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Dilemma

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NEWS
March 14, 2006
THE CIA HAS given Scooter Libby a "Get out of jail" card. The CIA claims that copying 400 daily briefing papers for the president would take up to nine months. We know that the copying itself would not take this long, even if the briefing papers ran to 20 pages apiece. So, it must be that the effort of blacking out the items that the judge is not authorized to review that causes the problem. Perhaps this problem could be avoided by obtaining a security clearance for the judge. Surely, this shouldn't be a problem for a federal judge who has passed muster with our illustrious and quick-witted GOP Congress.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1986 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
Midlantic Banks, one of New Jersey's largest, said yesterday it was joining the Philadelphia-based MAC teller machine network, creating another competitive dilemma for itself in the Philadelphia market. Midlantic has bought the Heritage Bank branch in Old City, which already has a teller machine that is part of the MAC network. And Midlantic owns not only Heritage, but also is trying to buy Philadelphia-based Continental Bank, whose teller machines belong to the CashStream network, MAC's primary competitor here.
NEWS
May 16, 1995
So you're off to the polls and you suddenly realize you're not sure who you're voting for. In fact, you may not even be sure who's running for what. You're not alone. Except for City Council races in a few districts, this campaign has attracted little interest. In the highest-profile city race - for mayor - both candidates are unopposed in their party's primary. If you're a registered Republican, all candidates are unopposed except in races for city commissioner, Common Pleas Court and state Supreme Court.
NEWS
June 20, 1996 | By Bill Kent
I called my mother first. "Mom, remember that lawn mower that was stolen from my house? The cops found it. " She said, "A miracle!" It seems that on June 1, the Lower Merion police stopped a suspicious-looking character on Haverford Road in the vicinity of my Wynnewood house. He said he was out for a walk. Three hours later, Officer Edward Harrell of Philadelphia's 19th Police District, while walking a beat at Haverford Avenue and City Line, stopped a suspicious character pushing a lawn mower and two electric hedge trimmers.
NEWS
May 30, 1986 | BY GERALD K. MCOSCAR
In some respects, alcoholism is one of the "in" diseases of the '80s, despite the seemingly stricter attitude of society toward alcohol and drug abuse. Ballplayers, movie stars and public figures freely discuss their addictions and recoveries in the press and on television. The public, however, is not quite ready to view the alcoholic with the same compassion as, for instance, it may view a heart patient or diabetic. This lack of general public acceptance and understanding stems in large part from the troubling notion that, yes, the alcoholic might be suffering from an illness, but is not the suffering self-inflicted?
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | By Nate House
There are too many deer in Pennypack Park. This we already know and seem to agree on. The question now is how to get rid of some of them before they turn the land into a parking lot for deer. Shooting Bambi and friends is one option that has been met with more protests and political action than the Lex Street massacre. Several animal- rights activists even entered Fairmount Park last year during times whenpark officials had scheduledsharpshooters to begin trimming the herd.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
WE'VE PUT men on the moon but have yet to come up with a perfect corn de-kerneler, one that cleans a freshly shucked cob without shooting kernels all over the kitchen. Sure, there are at least a dozen clever implements (variously called strippers, kernelers, zippers, cutters and peelers) designed to do the job. None seem to work as well as a sharp knife and steady hand. And that has its own problems: Holding that cob upright and still while cutting off the kernels can be a challenge.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | BY MIKE ROYKO
My friend George the Knee-Jerk Liberal was highly agitated. I could tell because both knees were twitching and he was gulping, rather than sipping, his white wine. "I have such a political and social dilemma," he said. You usually do. What is it this time? "The nomination of Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court. I had dinner with friends last night - an excellent little Thai place, by the way - and I found myself . . . " He paused and seemed to choke on the words.
NEWS
November 12, 1986 | By H. G. Bissinger, Inquirer Staff Writer
He began as a rough-and-tumble South Philadelphia street fighter, where he gained his respect by never punching anyone in the back. He is still tough, still a little bit relentless. But now Bill Batoff is the money man of Democratic politics, where he gains his respect by raising millions. He now chats with Ted Kennedy ("He called last week to wish my son a happy birthday") and is on a friendly basis with Jimmy Carter ("Only in America," was all his wife could say after they found themselves seated at a small dinner table between the President and Anwar Sadat one night in Washington)
NEWS
May 9, 2002
I COULDN'T AGREE with more with Michael Smerconish's May 2 column. The city is in a seemingly irreversible decline. I'm 27. My wife and I are doing well financially but face a huge dilemma. We want to live in the city, but can't afford high-priced homes in trendy Center City. We fear that buying a home in South Philly or another traditional neighborhood will only be a losing proposition because the neighborhoods tend to change quickly. I hope we will not have to flee to Jersey and live in some cookie-cutter "townhouse.
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SPORTS
March 21, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 76ers did a horrible thing Wednesday night - they defeated the Detroit Pistons. Why horrible? Because the Sixers are supposed to have tanking fever. Yet, they have a dilemma. General manager Sam Hinkie purposely constructed a bad team with the hope of securing one of the top picks in June's NBA draft. However, his players have refused to adopt a losing mentality, and the Sixers have won three of their past six games. Now their schedule really isn't conductive to losing.
SPORTS
March 5, 2015 | BY SAM DONNELLON, Daily News Staff Writer donnels@phillynews.com
RON HEXTALL said he wouldn't scrap the Flyers' young talent at the trade deadline and he was true to his word. That doesn't mean, however, that all of them will be around when the prospects already in the system and those who will join them via the draft develop into NHL players. In fact, one of the determinations facing Hextall this summer is who qualifies as young and who doesn't. Who still has unrealized potential and who has done as much as they're going to do in an NHL uniform?
SPORTS
February 23, 2015 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
INDIANAPOLIS - The convergence of the Eagles' talent evaluation and character evaluation could be put to the test with Washington cornerback Marcus Peters, who fits many of the prerequisites for a top prospect - except for the fact that he was dismissed from his team last season. "They want to know the character," Peters said of NFL teams. "Am I a hothead? Which is false. I made some immature decisions . . . and I learn from them and I grow as a man. " Peters, who is 6 feet and 197 pounds with 31½-inch arms, is among an impressive group of cornerbacks in the first round who fit the prototype that the Eagles seek.
NEWS
February 23, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
All the potential candidates for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination are on record favoring the traditional definition of marriage: one man, one woman. So far, though, most are not talking much about it. Same-sex marriage has become a much more complicated issue for Republicans since 2004, when master strategist Karl Rove helped put gay-marriage bans on the ballot in key states to boost the party's base turnout and help reelect President George W. Bush. Voters, including many Republicans, have become more open to allowing gay men and lesbians to wed, and the right is now recognized in 36 states.
SPORTS
January 2, 2015 | By PAUL DOMOWITCH, Daily News Sports Columnist
OVER THE COURSE of the next few weeks, Chip Kelly will look at every pass Nick Foles threw this season and last. He will break down his mechanics and his decision-making and his accuracy and his pocket presence and everything else that game film can tell a coach about a quarterback. At some point, he will examine the evidence and come to a conclusion as to whether he thinks the Eagles can one day win a Super Bowl with Foles as their quarterback. There's no way to know that for sure, of course.
SPORTS
December 16, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Whatever he decides, whenever he decides, Chip Kelly will shrug when he makes the announcement. He will either say, "Nick Foles is our starter. Mark Sanchez is our backup. The starter is ready to go, so he's back in there. " Or he will say, "We feel like Mark has played well enough to keep the job right now. Having Nick ready if something goes wrong is a great situation to be in. " And then he will shrug, as if saying anything other than that would be silly. We'll find out soon enough, maybe as soon as Monday, although even if Foles is cleared to return to practice this week, Kelly would be content to let that drama play out for a few more days.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When Theatre Exile opens playwright Lucas Hnath's darkly topical Red Speedo on Wednesday at its Studio X headquarters, it's not the smell of the greasepaint and the roar of the crowd that will be most noticeable. Rather, the pungent scent of chlorine and the splashing of pool water will predominate. Set designer Colin McIlvaine has created a locker-filled training area complete with the edge of an Olympic-sized pool (18 inches deep; no swimming) for Hnath's caustic tale of doping and the moral dilemmas at its heart: How far would you go for the ultimate win?
SPORTS
October 10, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
BOSTON - Chris Pronger is rapidly approaching the 3-year anniversary of his last NHL game, on Nov. 19, 2011. He has not put on full hockey equipment in 1,055 days. There is no question, not even in his mind, that his playing days are over - his illustrious career cut short by concussion-like symptoms. Yet, Pronger remains on the Flyers' roster. His contract does not expire until June 30, 2017. Since suffering his eye injury on Oct. 24, 2011, when he took a high-stick from Toronto's Mikhail Grabovski, which contributes to his symptoms, he has continued to collect the $26,950,000 remaining on his contract.
SPORTS
September 27, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn State's three-headed tailback system is a luxury for coach James Franklin but a problem of sorts for the participants. Franklin loves the competition generated among the backs - seniors Bill Belton and Zach Zwinak and sophomore Akeel Lynch - because it keeps everyone sharp on the practice field and on the sideline watching the game. The trio has done so well through the Nittany Lions' preseason camp and nearly a month of the regular season that Franklin still can't find one tailback who has emerged above the other two. "I don't think one guy has really separated himself over the others," Franklin said.
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