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Digital Video

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BUSINESS
December 10, 1999 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mike Harris had deep affection for Commodore's Amiga computer. In fact, after graduating from Purdue University in the early 1990s, he relocated to King of Prussia to be near the Commodore headquarters and design circuit boards for the Amiga. To his delight, he found the Amiga all he had hoped for technologically. To his dismay, he found that Commodore, based in West Chester, was badly mismanaged and about to go bust. Out of work and far from his Indiana home, Harris, along with another Amiga stalwart, Gregg Garnick, moved on professionally and founded a company in 1994.
NEWS
October 14, 2011 | BY DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
SEPTA has joined forces with District Attorney Seth Williams to root out con artists who fake injuries after bus and train accidents, and serenade them with the old "Baretta" theme song: "Don't do the crime if you can't do the time. " In the battle against fake-injury fraud, SEPTA yesterday unveiled its version of Shock & Awe: eight to 10 digital video cameras on 45 percent of its bus fleet - "You can clearly see every person on the bus," said Frank Cornely, SEPTA's claims director - and 10 to 12 cameras on every Broad Street Line and Market-Frankford Line rail car. By 2013, all buses will be on candid camera.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1998 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
For many reasons, not the least of which are the unsettling murders it depicts, it is difficult to write about The Last Broadcast. Using all the tools at a documentarian's disposal - talking-head interviews, archival footage, computer imaging, newspaper clippings, video enhancements, reenactments and then some - filmmakers Stefan Avalos and Lance Weiler investigate the chillingly strange disappearance and deaths of a crew of goofball public-access TV...
NEWS
May 5, 2005 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sixty movies await me at home, and none of them is named The Beastmaster. Cable has come a ways since the '80s, when that cheesy fable of princes and pelts played on what seemed like a continuous loop. Now I've got Five Easy Pieces, Taxi Driver, and The Last Picture Show cued up for when I've got time to watch. I could catch a Charlie Rose interview with photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson, though I'm more interested in a music video by a Brit rapper called The Streets. I could learn to play Black Sabbath's "Iron Man" on guitar.
LIVING
March 7, 1996 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Now that some VHS and 8mm camcorders can be had for $500 and even less, the joys of home videotaping are available to an ever-widening audience. But the most serious videographers aren't looking for bargains. Instead, they have their eyes on a revolution in video recently wrought by Sony Corp. and Panasonic, the first companies to offer digital video (DV) camcorders. Digital video has the potential to improve the video experience by leaps and bounds, just as the audio CD transformed the music experience.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2004 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is the latest weapon in Comcast Corp.'s effort to keep ahead of the competition: a cable set-top box that includes a TiVo-like digital video recorder. The company is set to announce tomorrow the availability of the devices in the Philadelphia region, home to its corporate headquarters. "They work. They're ready to go," said Michael A. Doyle, president of Comcast Cable's Eastern Division, which stretches from northern Delaware to southern Maine. The recorders are similar to VCRs, in that they allow users to record TV shows.
NEWS
May 30, 1996 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Digital video discs, web-browsing television sets, direct-broadcast satellite systems and a computer that doubles as a home automation control center vied for attention at the Consumer Electronics Show in Orlando, Fla., last weekend. DVD HAS DEFINITE VIDEO DEMAND: The biggest crowds at CES hovered around the Toshiba, Thomson (RCA/GE/ProScan), Panasonic, Pioneer and Samsung booths, where manufacturers were showing off the advantages of DVD - a CD look-alike digital video disc with superb picture and sound quality and special features vastly improved over the VHS tapes we're accustomed to using for viewing movies.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1996 | By Rory J. O'Connor, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As America races toward the 21st century, a feud between the computer and broadcast industries is keeping one piece of technology - the family TV - stuck in the 1940s. Broadcasters say they want the government to set detailed standards that will ensure the reliable operation of a new generation of super-clear digital TVs. But computer makers say the new standards should be more flexible so they can realize a long-held dream of transforming the TV into a more powerful communications tool.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1995 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Following in the footsteps of its all-time bestseller The Lion King, Walt Disney Home Video has chosen Lion's video anniversary date of March 6, 1996, as the sale date for Pocahontas, priced at $26.99. But the animated story of the strong-willed Indian maiden will be no threat to The Lion King's video record of 27 million copies shipped to stores. The box-office total of Pocahontas was $140 million, less than half the colossal take of Lion, and it will probably prove a little less popular as a videotape.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can a video lie? Should it get the last word? Is it always or ever subject to interpretation? Can a million people on YouTube see what they believe to be a Philadelphia police officer striking a woman to the ground and a judge see something else? "This is not a social media contest," Philadelphia Municipal Court Judge Patrick F. Dugan said after finding former Lt. Jonathan Josey not guilty of doing what the viral video seemed to show he had done: strike a woman during last year's Puerto Rican Day festivities.
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NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can a video lie? Should it get the last word? Is it always or ever subject to interpretation? Can a million people on YouTube see what they believe to be a Philadelphia police officer striking a woman to the ground and a judge see something else? "This is not a social media contest," Philadelphia Municipal Court Judge Patrick F. Dugan said after finding former Lt. Jonathan Josey not guilty of doing what the viral video seemed to show he had done: strike a woman during last year's Puerto Rican Day festivities.
NEWS
October 14, 2011 | BY DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
SEPTA has joined forces with District Attorney Seth Williams to root out con artists who fake injuries after bus and train accidents, and serenade them with the old "Baretta" theme song: "Don't do the crime if you can't do the time. " In the battle against fake-injury fraud, SEPTA yesterday unveiled its version of Shock & Awe: eight to 10 digital video cameras on 45 percent of its bus fleet - "You can clearly see every person on the bus," said Frank Cornely, SEPTA's claims director - and 10 to 12 cameras on every Broad Street Line and Market-Frankford Line rail car. By 2013, all buses will be on candid camera.
NEWS
May 5, 2005 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sixty movies await me at home, and none of them is named The Beastmaster. Cable has come a ways since the '80s, when that cheesy fable of princes and pelts played on what seemed like a continuous loop. Now I've got Five Easy Pieces, Taxi Driver, and The Last Picture Show cued up for when I've got time to watch. I could catch a Charlie Rose interview with photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson, though I'm more interested in a music video by a Brit rapper called The Streets. I could learn to play Black Sabbath's "Iron Man" on guitar.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2004 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is the latest weapon in Comcast Corp.'s effort to keep ahead of the competition: a cable set-top box that includes a TiVo-like digital video recorder. The company is set to announce tomorrow the availability of the devices in the Philadelphia region, home to its corporate headquarters. "They work. They're ready to go," said Michael A. Doyle, president of Comcast Cable's Eastern Division, which stretches from northern Delaware to southern Maine. The recorders are similar to VCRs, in that they allow users to record TV shows.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1999 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mike Harris had deep affection for Commodore's Amiga computer. In fact, after graduating from Purdue University in the early 1990s, he relocated to King of Prussia to be near the Commodore headquarters and design circuit boards for the Amiga. To his delight, he found the Amiga all he had hoped for technologically. To his dismay, he found that Commodore, based in West Chester, was badly mismanaged and about to go bust. Out of work and far from his Indiana home, Harris, along with another Amiga stalwart, Gregg Garnick, moved on professionally and founded a company in 1994.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1998 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
For many reasons, not the least of which are the unsettling murders it depicts, it is difficult to write about The Last Broadcast. Using all the tools at a documentarian's disposal - talking-head interviews, archival footage, computer imaging, newspaper clippings, video enhancements, reenactments and then some - filmmakers Stefan Avalos and Lance Weiler investigate the chillingly strange disappearance and deaths of a crew of goofball public-access TV...
BUSINESS
November 7, 1996 | By Rory J. O'Connor, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As America races toward the 21st century, a feud between the computer and broadcast industries is keeping one piece of technology - the family TV - stuck in the 1940s. Broadcasters say they want the government to set detailed standards that will ensure the reliable operation of a new generation of super-clear digital TVs. But computer makers say the new standards should be more flexible so they can realize a long-held dream of transforming the TV into a more powerful communications tool.
NEWS
May 30, 1996 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Digital video discs, web-browsing television sets, direct-broadcast satellite systems and a computer that doubles as a home automation control center vied for attention at the Consumer Electronics Show in Orlando, Fla., last weekend. DVD HAS DEFINITE VIDEO DEMAND: The biggest crowds at CES hovered around the Toshiba, Thomson (RCA/GE/ProScan), Panasonic, Pioneer and Samsung booths, where manufacturers were showing off the advantages of DVD - a CD look-alike digital video disc with superb picture and sound quality and special features vastly improved over the VHS tapes we're accustomed to using for viewing movies.
LIVING
March 7, 1996 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Now that some VHS and 8mm camcorders can be had for $500 and even less, the joys of home videotaping are available to an ever-widening audience. But the most serious videographers aren't looking for bargains. Instead, they have their eyes on a revolution in video recently wrought by Sony Corp. and Panasonic, the first companies to offer digital video (DV) camcorders. Digital video has the potential to improve the video experience by leaps and bounds, just as the audio CD transformed the music experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1995 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Following in the footsteps of its all-time bestseller The Lion King, Walt Disney Home Video has chosen Lion's video anniversary date of March 6, 1996, as the sale date for Pocahontas, priced at $26.99. But the animated story of the strong-willed Indian maiden will be no threat to The Lion King's video record of 27 million copies shipped to stores. The box-office total of Pocahontas was $140 million, less than half the colossal take of Lion, and it will probably prove a little less popular as a videotape.
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