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Dining Room

REAL_ESTATE
September 28, 2015 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
When he was growing up in Wyndmoor, Jeffrey Dean Soulges would pass a brick-trimmed white stucco house that intrigued him. He knew it was a dentist's office, and that was about all he knew. "But I did admire the house, even all those years ago," said Soulges, who is now 53. After graduating from Vassar as an English major, he studied design at the University of the Arts and Drexel University and found his real calling. Today, the interior designer lives in that circa 1890 house with his husband, Stephen Rene Freret, 42, a graduate of Mississippi State University and an architect working at Gensler in Philadelphia as a project manager.
REAL_ESTATE
September 6, 2015 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Designing an improved version of the Chestnut Hill house he shares with his family proved to be a more difficult assignment than designing homes for his clients, architect Jeffrey Krieger says. "In some ways, it is harder to work for yourself. There are no clients to bounce things off," he says. "We had three different plans before we hit on the final one, and it took us 15 years to perfect the plan. " Jeffrey and wife Kim, a college-application counselor at a private school, live at the border of Chestnut Hill and Mount Airy in a house built as a rental by Henry Houston, who developed northern Germantown in the late 19th century.
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Everyone knows the chef's name. After all, this story began at a ristorante called Vetri. But behind every Marc Vetri success, and the company's growing roster of Italian concepts, the chef's longtime business partner and dining room alter ego, Jeff Benjamin, has been there every step of the way. He's Mr. Logistic to the Pasta Maestro, making sure the inspired plates are delivered with hospitality and grace. Multiple nods from the James Beard Foundation as one of America's best service teams attest to that achievement.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
DOLORES CLARK, 86, bowls on Friday afternoons at Liberty Lanes with her Nifty Fifty's seniors team and line dances on Tuesdays at the Older Adult Sunshine Center on 58th Street near Walnut. She lives a fiercely independent life in the Mantua rowhouse that her father bought in 1939, a former grocery store on Melon Street near 39th that he turned into her beloved childhood home. When Clark's adult children tried to persuade her to move into an assisted living community, she refused.
FOOD
April 3, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
A new heritage Heritage , a rustic combination of bar, restaurant, and jazz/funk venue, and arguably the boldest restaurant project ever in Northern Liberties, opened this week at 914-22 N. Second St. (215-627-7500), across from Cescaphe Ballroom. Owners Jason Evenchik and Terry Leach (Time, Bar, Vintage, Growlers, Garage) have completely redone the workaday building that housed Feast Your Eyes catering. Wide-open, warehouselike interior, reminiscent of the new La Colombe in Fishtown, has greenery everywhere: ringing the ceiling, behind the bar, and outside on the roof, as well as in a side garden that will have seating.
REAL_ESTATE
March 29, 2015 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
Enter the dining room of Palmer and Judy Hartl's regal rowhouse in Society Hill, and your eye is drawn to an imposing Empire buffet made of crotch mahogany. So powerful is its scale that the piece would be out of place in a less splendid setting. But here, it's right at home, sharing space with a Knabe grand piano, a glass-topped dining table, and a gilded mirror. "The dining room is my favorite place in the home, especially at night, when the lighting looks great," says Palmer Hartl, 72, who sees the same majesty in the 9,000-square-foot, four-story house that he first saw 15 years ago. Back then, the couple owned a three-acre property in Gladwyne with expansive gardens and a pool.
REAL_ESTATE
March 15, 2015 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Living in an 1835 Society Hill townhouse might spur some people to decorate to suit that period. Not Yvonne Novak and Aaron Weindling, who say they don't want to fill their 180-year-old home on South Seventh Street with Chippendale furniture and wingback chairs. "It is our home and not a museum. Antique sofas are hard to find, expensive, and not very comfortable," Novak says. "We have chosen to adopt a combination of previously owned and new things that fit our space and our lifestyle.
FOOD
March 13, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Mexican on the corner If early crowds are an indication, Joseph and Theresa Rimmer Scull have hit on the right combination at 22d and Carpenter Streets with a Mexican bar called Los Camaradas (918 S. 22d St., 215-309-3727). After a spell as Divan Turkish Kitchen, the bar had been two short-lived clunkers, SoWe and the Strip Joint, under different management. The Sculls - he was chef at the late Solaris Grille in Chestnut Hill, while she is a former beverage manager at La Calaca Feliz in Fairmount - added sconces and other decorative pieces from Mexico.
REAL_ESTATE
March 8, 2015 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
In 1991, Kristin and Steve Stoughton were 24 and engaged to be married. Knowing that they wanted to buy an older house, Steve's employer made a bold suggestion. The boss, a residential developer, was planning to build several houses on a tract in Fort Washington. Would Steve and his fiancee be interested in buying a battered farmhouse and barn on the site? Sure would. The barn and the small three-story dwelling dated to the late 1840s. Two-story additions were added in the 1920s and 1940s.
REAL_ESTATE
February 23, 2015 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Kristin Recchiuti was on maternity leave about five years ago when it occurred to her that the 3,000-square-foot house she and husband Ed purchased in North Wales in 1998 was no longer working out for them. "We bought the house as a bargain in 1998 for $318,000, but it needed a lot of work now that we had three kids and a different lifestyle," Kristin says. The Recchiutis both work in the health-care industry for major corporations. Both are involved in patient education. "Maternity leaves can be dangerous because you have time on your hands and time to think," she says.
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