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Dining Room

REAL_ESTATE
May 2, 1986 | By Sheila Dyan, Special to The Inquirer
Twin Ponds, Washington Township, Gloucester County, N.J. (609) 589-6700 The Cutler Organization is building 168 three- and four-bedroom houses at Twin Ponds in Washington Township, N.J., just minutes from the Atlantic City Expressway in Gloucester County. The Colonial and traditional houses will offer 1,390 to 2,485 square feet of living space, and prices, without optional features, range from $81,500 to $101,500. Standard in each house will be gas hot-air heat; a self-cleaning oven; garbage disposal; dishwasher; a one- or two-car garage (depending on the model)
REAL_ESTATE
July 22, 1988 | By Sheila Dyan, Special to The Inquirer
TALL TIMBERS Little Egg Harbor Township 609-296-2601 Tall Timbers, about midway between Atlantic City and Long Beach Island, is a development of townhouses and flats under construction in Little Egg Harbor Township. Planned for the 151-acre wooded site are 798 one- and two-story fee-simple townhomes, 412 condominium flats and 48 acres of open space. (Fee simple means buyers will own and maintain the exterior and grounds of their units.) The units will have between 800 and 1,440 square feet of living space, and the price range for the standard units is between $71,990 and $99,990.
REAL_ESTATE
February 8, 1991 | By Sheila Dyan, Special to The Inquirer
DEER CHASE Monroe Township, Gloucester County 609-875-7901 At Deer Chase at Monroe, buyers have a choice of two exterior elevations for each home, and one of them has a porch, at no extra cost. Those porches are part of an effort to give the development some "old neighborhood charm," as are the granite Belgian blocks used in the curbs, said Luana Walters, a sales representative for the builder, Kalian Corp. She said Kalian was interested not only in charm but also in saving as many trees on the site as possible to help preserve the natural environment of the neighborhood.
NEWS
May 7, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Andreotti's Viennese Cafe opened in Cherry Hill in 1983, Marianne Andreotti would deliver her restaurant's seven-cheese spread to people sitting outside in their cars, waiting for a table. "We were so afraid they were going to leave," said Andreotti, whose father, Mark, started the restaurant on Route 70, then primarily a pastry shop with lunch seating. The patrons stayed, and the Andreottis expanded, over the years adding a dining room, piano, bar, and dance floor. The space evolved, but the traditions remained, including free hors d'oeuvres and desserts and music and dancing on Saturday nights.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
When Michael Vogel was studying architecture at the University of Pennsylvania, he would spend a lot of his free time building things in the school's furniture-grade wood shop. Ten years as an investment banker, first in New York and then in Philadelphia, did not dull the Elkins Park native's interest in woodworking. "I tried to get access to woodshops regularly, but always found closed doors," Vogel said. The shops he approached would cite wear and tear on the machines, or insurance concerns, or that Vogel would be getting in the way as reasons to shut him out. The alternative was signing up for classes at a woodworking school, thus having regular access to a shop, but his schedule would not allow him to commit to, for example, certain set hours every Monday night.
REAL_ESTATE
February 19, 2012 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Architect Anthony Weber studied in Italy for his master's degree in architecture. In 1988, he rented an apartment at Third and Catharine Streets, where he discovered that many of his neighbors had Italian roots. Weber, who comes from a small town on the Ohio River in Kentucky, fell in love with South Philadelphia. "At that point, the area wasn't exactly trendy," he said. "I liked the neighborhood and felt comfortable near the Italian Market. " The year and a half he spent studying in Italy might have had something to do with that.
NEWS
July 9, 1992 | By Christopher Durso, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
About two months ago, the Costalas family put two words on the sign in front of their Country Squire Diner Restaurant in Broomall, and the phone started ringing. "Ever since we put the sign up," said manager George Costalas with a slight shake of his head, "we've been getting called. " The two words, "Opening Soon," were enough to grab the attention - and stimulate the taste buds - of patrons who have waited for two years for the Country Squire to reopen. It was heavily damaged by fire in August 1990.
NEWS
April 11, 2006 | By Sally Friedman
I hate endings. I sobbed when each of our daughters went off to kindergarten. I did the same when they left for college. I even get melancholy when the seasons change. So I suppose it's predictable that I face another ending with my usual emotional upheaval. But frankly, I'm surprised at how much this one hurts. I'm preparing for the last Passover seder that my husband and I will host. It was bound to happen. It began with our decision, three years ago, to do what the real estate world calls "downsizing.
NEWS
February 20, 2000 | By John V.R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Good food in a dramatic setting makes the Abbey Bistro, the public dining room in the Abington Country Club, a fine restaurant choice. Despite what you might expect from its name, the country club is in Jenkintown, a block behind the well-known Fox Pavilion. The dining room was opened to the public last March. At first glance, the chalet-like dining room with a 30-foot-high vaulted ceiling may take your breath away. Unique among regional restaurants, it has an upper-level balcony, real logs blazing away in a large fieldstone fireplace, and hammered-bronze display plates and lighted white candles in brass candlesticks on the mantel.
NEWS
May 7, 2008 | By Erin Duffy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Maria Perez, the Ronald McDonald House of Southern New Jersey is more than just a place she stays occasionally - it's another home. Perez, who lives in South Carolina, has traveled back and forth to the house for 16 years as her son, Juan, has been treated for retinoblastoma, an eye cancer, at Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia. "In the recent years, I've really enjoyed coming here," she said. "This is where my home is. " Now, families like hers can look forward to even greater care as part of a $2 million expansion announced at a news conference yesterday.
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