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NEWS
November 5, 1989 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
While newer hotel restaurants generally emphasize quality of cuisine, the Haymarket dining room in the Mount Laurel Hilton sticks to the tried and true. Unfortunately, the old ways no longer seem so good. The unexciting decor in this brightly lighted restaurant seems little changed over the years, while the cuisine is a throwback to the days when steak houses were in vogue. With bookshelf-lined walls, the cavernous dining room has something of a library atmosphere, although it would have more appeal if the lighting were more romantic.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1998 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
It's not quite ready to be called the Restaurant Row of Queen Village, but with the opening of the New Wave Cafe's dining room, Third and Catharine Streets now has two restaurant attractions. For those not familiar with the area, New Wave is directly across from Dmitri's, the very small Mediterranean BYOB where long lines of patrons endure the no-reservations policy to savor the now-legendary fresh fish dishes. It was, the story goes, this policy that helped give birth to New Wave's serious dining room.
NEWS
March 23, 1986 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's nice when a restaurant improves but oh, so sad when the reverse occurs. Unfortunately, that is what has happened to the elegant cuisine and dining room at the former Tall Pines Inn in Sewell. Eagles quarterback Ron Jaworski took over the restaurant and surrounding golf course nearly two years ago, renamed it the Eagles' Nest Golf and Country Club and downgraded the restaurant to an informal dining room with little character and modest food. Now called Mulligan's, the restaurant seems as much a sportsman's hangout as a public dining room.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1991 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
The name of the Ritz-Carlton Hotel's most formal restaurant is simplicity itself: The Dining Room. The generously-proportioned room, with its crystal chandeliers and discreet piano music, is quite proper and restrained. The service is correct and unobtrusive. By now, you may be thinking: Uh-oh, here it comes. Boring food. On the contrary. Alsatian-born chef Philippe Reininger is turning out dazzlingly beautiful, original dishes that tickle the imagination as well as the palate.
FOOD
June 18, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
In one breath, Susanna Foo explains that she is leaving these elegant digs on Walnut Street, closing her eponymous landmark of a dining room - the wellspring of her groundbreaking style of French-Chinese fusion - because she needs to "simplify. " She is vigorous still, at 65. But she was stressed from splitting herself - sometimes it almost seemed literally - between the Center City kitchen and her sleeker, newer (since 2006) Radnor restaurant, which will remain open. There's another reason to stay closer to her Main Line home: Her husband's health is not what it once was; a worrisome unsteadiness has crept into his gait.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1998 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Bryn Kaufman has gone from selling microcomputers from the dining room in his father's house to running a $35 million reseller of computer hardware, software and other equipment in the last 13 years. Kaufman moved his company, CMPExpress.com Inc., in October from Broomall to a second-floor office in the Hilltop Professional Building in Brookhaven. The young entrepreneur talks about tripling his 40-person workforce during the next year and getting ready for an initial public offering.
FOOD
July 23, 2000 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
There are no windows in the luxurious dining room of the newly christened Westin hotel Grill Room. Its walls are so padded with posh green upholstery and dark wood accents that it feels like eating inside a Victorian sofa. Alone. That's right. There are virtually no customers in this dining room. And it is Friday night. What a strange sensation to sit in a space so lavish, decked with fine linens and crystal, an orchid on every table, the antique breakfronts filled with china, and watch all these gracious padded armchairs remain empty.
NEWS
May 18, 2007 | By Alan Jaffe FOR THE INQUIRER
Longtime visitors remember Wida's, a mainstay built in the 1920s that in more recent years billed itself as "an old-fashioned seashore hotel like grandmother used to frequent. " Well, grandma, Wida's is gone. But unlike the island's cedar-shingled bungalows that were torn down and replaced with vinyl-sided seamonsters, Wida's has undergone a face-lift, an update, and a name change. Say hello to Daddy O. Martin Grims, the restaurateur who owns the Moshulu and several Main Line bistros, has turned the old Brant Beach structure into a 22-room boutique hotel and dining room aimed at the hip, urbane patron.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2012 | By Christine Bahls and FOR THE INQUIRER
Since 2000, 50,306 additional people between the ages of 20 and 34 moved into the city of Philadelphia, according to the 2010 Census. Meet two of them: David and Jackie Zavitz. This young couple, who met in Washington, where they were both living at the time, chose to move to Philadelphia when they married in 2003. "We wanted to put down roots," says Jackie, 34, a search professional with Korn/Ferry International. Philadelphia is "very accessible. I love city living. It's been a joy that way. " They bought, and renovated, their first home in Queen Village, and in 2007 hoped to buy a bigger place in the neighborhood but prices were too high.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1994 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
The server was uncorking champagne almost as if she were taking part in a locker-room sports celebration. Between pops, she noticed a gentleman's empty glass - one she had filled only moments before. "Oh. I see your glass has a hole in it, sir," she said good-naturedly. "Yes," the diner agreed. "Could you fill it please?" And more bubbly was poured. The unlimited champagne was part of a $19.95 brunch held Sundays at Marriott's Seaview Resort on Route 9 in Absecon.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
February 15, 2015 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
It was 2010. The kids were grown and out of the house. Ron Ettinger was tired of cutting grass and shoveling snow - he wanted to downsize. At 60, he was ready to move to a new home in a 55-and-over community. His wife, Hope, then 50, was not keen on the idea. She was too young to live in such a place and had always wanted to restore an old house. Though he is a talented woodworker, Ron nixed that notion. "I know my limits," he says. "Restoring takes more than being handy. " A visit to Montebello, a 55-plus community in West Berlin near their Voorhees home, helped Hope grow more amenable to Ron's plan.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Even before the front door is opened - even before one climbs the outside steps of the Spinelli home in Riverton - the dazzle begins curbside. The wraparound porch, the gazebo - and in this season, the lights and decorations - all suggest that something magical is unfolding. This is an exceptional place in any season, but at Christmas, the pre-Victorian home takes on a glow with an aura of yesteryears that blur present and future. The soaring ceilings, the woodwork, the fireplaces and arches and crown moldings all explain why 700 visitors poured in for a holiday tour sponsored by the Riverton Free Library last year.
FOOD
November 6, 2014 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Bar/restaurant plus butcher Across the street from the artisan work at the new La Colombe Torrefaction flagship in Fishtown, restaurateur Michael Pasquarello and butcher Bryan Mayer are behind the new Kensington Quarters (1310 Frankford Ave., 267-314-5086). It's a bar/restaurant with a butcher counter and classroom built in. Mayer, one of the godfathers of a new generation of butchers, ran the show at Fleisher's Grass-Fed & Organic Meats in New York. A chance meeting with Pasquarello - who with his wife, Jeniphur, owns Cafe Lift, Prohibition Taproom, and Bufad - sent him, his wife and daughter to Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
FORTESCUE, N.J. - As volunteers had done at least a half-dozen times in the last few months, a group came to scrub, scrape, and paint to try to save the old Charlesworth Hotel, inundated two years ago by Hurricane Sandy. When the sunny morning rolled into a dark and cloudy midafternoon, one of the 20 or so volunteers noticed a piano among the still topsy-turvy mess of the main dining room. An impromptu concert broke out featuring Bach, Chopin, show tunes, and that beginner's favorite, "Heart and Soul.
REAL_ESTATE
October 12, 2014 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
Once Dora Siemel saw the cedar house on the Unami Watershed in Green Lane, Montgomery County, she knew she had found a place Buddha would have yearned for. The setting is calming, verdant and serene. "There is no ugly way to get here," she says of the journey through abundant woodlands, where creeks snake past colossal boulders. The land is home to fox, deer, trout, and several species of salamander. That tranquil spirit also exists inside the two-story, 2,200-square-foot house where Siemel and her husband, Bob Wolfarth, have lived for 22 years.
REAL_ESTATE
August 17, 2014 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Teresa Shields Westkaemper lives in a sprawling four-bedroom house in Jenkintown with husband Paul Westkaemper and their three daughters. She is an accomplished watercolorist with a master's degree in fine art, and a very specific artistic sensibility: She loves circles and the colors red and blue. "I can't tell you why I like circles, but I always have, and I express them everywhere," she says. It makes sense, then, that after a renovation that included demolishing and rebuilding the rear of the structure, the Westkaemper home is blue in the front and has a red caboose, so to speak.
REAL_ESTATE
June 23, 2014 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Looking down from the wall of the dining room of Fred and Elizabeth Walker's home in Wyndmoor are Jean Baptiste and Francoise Verdenal, who came to the United States from France in 1830 and made their way to St. Louis before ultimately traveling in a covered wagon to California, where they settled in 1852. "They were my ancestors, many generations back," Fred Walker says. "My mother gave me the portraits, which had been sitting in her attic for years, and we restored them and set them on our wall of our new house here.
REAL_ESTATE
April 14, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
At first glance, Darlene and Bart Ingraldi's Hainesport house looks like a well-designed and well-decorated traditional one, with contemporary touches. Look around some more, though, and it's clear that this house combines convention with whimsy, the pleasantly ordinary with the totally extraordinary. Bart Ingraldi is a collector of the old and unusual, most especially ephemera - those things not initially meant to be preserved, and particularly, but not limited to, paper items. "I inherited this happy madness from my parents, and even when I was a kid, I loved old things," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kitchen design used to be simple: It was all about the work triangle, allowing the cook to move efficiently from refrigerator to range to sink. Now, though, designers have more complex calculations to make. After all, the work triangle never accounted for the second island, the extra prep sink, or the double oven - or where to situate the love seat, fireplace, tablet-docking station, and flat-screen television. "It's quite a revolutionary time in kitchens," Philadelphia kitchen designer Joanne Hudson said.
NEWS
February 16, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Marc Vetri has heard the jokes about battling for pizza dollars with Sbarro, his neighbor at the Moorestown Mall. He's heard the wisecracks about needing to accessorize with blinking pagers - and a Cheesecake Factory line's worth of waiting diners - if his new Osteria is to amount to anything in chain-crazy South Jersey. But Vetri, as much a master contrarian as he is a maestro of ethereal "Francobolli" ravioli and spit-roasted suckling pig, is ready to prove his doubters wrong. Again.
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