CollectionsDinner
IN THE NEWS

Dinner

FIND MORE STORIES »
FOOD
February 14, 2014 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Along with the drugstores' heart-shaped boxes, they should probably offer free first-aid kits on Valentine's Day, because no other holiday inspires so much well-meaning, overambitious, and underexperienced cooking. Still, if it doesn't send involved parties to the emergency room, the right home-cooked meal could be an important turning point in a relationship, the moment of dawning realization that this thing could actually last. Food legend is filled with such recipes - engagement chicken and marry-me lasagna and kiss-me kugel - dishes that are supposedly so delicious that they inspire proposals or at least romantic escalation.
NEWS
November 29, 2013 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there As Ron walked toward Pat's front door on the May 2012 evening of their blind date, his friend handed him a bouquet of flowers. "Take these to her," she said. Forgive Ron, a mostly retired insurance executive from St. Davids, for not thinking of the flowers himself. He was a little rusty. Ron, now 72, had been married to Maggie for 44 years. They raised Mimi, David, and Michael, and were enjoying semiretirement, grandchildren, travel, and golf when Maggie became ill. She died of lung cancer in 2011.
NEWS
November 29, 2013 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Columnist
For a kid who grew up along the trolley tracks just outside of West Philadelphia, it's amazing how a few olive trees in Greece can always bring tears to my eyes. It happened again in September, as I said goodbye to my mother's farmer-sister, set to walk across the village of Asopos, and turned that first corner where, eventually, she and all the others were no longer in view. Because, for the last two decades, here is how it has gone down every time I've hit that corner: I realize the time with family is over.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Kathryn and Gordon met for what was supposed to be an early dinner in January 2011. But when dinner was over, their conversation wasn't. "We moved from our table to the bar and continued talking," said Kathryn, a financial representative with the Northwestern Mutual Financial Network and owner of the Eventchic event management company. They stayed at Derek's Restaurant in Manayunk for eight hours. About a week earlier, Kathryn had started their dialogue with an electronic wink on Match.com.
NEWS
October 21, 2013 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
I'm so excited about a new restaurant that just opened in a trendy part of Brooklyn. You know what's on the menu? Silence. You got it. I'm going, and I'm taking Mother Mary. It's true. This new restaurant has rules, and one of the rules is that you're not allowed to talk in the restaurant. This is an even better restaurant rule than my personal favorite, Employees Must Wash Hands Before Returning to Work. The restaurant owner got the idea for a silent-dining restaurant after a trip he took to India, where he saw Buddhist monks eating breakfast without talking.
NEWS
September 27, 2013
* Epic, Emmy-winning AMC drama "Breaking Bad" ends Sunday night, and Old Eagle Tavern (177 Markle St., 215-483-5535, oldeagletavern. com ) knows attention must be paid, yo! The Manayunk bar continues its "Dinner, Beer and a Movie Night" series with a screening of the finale at 9 p.m., plus a "Bad"-inspired beer and food menu. The fifth season will air all day. * Argue the worthiness of various pumpkin beers for a worthy cause Saturday during The Great Pumpkin Debate, a beer tasting and hayride, 6-10 p.m., at the Figure 8 Barn, in Bellevue State Park, 800 Carr Road, Wilmington, Del. It's also the 25th annual National Estuaries Day, and the Partnership for the Delaware Estuary will raise a "Toast to the Coast" in support of restoring and protecting waterways.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By Samantha Melamed, For The Inquirer
Come September, most kids can count on one thing: the start of school. But many families make sure their students-to-be can rely on something else: a personal back-to-school tradition. From baked goods that serve as tokens of parental support to those first-day-of-class photo sessions, moms say it gives them and their kids something to look forward to each year, and helps just a little to ease the first-day jitters. Mimi Larkin has a great deal of experience with the subject: 14 years to be precise.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: My father married a woman 20 years younger than he. Since he passed away two years ago, his widow hasn't invited us over to the house I grew up in, and she has had extensive work done on the house. She sent my daughter a birthday card, but nothing else. When my brother came to town, she was too busy to see him. When my nephew visited, she dropped off cookies and a gift for his kids, but left because she didn't want to drive in the rain. She accepts dinner invitations, always comes on Thanksgiving, and occasionally pays.
TRAVEL
June 17, 2013 | By Elaine Rose, For The Inquirer
It was time to put up or shut up. I had been talking about moving to Canada for nearly a decade. Nine months after leaving my job, I was too distracted to finish my latest writing project. A friend suggested I hole up in British Columbia for a couple of months to complete the work and get a taste of life north of the border. After my meteorologist friend in Omaha told me it wasn't downright crazy to attempt a drive to Western Canada in the dead of winter, I started planning. Using Craigslist, I found a pet-friendly rental for February and March in Powell River, a small city on British Columbia's Sunshine Coast.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Gillian Flaccus, Associated Press
YORBA LINDA, Calif. - U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr. Doug Burns was on a night reconnaissance mission searching for enemy trucks when he was shot down by antiaircraft fire and taken prisoner during the Vietnam War. Burns broke three vertebrae when he ejected into a rice paddy and spent the first weeks of his captivity strapped to a concrete pallet and then months at a time in solitary confinement. His wife and three children didn't know for years whether he was alive or dead - and when he arrived home 61/2 years later, Burns learned his wife had left him for another man. "It was hard to take, but that's what it was," said Burns, who is now 78 and remarried.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|