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Dining Room

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NEWS
November 5, 1989 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
While newer hotel restaurants generally emphasize quality of cuisine, the Haymarket dining room in the Mount Laurel Hilton sticks to the tried and true. Unfortunately, the old ways no longer seem so good. The unexciting decor in this brightly lighted restaurant seems little changed over the years, while the cuisine is a throwback to the days when steak houses were in vogue. With bookshelf-lined walls, the cavernous dining room has something of a library atmosphere, although it would have more appeal if the lighting were more romantic.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1998 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
It's not quite ready to be called the Restaurant Row of Queen Village, but with the opening of the New Wave Cafe's dining room, Third and Catharine Streets now has two restaurant attractions. For those not familiar with the area, New Wave is directly across from Dmitri's, the very small Mediterranean BYOB where long lines of patrons endure the no-reservations policy to savor the now-legendary fresh fish dishes. It was, the story goes, this policy that helped give birth to New Wave's serious dining room.
NEWS
March 23, 1986 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's nice when a restaurant improves but oh, so sad when the reverse occurs. Unfortunately, that is what has happened to the elegant cuisine and dining room at the former Tall Pines Inn in Sewell. Eagles quarterback Ron Jaworski took over the restaurant and surrounding golf course nearly two years ago, renamed it the Eagles' Nest Golf and Country Club and downgraded the restaurant to an informal dining room with little character and modest food. Now called Mulligan's, the restaurant seems as much a sportsman's hangout as a public dining room.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1991 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
The name of the Ritz-Carlton Hotel's most formal restaurant is simplicity itself: The Dining Room. The generously-proportioned room, with its crystal chandeliers and discreet piano music, is quite proper and restrained. The service is correct and unobtrusive. By now, you may be thinking: Uh-oh, here it comes. Boring food. On the contrary. Alsatian-born chef Philippe Reininger is turning out dazzlingly beautiful, original dishes that tickle the imagination as well as the palate.
FOOD
June 18, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
In one breath, Susanna Foo explains that she is leaving these elegant digs on Walnut Street, closing her eponymous landmark of a dining room - the wellspring of her groundbreaking style of French-Chinese fusion - because she needs to "simplify. " She is vigorous still, at 65. But she was stressed from splitting herself - sometimes it almost seemed literally - between the Center City kitchen and her sleeker, newer (since 2006) Radnor restaurant, which will remain open. There's another reason to stay closer to her Main Line home: Her husband's health is not what it once was; a worrisome unsteadiness has crept into his gait.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1998 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Bryn Kaufman has gone from selling microcomputers from the dining room in his father's house to running a $35 million reseller of computer hardware, software and other equipment in the last 13 years. Kaufman moved his company, CMPExpress.com Inc., in October from Broomall to a second-floor office in the Hilltop Professional Building in Brookhaven. The young entrepreneur talks about tripling his 40-person workforce during the next year and getting ready for an initial public offering.
FOOD
July 23, 2000 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
There are no windows in the luxurious dining room of the newly christened Westin hotel Grill Room. Its walls are so padded with posh green upholstery and dark wood accents that it feels like eating inside a Victorian sofa. Alone. That's right. There are virtually no customers in this dining room. And it is Friday night. What a strange sensation to sit in a space so lavish, decked with fine linens and crystal, an orchid on every table, the antique breakfronts filled with china, and watch all these gracious padded armchairs remain empty.
NEWS
May 18, 2007 | By Alan Jaffe FOR THE INQUIRER
Longtime visitors remember Wida's, a mainstay built in the 1920s that in more recent years billed itself as "an old-fashioned seashore hotel like grandmother used to frequent. " Well, grandma, Wida's is gone. But unlike the island's cedar-shingled bungalows that were torn down and replaced with vinyl-sided seamonsters, Wida's has undergone a face-lift, an update, and a name change. Say hello to Daddy O. Martin Grims, the restaurateur who owns the Moshulu and several Main Line bistros, has turned the old Brant Beach structure into a 22-room boutique hotel and dining room aimed at the hip, urbane patron.
FOOD
April 3, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
A new heritage Heritage , a rustic combination of bar, restaurant, and jazz/funk venue, and arguably the boldest restaurant project ever in Northern Liberties, opened this week at 914-22 N. Second St. (215-627-7500), across from Cescaphe Ballroom. Owners Jason Evenchik and Terry Leach (Time, Bar, Vintage, Growlers, Garage) have completely redone the workaday building that housed Feast Your Eyes catering. Wide-open, warehouselike interior, reminiscent of the new La Colombe in Fishtown, has greenery everywhere: ringing the ceiling, behind the bar, and outside on the roof, as well as in a side garden that will have seating.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1994 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
The server was uncorking champagne almost as if she were taking part in a locker-room sports celebration. Between pops, she noticed a gentleman's empty glass - one she had filled only moments before. "Oh. I see your glass has a hole in it, sir," she said good-naturedly. "Yes," the diner agreed. "Could you fill it please?" And more bubbly was poured. The unlimited champagne was part of a $19.95 brunch held Sundays at Marriott's Seaview Resort on Route 9 in Absecon.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Everyone knows the chef's name. After all, this story began at a ristorante called Vetri. But behind every Marc Vetri success, and the company's growing roster of Italian concepts, the chef's longtime business partner and dining room alter ego, Jeff Benjamin, has been there every step of the way. He's Mr. Logistic to the Pasta Maestro, making sure the inspired plates are delivered with hospitality and grace. Multiple nods from the James Beard Foundation as one of America's best service teams attest to that achievement.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
DOLORES CLARK, 86, bowls on Friday afternoons at Liberty Lanes with her Nifty Fifty's seniors team and line dances on Tuesdays at the Older Adult Sunshine Center on 58th Street near Walnut. She lives a fiercely independent life in the Mantua rowhouse that her father bought in 1939, a former grocery store on Melon Street near 39th that he turned into her beloved childhood home. When Clark's adult children tried to persuade her to move into an assisted living community, she refused.
FOOD
April 3, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
A new heritage Heritage , a rustic combination of bar, restaurant, and jazz/funk venue, and arguably the boldest restaurant project ever in Northern Liberties, opened this week at 914-22 N. Second St. (215-627-7500), across from Cescaphe Ballroom. Owners Jason Evenchik and Terry Leach (Time, Bar, Vintage, Growlers, Garage) have completely redone the workaday building that housed Feast Your Eyes catering. Wide-open, warehouselike interior, reminiscent of the new La Colombe in Fishtown, has greenery everywhere: ringing the ceiling, behind the bar, and outside on the roof, as well as in a side garden that will have seating.
REAL_ESTATE
March 29, 2015 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
Enter the dining room of Palmer and Judy Hartl's regal rowhouse in Society Hill, and your eye is drawn to an imposing Empire buffet made of crotch mahogany. So powerful is its scale that the piece would be out of place in a less splendid setting. But here, it's right at home, sharing space with a Knabe grand piano, a glass-topped dining table, and a gilded mirror. "The dining room is my favorite place in the home, especially at night, when the lighting looks great," says Palmer Hartl, 72, who sees the same majesty in the 9,000-square-foot, four-story house that he first saw 15 years ago. Back then, the couple owned a three-acre property in Gladwyne with expansive gardens and a pool.
REAL_ESTATE
March 15, 2015 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Living in an 1835 Society Hill townhouse might spur some people to decorate to suit that period. Not Yvonne Novak and Aaron Weindling, who say they don't want to fill their 180-year-old home on South Seventh Street with Chippendale furniture and wingback chairs. "It is our home and not a museum. Antique sofas are hard to find, expensive, and not very comfortable," Novak says. "We have chosen to adopt a combination of previously owned and new things that fit our space and our lifestyle.
FOOD
March 13, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Mexican on the corner If early crowds are an indication, Joseph and Theresa Rimmer Scull have hit on the right combination at 22d and Carpenter Streets with a Mexican bar called Los Camaradas (918 S. 22d St., 215-309-3727). After a spell as Divan Turkish Kitchen, the bar had been two short-lived clunkers, SoWe and the Strip Joint, under different management. The Sculls - he was chef at the late Solaris Grille in Chestnut Hill, while she is a former beverage manager at La Calaca Feliz in Fairmount - added sconces and other decorative pieces from Mexico.
REAL_ESTATE
March 8, 2015 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
In 1991, Kristin and Steve Stoughton were 24 and engaged to be married. Knowing that they wanted to buy an older house, Steve's employer made a bold suggestion. The boss, a residential developer, was planning to build several houses on a tract in Fort Washington. Would Steve and his fiancee be interested in buying a battered farmhouse and barn on the site? Sure would. The barn and the small three-story dwelling dated to the late 1840s. Two-story additions were added in the 1920s and 1940s.
REAL_ESTATE
February 23, 2015 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Kristin Recchiuti was on maternity leave about five years ago when it occurred to her that the 3,000-square-foot house she and husband Ed purchased in North Wales in 1998 was no longer working out for them. "We bought the house as a bargain in 1998 for $318,000, but it needed a lot of work now that we had three kids and a different lifestyle," Kristin says. The Recchiutis both work in the health-care industry for major corporations. Both are involved in patient education. "Maternity leaves can be dangerous because you have time on your hands and time to think," she says.
REAL_ESTATE
February 15, 2015 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
It was 2010. The kids were grown and out of the house. Ron Ettinger was tired of cutting grass and shoveling snow - he wanted to downsize. At 60, he was ready to move to a new home in a 55-and-over community. His wife, Hope, then 50, was not keen on the idea. She was too young to live in such a place and had always wanted to restore an old house. Though he is a talented woodworker, Ron nixed that notion. "I know my limits," he says. "Restoring takes more than being handy. " A visit to Montebello, a 55-plus community in West Berlin near their Voorhees home, helped Hope grow more amenable to Ron's plan.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Even before the front door is opened - even before one climbs the outside steps of the Spinelli home in Riverton - the dazzle begins curbside. The wraparound porch, the gazebo - and in this season, the lights and decorations - all suggest that something magical is unfolding. This is an exceptional place in any season, but at Christmas, the pre-Victorian home takes on a glow with an aura of yesteryears that blur present and future. The soaring ceilings, the woodwork, the fireplaces and arches and crown moldings all explain why 700 visitors poured in for a holiday tour sponsored by the Riverton Free Library last year.
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