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NEWS
October 19, 1989 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
Members of the Main Line Chamber of Commerce had no trouble grasping the message of their guest speaker at the organization's $75-a-plate, red-carpet dinner Tuesday night. The speaker, Msgr. Andrew J. McGowan, director of community relations at Mercy Hospital, Scranton, blended his wit with a call for community involvement before about 200 members and their spouses at the Great Valley Hilton and Conference Center. His speech was interrupted with applause and laughter, and after the dinner, members swarmed around him with congratulations.
NEWS
September 19, 2003
IAGREE with your Sept. 16 editorial on the waterworks. The city should encourage the restaurateur who can provide the most exquisite dining experience. As for the obstacles: complicated parking, structural and historical limitations, and the need to fit a wide range of diners' pocketbooks, the first two are routinely encountered when dining in Center City or Old City, and the last needn't be an issue. The restaurant should be a special destination/special occasion one that would be so tempting to "foodies" that they would travel here and stay overnight.
NEWS
May 6, 1987 | By RON GOLDWYN, Daily News Staff Writer
It's the only political fund-raiser for which candidates pay $125 a ticket, knowing the money may help somebody they're running against. That's the Democratic City Committee dinner, which drew about 1,600 party faithful to the Franklin Plaza last night, according to treasurer Norman Loudenslager. Another 300 or so paid $250 apiece for a cocktail reception. Mayor Goode, the guest of the party that endorses him, made it clear - in the name of unity - that he will be fielding his own slate of candidates in the May 19 primary.
NEWS
February 24, 1987 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last night might have been the best night of the year to snag a table without a reservation or a wait at the city's best restaurants - the streets were clear, the parking was decent, yet hordes of people had canceled their reservations earlier and stayed home. An informal telephone survey of some of the city's better restaurants turned up a bunch of lonely restaurant managers amid empty tables, mostly because the unusual nature of the storm produced piles of forbidding snow in the morning that quickly melted on the roads, making travel fairly easy later in the day. So, for a rare change, diners could walk into just about any restaurant in the city and get a table without a wait or a reservation - and with an eager staff waiting to serve.
FOOD
June 24, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was billed as a dinner to die for, with dishes from an 1876 cookbook edited by Benjamin Franklin's great-granddaughter (crab soup, sirloin roasted on a spit, Scandinavian Almond Cake) and "entertainment" at the grave sites of Philadelphia culinary notables. "Dig In: A Culinary Tour and Class," held June 11, featured dinner by chef Chris Koch at the Marketplace at East Falls, after which two dozen or so daring participants walked across the street with West Chester University English professor Michael W. Brooks for a twilight stroll through Laurel Hill Cemetery, bats and all. For Laurel Hill, which offers programs at least once a month year-round, the culinary venture was a successful first.
NEWS
June 15, 1994 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Over and over, we hear that the nagging by Republicans, the media and former female acquaintances should end, and President Clinton should be allowed to do his job. I'm in favor of everyone doing the job for which they are hired and paid, whether it is a corporate CEO, a bartender or a kid who mows the lawn. And at times I'm amazed that anyone has the energy and brains for the demands of the presidency, which is the most awesome job in the world. So I would be delighted and relieved if President Clinton could be spared distractions.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
State Sen. Manville Powell, candidate for mayor of Philadelphia, cordially invites you to a campaign fund-raising dinner, during which he will be murdered. He probably has it coming - he's a thoroughly disagreeable sort - and David Goldstein is more than happy to oblige. Goldstein has been killing off politicians at dinner for more than a year. Right now the murders are occurring in Boston; Dallas, and Shrewsbury, Mass., as well as in Philadelphia. And in September, the mayhem will spread to Tampa, Fla., and Sacramento, Calif.
LIVING
December 12, 1997 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
When someone is adopted and leaves the children's home where Pamela lives, she cries. She's happy for her friend, but filled with sadness that she's not going, too. "Don't forget me," she says. "I'll really miss you. " And then the child is gone. Pamela wants to belong to a family, too. One of her dreams is to sit down to dinner with her family. "Please pass the potatoes, Mom. No thanks, Dad, no sauerkraut or spinach. " They'll be smiling at her, so happy to be together.
FOOD
November 29, 2007 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
New-age Irish singer Enya's music played softly in the background, as the freshly lit candles sent a soft glow over a table graced with fine china and generous glasses of wine on a table covered with a crisp linen cloth. Yup, it's Wednesday night dinner at Scott and Maureen Murphy's modest townhouse in Chesterbrook - and that's how it is every night. But it wasn't always so. Scott Murphy was happy to take on the task of making dinner every night after he and Maureen got married.
FOOD
May 1, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Really, it's just a matter of semantics. We'll call the same four ingredients (bread, eggs, cheese, butter) "breakfast" or "dinner," depending on the hour at hand. And yet, somehow, when you're not in college, turning out an omelet past 4 p.m. feels like a small act of rebellion. For some of us, that's reason enough to go for it. But there are plenty of other great reasons to make the most important meal of the day at sundown. In their book Breakfast for Dinner (Quirk, 2013) bloggers Lindsay Landis and Taylor Hackbarth point out that, by definition, breakfast is comfort food, so whether it's pizza with an egg on it or shrimp and grits (both recipes in their book)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: Recently, an engaged couple that my boyfriend and I dine with semiregularly bailed at the last minute on long-standing dinner reservations at a nice restaurant. Their cancellation was so last-minute we couldn't have canceled the reservation even if we'd wanted to; fortunately, another couple was included in the reservation and the four of us were able to enjoy dinner together. The guy texted all of us, saying that dinner wasn't "in the cards" for them due to wedding-registry activities.
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
HUNGRY PIGEON 743 S. Fourth St., 215-278-2736; hungrypigeon.com   What's it like to eat breakfast, lunch, and dinner at a chef's house? Probably just like this lovable all-day corner cafe in Queen Village, where old pals and co-chef-owners Pat O'Malley (ex-Balthazar; ¡Pasion!) and Scott Schroeder (South Philadelphia Tap Room; American Sardine Bar) collaborate for updated comfort menus built on stellar house-baked goods, great local ingredients, and quirky whims, from the city's best new breakfast sandwich to fun sharing platters at dinner (and, yes, some tasty pigeon)
NEWS
March 13, 2016
On March 3, the Pennsylvania Ballet presented the world premiere of artistic director Angel Corella's Don Quixote . More than 100 attended a special Don Quixote -theme dinner at the Academy of Music. The evening, which raised $99,450, was a Spanish-inspired event featuring cocktails and dinner, followed by the the Pennsylvania Ballet's performance of the classic. The company performed the ballet for the first time in its 53-year history.  
FOOD
February 5, 2016
Although it's a good idea to take a break from the holiday overload of carbs, it's important not to lump all carbohydrates together. Veggies, whole fruits, beans, and whole grains are carb-rich foods we should resolve to eat more of. They are satisfying and packed with essential nutrients, health-protective antioxidants, and fiber. Orecchiette With Escarole, White Beans 4 servings   1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, more for pasta water 12 ounces dried whole-grain orecchiette pasta 1/4 cup olive oil 4 medium cloves garlic, thinly sliced 1 medium head escarole, chopped (6 cups lightly packed; may sub kale, spinach, or arugula)
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By John N. McGuire, Staff Writer
In all the years Gene Costill was an elected official in Clayton, including five terms as mayor in the 1960s and '70s, he had a model, he said - his grandfather Elwood Costill, the little Gloucester County borough's second mayor. Elwood Costill, a lawyer who was a Union soldier during the Civil War, helped found the borough in 1887. "All my life, I've looked back at what he did and how he was able to accomplish what he did, and I figured, 'Well, I've got to do something,' " he said.
FOOD
January 29, 2016
I'm a sucker for a good can of tuna, and this recipe gives it a slightly sophisticated profile, with greens, eggs, and a bit of Parmesan cheese. It's quick to put together, and so pantry-friendly you might not even have to shop. You do need a jumbo-muffin pan. Tuna Spinach Tortas 4 to 6 servings   10 ounces frozen spinach, preferably in a bag rather than in a block Two 5-ounce cans tuna packed in olive oil 1/4 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese 1/2 cup plain panko (bread crumbs)
NEWS
January 24, 2016 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Ali stood in a crowded Old City bar when a tall, handsome guy caught her eye. She smiled at him, then turned her attention back to her friends. Later, Mr. Tall and Handsome walked up beside her. "Hi, I'm Matt," was all he said - and all he needed to. Within the swarm of young people gathered that night in December 2008, Matt, a software engineer at Orion Systems Inc. in Huntingdon Valley, and Ali, then in her senior year at Temple's Fox School of Business, managed to have a real conversation.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | Howard Gensler, Staff Writer
The four members of ABBA may not get together for a reunion concert - or even a cup of coffee - but they did get together for a new business venture in Stockholm. It's kind of a "Mamma Mia!" spin-off - a dining-entertainment venue, based on the Greek taverna featured in the movie. The BBC reports that venue is the idea of ABBA's Bjorn Ulvaeus , who was joined opening night by Benny Andersson , Anni-Frid Lyngstad , and Agnetha Faltskog . Fans and guests last night paid the Swedish equivalent of $157 to party with the mega-selling pop stars at the Tyrol restaurant.
FOOD
January 22, 2016
Although this dish looks like something you've tasted before, the combination of Chinese five-spice powder and a garlicky ginger-scallion topping makes it altogether different. You'll need an instant-read thermometer and a good exhaust fan. Five-Spice Steak 4 to 6 servings 1 bone-in rib eye steak (about 1 pound, at least 1 inch thick) 11/2 teaspoons Chinese five-spice powder 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper 1 small red Thai/bird's-eye chili pepper 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil 1 clove garlic 1-inch piece fresh ginger root 1 tablespoon unseasoned rice vinegar 2 teaspoons tamari (may sub low-sodium soy sauce)
NEWS
January 19, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
St. Paul School principal William Robbins has a new mantra these days: Keep the struggling parish school strong. A year ago, it was a different story at the school in Burlington City, where the chorus among students and teachers was to save the school. Last January, the school successfully pulled off a frantic six-week campaign that raised more than $250,000 to keep its doors open for the current school year. Robbins hailed it a miracle. "It was kind of scary," said Student Council president Erin Turpin, 13, of Burlington Township.
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