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BUSINESS
March 12, 1993 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo (D., Phila.) is switching law firms - leaving Astor, Weiss & Newman to join Dilworth, Paxson, Kalish & Kauffman. Joseph H. Jacovini, vice chairman of the Dilworth firm, said yesterday that Fumo would become an affiliate of the firm, with the title "of counsel," on April 1. Fumo, chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, has been at Astor, Weiss & Newman since the early 1970s. In a prepared statement, Fumo said he was changing law firms in keeping with his "future career goals.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1991 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than six partners at Dilworth, Paxson, Kalish & Kauffman will lose their jobs and others will take pay cuts following a decision by Bruce W. Kauffman to remain at the firm. Joe Jacovini, a senior Dilworth partner, called Kauffman's decision not to join a competing firm - taking a host of Dilworth partners with him - a "chance convergence of events" unrelated to the pay cuts and partner departures. Kauffman termed his decision to remain as Dilworth's chairman a "personal sacrifice" made to insure the firm's viability.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1995 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dilworth, Paxson, Kalish & Kauffman yesterday announced that it had acquired an 11-lawyer Cherry Hill firm, its first major expansion since a shake-up shrank the firm in 1991. Jubanyik, Varbalow, Tedesco, Shaw & Shaffer joined the Center City firm this week, expanding its regional base and strengthening its banking and real estate practices. "State lines are blurring," said Dilworth's vice chairman, Joseph H. Jacovini. "Our practice is, naturally, expanding into New Jersey, and their practice was expanding into Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1987 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
John F. Stoviak has left the law firm of Dilworth, Paxson, Kalish & Kauffman to become a partner in another Philadelphia law shop, and some say his departure is an example of an increased willingness by lawyers to move from job to job rather than staying put. The 36-year-old Stoviak left Dilworth after 11 years, including five years as a partner and a member of the executive committee, to take a partnership at Saul, Ewing, Remick & Saul,...
NEWS
August 29, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
George L. Bernstein, 84, formerly of Elkins Park, a business executive who led the expansion of the Philadelphia accounting firm Laventhol & Horwath in the 1980s, died Sunday, Aug. 21, of congestive heart failure at Rydal Park. Mr. Bernstein lived in Elkins Park and Center City before moving to Rydal Park, a retirement community in Jenkintown. Born in Philadelphia, he attended Central High School and earned degrees from the Wharton School and the Law School of the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
May 5, 1988 | By MARK McDONALD, Daily News Staff Writer
SEPTA has been billed $141,415 in attorney fees by a firm it hired in January to conduct an in-house investigation. The fees from Dilworth, Paxson, Kalish & Kauffman are for work through March. James Kilcur, SEPTA's acting general manager, predicted the April bill would be the smallest to date. He said SEPTA is reviewing all of the charges. The Dilworth firm, whose charges are $55,213 for January, $56,202 for February and $30,000 for March, also is guiding the troubled transit authority through a maze of state and federal investigations.
NEWS
May 3, 1989 | By Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
A New Jersey judge has ruled against a former member of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court and his law firm in an unusual lawsuit involving billionaire developer Donald Trump and a pair of Atlantic City casinos. The ruling, which took effect last week, states that Bruce Kauffman, who sat on Pennsylvania's high court from 1980 to 1982, and his law firm, Dilworth, Paxson, Kalish & Kauffman, acted improperly when it sued one of its own clients, the Trump Plaza Hotel, on behalf of a new client, the Sands Hotel Casino.
NEWS
September 17, 1987 | By Frederick Cusick and James Asher, Inquirer Staff Writers (Inquirer staff writer Francis M. Lordan contributed to this article.)
At the request of Gov. Casey, the Delaware River Port Authority board yesterday hired longtime Casey supporter John M. Elliott as its new attorney. Elliott replaces city Republican Party Chairman D. Donald Jamieson as one of the authority's regular outside legal counsels. Jamieson was dropped yesterday. The action of the authority, which is jointly controlled by Pennsylvania and New Jersey, reflected the GOP's loss of the Pennsylvania governorship last November. New Jersey and Pennsylvania are each entitled to hire outside legal counsel for the authority.
NEWS
March 6, 1988 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
When Michael Smerconish, the kid - and I mean kid - who called some of the shots in Frank Rizzo's mayoral campaign last year, opened his title insurance business in Doylestown a few weeks ago, he asked Frank Rizzo to cut the ribbon at the dedication ceremonies. "Aw, Michael, that's not for me," the Bambino said. "Please, mayor, please come," Michael Smerconish said. "If you come we'll get media coverage. You have to come, mayor. " So Frank Rizzo came and, naturally, the opening of Michael Smerconish's business got a spread in the Doylestown Intelligencer.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1991 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
Almost as soon as Bruce Kauffman appeased his bankers by staying on as chairman of Dilworth, Paxson, Kalish & Kauffman, his law firm braced for another key departure. One of the partners that Kauffman was negotiating only a month ago to take with him to Wolf, Block, Schorr & Solis-Cohen is apparently negotiating his own deal to go elsewhere. Former City Controller Thomas A. Leonard, who is a key Dilworth player, is talking with the Pittsburgh-based law firm Kirkpatrick & Lockhart about a job for himself and some other Dilworth associates.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 15, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Chief Inspector Joseph Sullivan, who headed police response to the papal visit and the Democratic National Convention, was honored Tuesday for his 33 years in the Philadelphia Police Department. Sullivan was one of three recipients of the Richardson Dilworth Awards, which recognize full-time, executive-branch employees. Sullivan's Distinguished Public Service honor comes with a $5,000 stipend from Dilworth Paxson LLP and Independence Blue Cross. An additional award for Innovation in Government was given to Laura Cassidy, sustainability manager for the Philadelphia Department of Prisons; an award for customer service went to Joanne Dahme, general manager for public affairs at the Philadelphia Water Department.
NEWS
August 29, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
George L. Bernstein, 84, formerly of Elkins Park, a business executive who led the expansion of the Philadelphia accounting firm Laventhol & Horwath in the 1980s, died Sunday, Aug. 21, of congestive heart failure at Rydal Park. Mr. Bernstein lived in Elkins Park and Center City before moving to Rydal Park, a retirement community in Jenkintown. Born in Philadelphia, he attended Central High School and earned degrees from the Wharton School and the Law School of the University of Pennsylvania.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
You only have to spend a few minutes in Dilworth Park to see what a people magnet it has become since the Center City District completed a dramatic, $55 million makeover two years ago. Besides regular attractions, like the cafe and sparkling fountain, there is something special going on 186 days a year - that's every other day - ranging from concerts and farmers' markets to bocce tournaments and Lupus Awareness booths. Everything, that is, except demonstrations. You read that right.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2016 | Inga Saffron, INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
There is a great work of art in the center of Dilworth Park. Unfortunately, you can't see it right now. Called Pulse , the site-specific piece by Janet Echelman was commissioned in 2009, just as a major reconstruction was being planned for the City Hall plaza. Her idea was to use colored light and mist to trace the path of the subways as they rumbled under the park's surface. Ephemeral and magical, the piece was meant to be the capstone of the plaza's $55 million overhaul, a civic gesture that could be as captivating as the famous sculptures of Chicago's Millennium Park . But nearly 18 months after Dilworth reopened under the auspices of a private manager, the Center City District, Pulse is only half-finished.
NEWS
November 21, 2015 | By Dani Blum, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a month beginning this weekend, Dilworth Park will spotlight local artists and their unique creations in a new holiday-theme festival and market. The Made in Philadelphia Holiday Market at Dilworth Park will have 30 vendors, including purveyors of hand-popped kettle corn and "potato tornados," artisan woodcrafters, and makers of eco-friendly neck warmers. It will open Saturday and stay until Dec. 27. It will be closed Christmas. While it is there, the park will be filled with decorated tents stocked with arts and crafts, jewelry, accessories, and food and drink booths, all from the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
November 15, 2015 | By Jack Tomczuk, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sophia Katz, 10, was one of the first skaters on the ice Friday when the Rothman Institute Ice Rink opened at Dilworth Park. With the sun shining and the temperature hovering around 60 degrees on the west side of City Hall, Katz worried the weather could affect the ice. "It was really warm," said Katz, a member of Philadelphia Symmetry, the synchronized skating team that began the opening celebration. "I felt like the ice was going to melt. " A heated cabin, constructed next to the rink to provide warmth, food, and drink, didn't see much use on its first afternoon.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
While it seemed hardly the weather Wednesday to be thinking of winter sports, ice skating is coming in just weeks to Dilworth Park, the city's revamped public square west of City Hall. The new Rothman Institute Ice Rink will open there Nov. 14, said Paul R. Levy, president and chief executive officer of the Center City District. The rink will be open seven days a week through Feb. 22. It will be managed by Rink Management Services Corp. (RMSC) of Mechanicsville, Va., which was selected after competitively bidding for the contract, Levy said.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
They've reconstructed the space in front of Philadelphia's palatial City Hall, furnished it with a cafe, a high-tech spray fountain and movable chairs, and rebranded it Dilworth Park . But the vast granite prairie is still very much a plaza , with all the weaknesses the word implies. There is no doubt that this important civic space, once a smelly, run-down municipal embarrassment in the heart of Philadelphia, has been greatly improved by the Center City District's Paul Levy, who marshaled a dream team of Philadelphia's most renowned designers and engineers.
NEWS
September 6, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richardson Dilworth was a Pittsburgh-born lawyer who adopted Philadelphia as his home and fought as a Marine in World War I, earning a Purple Heart. He reenlisted at age 43 to fight in World War II and was awarded the Silver Star for bravery at Guadalcanal. That alone would be a remarkable life, but Dilworth had political aspirations. He and reform ally Joseph S. Clark ended nearly seven decades of Republican rule when they were elected district attorney and mayor, respectively, in 1951.
NEWS
September 6, 2014 | By Chris Hepp and Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writers
  By a most exacting measure, the newly opened Dilworth Park already seems a success: hundreds of Philadelphians endured more than an hour of speeches under a blazing sun Thursday and still wanted to stay and kick the tires. "Gorgeous," was the assessment of Rochelle Schwartz, 66, of Center City, after first wandering the park and then making her way underground to the gleaming new transit concourse. And so it is. What previously was an ill-conceived, uninviting melange of staircases, a sunken courtyard, stone walls and an empty granite field on the west side of City Hall has been transformed into a beckoning public realm with fountains, a cafe, ice skating in winter and swooping glass "headhouses" that serve as grand entrances to the subways below.
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