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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
"Digital Deluxe" at the Philadelphia Art Alliance announces the crest of a powerful wave that is washing across contemporary art. It's digital technology, which is revolutionizing most art media. Art Alliance curator Amy Ingrid Schlegel has selected 14 artists from Philadelphia and elsewhere to demonstrate some of the innovations and transformations that computers enable artists to achieve. The show doesn't announce major breakthroughs; it consolidates a broad spectrum of digital practice into a neat package.
NEWS
January 26, 2003 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Lisa Rysinger is celebrating some firsts. She was among the first group of students to receive a degree from the master's in writing program at Rowan University in Glassboro in 2001 and is the first out of that class to receive a contract to write her first book. Rysinger, 31, also a teacher at Camden County College, is the owner of Camden County-based Video Imagery Digitally Enhanced Productions Inc. She said her first passion - digital technology - led her to study at Rowan.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2006 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
One need not necessarily understand Elizabeth Leister's video installation Every Body Is Everywhere and Nowhere to appreciate it. The piece, which occupies the walls of the Morris Gallery at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, is as enigmatic as any John Ashbery poem, but it is also oddly familiar in the way that Ashbery's poems are. In the gallery, the viewer watches Leister's daily Webcast of herself drawing and then erasing the...
BUSINESS
December 1, 1997 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gary S. Shaber filmed 25 typical chest X-rays in a research project at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in the summer. He then gave the same patients a second round of chest X-rays from a special, filmless machine that produced digital X-ray images. Digital beat film every time, he found. It was especially good at revealing detail in the lungs, said Shaber, a radiologist. "You don't have to be a physician to see that there's a significant difference," he added as he showed off the sharply etched innards of several chests last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1995 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
With all the thunderous explosions that have lit up the screen this summer, it is the not-so-big bang which sends the spacecraft spinning toward catastrophe in Apollo 13 that has registered with the highest impact. Ron Howard recruited an army of special-effects wizards for his majestic and moving epic: They put us inside outer space and rendered the pivotal moment of looming disaster with chilling reality. And in this deafening summer of blockbusters at the movies, of all the touted, high-tech spectaculars - from Die Hard With a Vengeance to Waterworld - only Apollo 13 boasts writing, acting and direction that can equal its truly awesome and very special effects.
NEWS
May 5, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
The Please Touch Museum, which emerged debt-free from bankruptcy in March, received grant of $750,000 to be paid over two years from the Pew Center for Arts & Heritage, the Philadelphia children's museum said Wednesday. The Pew money will be used to help expand the museum's reach to children 10 and older by researching and developing ways to integrate digital technology into Please Touch's traditional hands-on learning approach. In the first phase of research, the museum will use 1,000 square feet of existing exhibit space to pilot new exhibits that incoroporate digital elements, while examining the "motivations and concerns of parents regarding the use of media as part of their children's education and entertainment experiences," Please Touch said.
NEWS
May 23, 1997 | by Scott Williams, New York Daily News
HARD ROCK LIVE, 8 p.m. Sunday, VH1. Take a live rock concert. Add six video cameras - one on a crane, two on pedestals and three roaming free. Turn on the amplifiers and microphones. Then mix. And you still won't have VH1's "Hard Rock Live," unless you bring in executive producer Robert Small and his team to pull it all together. "All our people are music people," with a goal to bring out the best and show the best in their guests, Small said. Viewers can catch up on the results when VH1 presents a one-hour best-of "Hard Rock Live" special at 8 p.m. Sunday, featuring Jewel, Robert Palmer, Chicago, Lou Reed, Cheap Trick and Paula Cole.
NEWS
August 18, 2003
Re the recent comments in the Daily News by the executive director of the Philadelphia Parking Authority, and by the majority and minority chairmen of the House Transportation Committee, regarding the decision to require the exclusive use of only 35mm wet film in the red-light camera program in Philadelphia, rather than allowing consideration of digital technology as well: My concern is not with what technology will be used. It is that we open the procurement process to allow the experts, not the politicians, to choose the best product.
NEWS
April 5, 2000 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The latest movie to be shot in Philadelphia, "Jesus' Son," will be the opening-night selection for this year's Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema. PFWC 2000, the ninth annual festival, commences April 27 with a screening of "Jesus' Son," starring Holly Hunter, Dennis Hopper and Billy Crudup ("Waking the Dead"), a surreal, impressionist story of a drug addict's search for redemption in the 1970s. The festival runs through May 7, with a roster of more than 100 movies (18 feature debuts)
BUSINESS
March 11, 2002 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New parents now give out a Web address for baby's first pictures. Snapshots from the grandparents' road trip arrive by e-mail. And Uncle Joe's interminable holiday slide show is on compact disc. The subjects may not have changed, but photography itself is being transformed by digital technology. Digital camera prices are falling, and some of the latest cameras represent breakthroughs in digital picture quality and ease of use. In addition, Microsoft Corp.'s latest operating system, Windows XP, has built-in features for organizing and e-mailing digital photos.
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NEWS
May 5, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
The Please Touch Museum, which emerged debt-free from bankruptcy in March, received grant of $750,000 to be paid over two years from the Pew Center for Arts & Heritage, the Philadelphia children's museum said Wednesday. The Pew money will be used to help expand the museum's reach to children 10 and older by researching and developing ways to integrate digital technology into Please Touch's traditional hands-on learning approach. In the first phase of research, the museum will use 1,000 square feet of existing exhibit space to pilot new exhibits that incoroporate digital elements, while examining the "motivations and concerns of parents regarding the use of media as part of their children's education and entertainment experiences," Please Touch said.
NEWS
December 8, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Slipping inside a red wooden booth containing a computer tablet mounted on a wall, Rutgers-Camden students typed in their names, interests, or whatever word popped into their heads. The Typomatic returned a list of words, some with no apparent connection and others political, poignant, or just funny: STARWARS transformed to STORYLESS , FREEDOM to THUGGERY , LEBRON to LEGEND . The pairs match visually when cut in half horizontally, according to a typeface designed by an artist behind the Typomatic machine.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Starnes Walker was a newly minted physicist and Navy electronic-weapons veteran in the 1970s, his job at Phillips Petroleum Corp. included finding ways to replace human oil-refinery operators, who once hand-checked miles of pipes, with digitally networked monitors and switches. "So that, now, valves are controlled by computers," Walker says, from his office in a converted Chrysler factory, where he heads the University of Delaware's new Cybersecurity Initiative. That digital technology had far-reaching results: It's part of the reason the brightly lit refineries that still line the rivers near Houston and Philadelphia now employ hundreds of workers each, not thousands.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Internet and digital technology have had a huge and ongoing effect on how arts organizations reach their audiences, manage operations, determine programming, deploy resources, and raise funds, according to a new report from the Washington-based Pew Research Center's Internet and American Life Project, released Friday. The more than 1,200 U.S. arts organizations polled agreed that technology and the Web have worked to broaden "the boundaries of what is considered art. " Many of the 1,244 organizations, drawn from recipients of funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, also said that use of websites, mobile apps, video streaming, and the like have strained resources, and they complained that funders have been slow to support tech and social media-based projects.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer
OF THE MYRIAD elements that make "West Side Story" arguably the greatest film musical of all time, the score by Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim ranks near or at the top. This weekend that music will take center stage (as it were) as the 1961 movie version of the groundbreaking Broadway smash is screened at the Kimmel Center. What makes this showing so special is that, thanks to the marvels of digital technology, the music will be performed live by the Philadelphia Orchestra. According to Los Angeles-based David Newman, who will conduct the orchestra, the original score was taken off a digital, high-definition version of the film, and put on a hard drive, which is how the movie can be screened without its soundtrack.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I WOULDN'T NORMALLY feel sorry for a man like Bernie Cohen. At 86, he's had a vibrant life. He's been married to the same sweetheart, Selma, for more than six decades and is a proud father and grandfather. Although he's long retired as a clinical psychologist, he's still a professor emeritus at West Chester University, where he taught for years. And he had a fine career in private practice and managed a bustling psychiatric clinic in Norristown. He may move a little slowly, but his wits are quick and his eyes crinkle when he delivers the punch line of a favorite joke.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2012 | Associated Press
ROCHESTER, N.Y. - Picture it: Kodak is exiting the camera business. Eastman Kodak Co. said Thursday that it would stop making digital cameras, pocket video cameras, and digital picture frames in a move that marks the end of an era for the beleaguered 132-year-old company. Founded by George Eastman in 1880, Kodak was known all over the world for iconic cameras, such as the Brownie and the Instamatic. For the last few decades, however, the Rochester-based company has struggled.
NEWS
June 30, 2011 | By Helen Shen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maryanne Porter's class was chattering away - in complete silence. It was a "Twiducation" day in her ninth-grade environmental science class at Academy Park High School, and students were furiously typing their thoughts on river pollution to an online message board interface. "It's a great equalizer," the Sharon Hill teacher said of the website, twiducate.com, finding that online interaction gives many shyer students a voice to participate more fully. Social media were among technologies featured this week at the 32d annual conference of the International Society for Technology in Education, which ended Wednesday and drew an estimated 18,000 people from 70 countries to the Convention Center.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Praised by police, criticized by scenic conservationists and driver-safety groups, and hugely profitable for their owners, digital billboards are about to enter the Philadelphia area. ClearChannel Outdoor, the largest outdoor advertising company, announced that it would have eight 14-by-48-foot video billboards - with images or ad messages that change every eight seconds - on major highways this year from Bucks County through the city and south into Delaware County. ClearChannel did not waste time.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2006 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
One need not necessarily understand Elizabeth Leister's video installation Every Body Is Everywhere and Nowhere to appreciate it. The piece, which occupies the walls of the Morris Gallery at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, is as enigmatic as any John Ashbery poem, but it is also oddly familiar in the way that Ashbery's poems are. In the gallery, the viewer watches Leister's daily Webcast of herself drawing and then erasing the...
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