a journalist and electronic-publishing pioneer who led the transition of The Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News from typewriters to computers, died Friday of prostate cancer at Roxborough Memorial Hospital. He lived in West Mount Airy. Mr. Stroud, the son of a teacher and cotton farmer, grew up in McGehee, Ark., where he played football and was a champion shot putter. He studied at Hendrix College in Conway, Ark., for three years before earning a bachelor's degree in history in 1964 from the University of Iowa.
NEWS
October 15, 2006 | By Kerry O'Connor FOR THE INQUIRER
In a corner of the new photography lab at Burlington County College's Willingboro campus, instructor David Freese studies Chris Dilouie's picture - a black-and-white image of a light pole and leafless tree in front of the campus building. "Very surreal," Freese said. "Are you a surreal photographer?" "I don't know," Dilouie, 18, responded, shrugging his shoulders. "You'll find out," said Freese, deciding that the contrast and composition of the picture would make it perfect for development.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2005 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Eastman Kodak Co. yesterday posted its third straight quarterly loss and said it would lay off up to 10,000 more people because its film business was declining much faster than the company had anticipated. The latest cuts will be in addition to the 15,000 positions it said it would eliminate in a 2004 announcement. After the job cuts and with additions from acquisitions, the company's workforce will be nearly 50,000. The layoffs come as the firm that turned picture-taking into a hobby for the masses navigates a tough transition from film to digital photography.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2002 | By John J. Fried INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Threading through the exhibits and dipping into the seminars at the Comdex high-tech trade show this week, it was too easy to come to this conclusion: The technology industry's problem is not a post-Internet-bubble hangover, smaller corporate technology budgets, or fraudulent accounting. It's a lack of inventiveness. Except for maybe the astonishing Segway Human Transporter, there was precious little to ooh and aah about at the industry's premier gathering, and no indication this would change in the near future.
NEWS
May 5, 2002 | By Will Van Sant INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Film is a four-letter word. So declare two veteran photographers who have embraced the cutting-edge world of digital photography and created a new business venture on Main Street. The Pixel Place: Digital Photography & Education Center is the brainchild of Bob Laramie of Moorestown and Jon Falk of Haddon Township. Both men, who have about 60 years of professional photo experience between them, got their start using traditional film cameras. Now, they avoid those like the plague.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2002 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nick Kelsh, an accomplished Philadelphia photographer, felt like a newbie last summer when, for the first time in his decades-long career, he showed up at a portrait shoot with a digital camera and laptop computer. "I felt like I was on thin ice, like I was a pioneer or something," said Kelsh, a commercial photographer with several books to his credit. "It was nerve-wracking. " Professional photography is speed-marching from old-fashioned film to digital imaging. Some photographers say it is still too soon to make a complete transition.
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