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Dilworth

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BUSINESS
March 12, 1993 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo (D., Phila.) is switching law firms - leaving Astor, Weiss & Newman to join Dilworth, Paxson, Kalish & Kauffman. Joseph H. Jacovini, vice chairman of the Dilworth firm, said yesterday that Fumo would become an affiliate of the firm, with the title "of counsel," on April 1. Fumo, chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, has been at Astor, Weiss & Newman since the early 1970s. In a prepared statement, Fumo said he was changing law firms in keeping with his "future career goals.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1991 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than six partners at Dilworth, Paxson, Kalish & Kauffman will lose their jobs and others will take pay cuts following a decision by Bruce W. Kauffman to remain at the firm. Joe Jacovini, a senior Dilworth partner, called Kauffman's decision not to join a competing firm - taking a host of Dilworth partners with him - a "chance convergence of events" unrelated to the pay cuts and partner departures. Kauffman termed his decision to remain as Dilworth's chairman a "personal sacrifice" made to insure the firm's viability.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1995 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dilworth, Paxson, Kalish & Kauffman yesterday announced that it had acquired an 11-lawyer Cherry Hill firm, its first major expansion since a shake-up shrank the firm in 1991. Jubanyik, Varbalow, Tedesco, Shaw & Shaffer joined the Center City firm this week, expanding its regional base and strengthening its banking and real estate practices. "State lines are blurring," said Dilworth's vice chairman, Joseph H. Jacovini. "Our practice is, naturally, expanding into New Jersey, and their practice was expanding into Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1987 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
John F. Stoviak has left the law firm of Dilworth, Paxson, Kalish & Kauffman to become a partner in another Philadelphia law shop, and some say his departure is an example of an increased willingness by lawyers to move from job to job rather than staying put. The 36-year-old Stoviak left Dilworth after 11 years, including five years as a partner and a member of the executive committee, to take a partnership at Saul, Ewing, Remick & Saul,...
NEWS
May 5, 1988 | By MARK McDONALD, Daily News Staff Writer
SEPTA has been billed $141,415 in attorney fees by a firm it hired in January to conduct an in-house investigation. The fees from Dilworth, Paxson, Kalish & Kauffman are for work through March. James Kilcur, SEPTA's acting general manager, predicted the April bill would be the smallest to date. He said SEPTA is reviewing all of the charges. The Dilworth firm, whose charges are $55,213 for January, $56,202 for February and $30,000 for March, also is guiding the troubled transit authority through a maze of state and federal investigations.
NEWS
May 3, 1989 | By Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
A New Jersey judge has ruled against a former member of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court and his law firm in an unusual lawsuit involving billionaire developer Donald Trump and a pair of Atlantic City casinos. The ruling, which took effect last week, states that Bruce Kauffman, who sat on Pennsylvania's high court from 1980 to 1982, and his law firm, Dilworth, Paxson, Kalish & Kauffman, acted improperly when it sued one of its own clients, the Trump Plaza Hotel, on behalf of a new client, the Sands Hotel Casino.
NEWS
September 17, 1987 | By Frederick Cusick and James Asher, Inquirer Staff Writers (Inquirer staff writer Francis M. Lordan contributed to this article.)
At the request of Gov. Casey, the Delaware River Port Authority board yesterday hired longtime Casey supporter John M. Elliott as its new attorney. Elliott replaces city Republican Party Chairman D. Donald Jamieson as one of the authority's regular outside legal counsels. Jamieson was dropped yesterday. The action of the authority, which is jointly controlled by Pennsylvania and New Jersey, reflected the GOP's loss of the Pennsylvania governorship last November. New Jersey and Pennsylvania are each entitled to hire outside legal counsel for the authority.
NEWS
March 6, 1988 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
When Michael Smerconish, the kid - and I mean kid - who called some of the shots in Frank Rizzo's mayoral campaign last year, opened his title insurance business in Doylestown a few weeks ago, he asked Frank Rizzo to cut the ribbon at the dedication ceremonies. "Aw, Michael, that's not for me," the Bambino said. "Please, mayor, please come," Michael Smerconish said. "If you come we'll get media coverage. You have to come, mayor. " So Frank Rizzo came and, naturally, the opening of Michael Smerconish's business got a spread in the Doylestown Intelligencer.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1991 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
Almost as soon as Bruce Kauffman appeased his bankers by staying on as chairman of Dilworth, Paxson, Kalish & Kauffman, his law firm braced for another key departure. One of the partners that Kauffman was negotiating only a month ago to take with him to Wolf, Block, Schorr & Solis-Cohen is apparently negotiating his own deal to go elsewhere. Former City Controller Thomas A. Leonard, who is a key Dilworth player, is talking with the Pittsburgh-based law firm Kirkpatrick & Lockhart about a job for himself and some other Dilworth associates.
NEWS
February 11, 2011 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
For much of the last half-century, anyone who passed through Philadelphia's civic heart had to traverse at least one of three inhospitable islands encircling City Hall. The trio of granite-paved plazas - Dilworth, Municipal Services and JFK - were an unfortunate legacy of the 1960s, a time when such grandiose spaces were built as pedestals for buildings, rather than parks for people. Neglected for decades, at least partly out of disdain for their harsh designs, the spaces have now become a priority with city officials.
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NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
While it seemed hardly the weather Wednesday to be thinking of winter sports, ice skating is coming in just weeks to Dilworth Park, the city's revamped public square west of City Hall. The new Rothman Institute Ice Rink will open there Nov. 14, said Paul R. Levy, president and chief executive officer of the Center City District. The rink will be open seven days a week through Feb. 22. It will be managed by Rink Management Services Corp. (RMSC) of Mechanicsville, Va., which was selected after competitively bidding for the contract, Levy said.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
They've reconstructed the space in front of Philadelphia's palatial City Hall, furnished it with a cafe, a high-tech spray fountain and movable chairs, and rebranded it Dilworth Park . But the vast granite prairie is still very much a plaza , with all the weaknesses the word implies. There is no doubt that this important civic space, once a smelly, run-down municipal embarrassment in the heart of Philadelphia, has been greatly improved by the Center City District's Paul Levy, who marshaled a dream team of Philadelphia's most renowned designers and engineers.
NEWS
September 6, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richardson Dilworth was a Pittsburgh-born lawyer who adopted Philadelphia as his home and fought as a Marine in World War I, earning a Purple Heart. He reenlisted at age 43 to fight in World War II and was awarded the Silver Star for bravery at Guadalcanal. That alone would be a remarkable life, but Dilworth had political aspirations. He and reform ally Joseph S. Clark ended nearly seven decades of Republican rule when they were elected district attorney and mayor, respectively, in 1951.
NEWS
September 6, 2014 | By Chris Hepp and Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writers
  By a most exacting measure, the newly opened Dilworth Park already seems a success: hundreds of Philadelphians endured more than an hour of speeches under a blazing sun Thursday and still wanted to stay and kick the tires. "Gorgeous," was the assessment of Rochelle Schwartz, 66, of Center City, after first wandering the park and then making her way underground to the gleaming new transit concourse. And so it is. What previously was an ill-conceived, uninviting melange of staircases, a sunken courtyard, stone walls and an empty granite field on the west side of City Hall has been transformed into a beckoning public realm with fountains, a cafe, ice skating in winter and swooping glass "headhouses" that serve as grand entrances to the subways below.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THE WAIT is over. And, for Dilworth Plaza, the second time's a charm. The renovation of the gateway to Penn Center was designed to forge a connection to the city's central business district west of City Hall. Renamed Dilworth Park, the west apron of City Hall looks nothing like the version opened in 1977 - which soon became notorious for its drab concrete slabs that doubled as beds for the homeless and dark subway corridors reeking of urine. Planned for months, yesterday's ribbon-cutting was a lovefest of who's who at the local, state and federal levels, as well as the minds and bodies that brought the project to fruition.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writerdehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
Few can resist the hullabaloo and fanfare of a bright new playground opening, and why should they? Yesterday's opening day for Dilworth Park was accented with fireworks and illuminations, musical ensembles and dancers, and bunny hoppers through the ground-level geysers outside City Hall. But beyond all the pomp and circumstance, The People Paper surveyed several passersby to see if they knew why the park is called Dilworth. Below are a few gems that turned up.   "Actually, I don't know why it's named Dilworth because I'm originally from Miami.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
OK, SO IT'S $5 million over budget and about five months late, but the completion of Dilworth Plaza on City Hall's western front is only a few weeks away, officials said yesterday. Imagine bubbling urban fountains, vast green spaces, live music and an outdoor cafe that serves food by day and alcohol after 5 p.m. It's all coming to fruition in the form of Dilworth Park , the city's lively new centerpiece scheduled for a ribbon-cutting at 11 a.m. Sept. 4. For more than two years, the once-drab, concrete underground maze known as Dilworth Plaza has been getting a face-lift, with fewer stairs and with elevators to ease foot traffic.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Penn is finally getting his Centre Square back. Or, at least how he might have envisioned it 400 years on. In this reimagining, there will be ice skating, programmable fountains, an upscale cafe, well-lit access to subways, and open space - lovely, inviting open space, all on the doorstep of City Hall. "We envision this as the center of our city, the center of our neighborhoods," said Paul Levy, chief executive of the Center City District (CCD). On Sept. 4, what was Dilworth Plaza, an off-putting, at times even threatening, hardscaped remnant of the well-intentioned but often misguided 1970s, is to reopen as Dilworth Park, a softer, greener, refurbished front porch for Philadelphia's civic hub. Three days of music, feasting, and general merriment will follow as the city looks to introduce the $55 million remake to the public.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The plan for Dilworth Plaza - to be renamed Dilworth Park - is really two projects rolled into one. At street level, the goal is to create a welcoming civic space where office workers, tourists, and residents can relax in the shadow of City Hall. Down below will be a big, new waiting room for subway riders. Some notable features: To enhance views of City Hall's lavish Beaux-Arts facade, the park was kept uncluttered and largely flat in the center. Like a good neoclassical building, it is symmetrical, with a grass lawn at the north end and a flat water feature at the south.
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