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NEWS
January 13, 1998 | Inquirer photographs by Michael S. Wirtz
Diner on the Square, a Center City mainstay that kept night owls and early risers alike stoked on hamburgers, blueberry pancakes and other diner delicacies, closed Jan. 4. But die-hard fans and those looking for a deal on restaurant equipment will get their chance at 11 a.m. tomorrow, when the contents of the Rittenhouse Square restaurant go up for auction. The space at 19th and Spruce will eventually hold a Marathon Grill.
NEWS
July 24, 1988 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
Sara Jean Knox Shannon, 66, who with her husband operated the landmark Meri-ney Diner in Rosemont, died July 16 in the Delaware County Memorial Hospital after suffering with cancer the last 10 months. Mrs. Shannon was born in Bryn Mawr. She attended Radnor High School and graduated in 1940. From 1939 to 1942, she was a telephone operator for Bell Telephone Co. in Philadelphia. She worked for the Pennsylvania Railroad Co. from 1942 to 1945 as a teletype operator, a job in which she occasionally directed trains.
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | By Cynthia Mayer, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's been a year since headlines in Delaware County trumpeted news of the "Doomsday Cult," a group of followers of the Church of Our First Love in Drexel Hill. Most of the approximately 30 followers of the home-style church have moved on, either to South Carolina or western Pennsylvania, according to relatives and township officials. But a few minor annoyances - at least in Ridley Township's eyes - are still around. One cropped up again this month, when neighbors complained that two men were living in the Cedars Restaurant in Holmes, which is partly owned by a member of the church.
NEWS
May 3, 1992 | By John V. R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Although it may not look it from the outside, in truth the Valley Forge Restaurant & Bar is essentially an upscale, classy-looking diner. Marking its 30th year, the diner-restaurant has an unusual barn-like roof and greenhouse-like windows that give the appearance of an excursion train. The main dining area is paneled in attractive grooved oak, decorated with watercolors of country scenes. Big, recessed picture windows are filled with giant planters stuffed with prayer plants, lilies, spider plants and other greenery.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"Tin Men," a comedy starring Richard Dreyfuss, Danny DeVito, Barbara Hershey, Jackie Gayle & John Mahoney. Written & directed by Barry Levinson. Running time: 108 minutes. A Touchstone release. At area theaters. Like "American Graffiti," "Stand By Me," "The Flamingo Kid," "The Right Stuff," Barry Levinson's own "Diner" and several other recent movies, "Tin Men," Levinson's latest film, is set in the early 1960s. It's easy to see why filmmakers are drawn to this period. It's a dividing line, a cusp: Before it lies Ike's repressive '50s, and after it lies . . . something else.
NEWS
November 23, 1986 | By Steve Twomey, Inquirer Staff Writer
At first, the people of the city's 17th arrondissement, or district, didn't think the new place on the Rue Pouchet was a place to eat. Actually, they thought that it looked more like a hair salon. But an American instantly recognizes the Rival Coffee Shop for what it is supposed to be: a diner, with 10 stools around a counter, booths, old Coca- Cola signs, '50s music on the speakers and coffee - American coffee - perking all the time. Claude Benouaich, 25, and Thierry Monnassier, 26, opened up not long ago because they had fallen in love with diners during six months or so in the United States and thought the French were ready for one. A lot of other people have thought lately that the French, those kings of cuisine, are ready for American food, because a small army of vintage, non- fast-food establishments have popped up all over the city, in many cases to standing room only.
NEWS
December 14, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
August Wilson died last year after completing his cycle of 10 plays, each representing a decade in the 20th-century African American experience. Signature Theatre, whose mission is to focus each season on one playwright's work, is celebrating Wilson by presenting three of the less-frequently seen plays in the cycle. This new production of Two Trains Running, already extended twice, is solid and satisfying. It's 1969. In a diner in the same Pittsburgh neighborhood where most of Wilson's plays take place, the same people meet and drink coffee and talk every day. Over the course of 3 1/4 hours we get to know their habits and their preoccupations almost as well as they do; the measured pace of Lou Bellamy's direction establishes a profound level of realism that requires the kind of ensemble acting that this superb cast provides.
NEWS
January 15, 1998 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The Diner on the Square is history, following a feeding frenzy by buyers so hungry for bargains that they gobbled up all the restaurant's equipment. "It's a shame the auction had to happen, the result of high taxes and high rents that burden a small business," sighed disappointed owner Peter Bruhn. The economic facts of life in the 1990s forced Bruhn earlier this month to close the tile-and-chrome eatery he opened in 1986. But his voice was the only one tinged with disappointment in the shuttered diner yesterday as buyers looking for deals made bids on 118 assorted lots of items in 100 minutes flat.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Country Squire Diner Restaurant, closed down by a fire Monday morning, served more than the usual assortment of family-style food. The restaurant also was renowned for its camaraderie among customers and employees. The cozy diner served luncheons for social clubs, breakfast for families after Sunday church services, rehearsal dinners for bridal parties and birthday parties for youngsters and had moderate prices for senior citizens. The diner has been operated by Gus Costalas and his family, who were at the site cleaning up after the fire and waiting for the insurance adjuster.
NEWS
June 27, 1986 | By Edgar Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
The world headquarters building of the Institute for Advanced Creative Thoughts & Stuff (IFACTS) was moved yesterday. Henceforth, it will be IFACTS- on-the-Delaware. The "world-headquarters building" is a classic old diner that for more than a year was at the southwest corner of 36th and Market Streets. All gussied up by Philadelphia artist Phil Simkin, in whose whimsy IFACTS exists, the diner was one of the attractions of a project of the University City Science Center (UCSC) to illustrate the link between art and science.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 28, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
After emptying the salt and pepper shakers, Anna Diamantis walked to each plum-colored booth in the main room of the Freeway Diner in Deptford on Tuesday and unloaded the sugar jars. A son-in-law had claimed the custom silver wall clock, whose numbers are replaced with the eatery's name. Other area restaurants had agreed to buy the surplus food on hand. Longtime customer Lily Corbett, a retired bank manager, stopped in to see the restaurant owners and left with crab cakes for her husband, Charlie.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
CONCORD, N.H. - Gov. Christie resumed his courting of New Hampshire voters last week with a packed two-day pass through the early presidential primary state that included stops at a diner and bar, a town-hall-style meeting, and a pledge to return. At a Republican dinner Thursday in Keene, he tried to connect with stories about his parents and "why I am the way I am. " At a diner Friday in Amherst, Christie, accompanied by wife Mary Pat, told patrons that "coming up to New Hampshire to engage with all of you is invigorating.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
With a counter and seven booths stuffed into a corner of a parking garage, Little Pete's dimensions live up to its name as much as its compact cofounder and namesake, Peter Koutroubas. Measured, however, by the reaction to reports of its imminent demise, Little Pete's is surprisingly big. After Councilman Kenyatta Johnson introduced legislation last fall to clear the way for a boutique hotel on Little Pete's Center City corner - presaging the all-night diner's doom - the blog Philebrity started a #SaveLittlePetes campaign on Twitter while panicked customers peppered Koutroubas' brother John with questions.
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Little Pete's has not yet fallen to the wrecking ball, but mourning has begun for one of Philadelphia's last all-night diners, a throwback that has said, "No thank you," to the fancy-food revolution of a downtown gone upscale. The rich, the poor, the young, the old; the man with the eye patch, the waitress who still smokes Marlboro Reds, the executive who knows the overnight waitress by name. All lament the imminent demise of a go-to greasy spoon that has served burgers 24 hours a day for 36 years beneath a concrete parking garage at 17th and Chancellor Streets.
NEWS
November 11, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
LIKE MANY immigrants, Pete Dovas looked upon America as the promised land. Pete grew up in the small farming town of Karitsa, Greece, with no running water or electricity. After compulsory service in the Greek army, Pete decided to take the chance. "He took a huge risk and leap of faith to come to America to live the American Dream," said his son, Vasilios "Bill" Dovas. "And he did live it. " Panagiotis Vasilios "Pete" Dovas, co-owner and manager of the Penrose Diner, the popular South Philadelphia landmark, died Wednesday of heart failure.
NEWS
November 10, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
EAST PASSYUNK Avenue has transformed itself from a street of struggling mom-and-pop stores to a restaurant-rich Foodie Field of Dreams. But man cannot live by bread, or wraps, alone. Even the coolest neighborhood with the hottest Italian, Mexican, French-Canadian and Japanese soul food needs food for the soul, the kind that stimulates the brain instead of the tongue. Housed a couple of blocks off the main drag in a former taxi garage on 13th Street near Reed, Theatre Exile is the hungry heart of East Passyunk.
NEWS
July 21, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
MARION, Iowa - Inside a diner crammed with television cameras and national reporters in this town just outside Cedar Rapids, Joe Mallie gave a glimpse of the challenge Gov. Christie could confront in wooing conservative voters to elevate him to the White House. Awaiting Christie's entrance Thursday at MJ's Restaurant, a camera around his neck, Mallie praised the governor's charisma. "People pay attention when he talks, and they feel like listening," he said. "You feel you understand when he's talking.
NEWS
June 4, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ray and Millie Snap often sat in the same window booth at Crystal Lake Diner, she ordering eggs over light with toast, he ordering the salad with carrots and radishes - the best salad around, he called it - from the waitresses they knew by first name. On Monday, the wife and husband pulled up to the diner in Haddon Township again, but this time with sadness. A bulldozer sat in the back, where a partially collapsed roof revealed the damaging aftermath of a two-alarm blaze that erupted around 11 p.m. Sunday after employees had left.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
MAYBE THEY SHOULD call it a "Democratic disunity" meeting? York County businessman Tom Wolf will sit down for breakfast at the Oregon Diner in South Philly tomorrow morning with the three candidates he easily defeated in Tuesday's Democratic primary election for governor. U.S. Rep. Bob Brady, the city's Democratic Party chairman, asked the candidates last week to attend a "unity" meeting after the primary. They all agreed. But former Gov. Ed Rendell, who is also attending, predicts no "kissing and hugging" after the nasty primary campaign among Wolf, U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz and state Treasurer Rob McCord.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
YOU WORK in the restaurant business long enough and you're bound to get a feel for when something just ain't right with a group of customers. Maybe they get a little antsy after ordering a big meal. Maybe their eyes keep darting between the wait staff and the exit as they contemplate making a run for it. The party of four who sat down for a late meal at the Tiffany Diner in Northeast Philly on Sunday night didn't show any of those obvious tells. But when it came time to pay, the group - two men and two women - allegedly dropped a phony $50 bill and bolted, Sinan Gecer, the diner's manager, said yesterday.
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