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Dinosaurs

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NEWS
October 3, 1993 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
October is National Stamp Collection Month in many countries, and the special stamps issued for the occasion show that dinosaurs have captured the imagination of postal authorities as well as the interest of filmgoers to Jurassic Park. Australia, Canada and New Zealand all issued commemoratives last week depicting the prehistoric beasts. Special cancellations also are available in an effort to promote collecting interest in each country. Australia issued six stamps, each 45 cents, featuring dinosaurs that once roamed the continent.
NEWS
January 26, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JOHN COSTELLO
The skeleton of a fearsome Tyrannosaurus rex, part of the new, $2.5 million permanent exhibit at the Academy of Natural Sciences, captures the attention of onlookers. The exhibit, which features more than a dozen specimens of dinosaurs and other forms of prehistoric life, had its grand opening yesterday at the academy.
NEWS
February 2, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The scene, set in central Montana 70 million years ago, is straight out of a rock video: A bright purple Tyrannosaurus rex, king of the dinosaurs, races by at 35 miles per hour, waving a tail that is pink and yellow. A duckbilled dinosaur - bright yellow - struts by snorting, bellowing a cry somewhere between an oboe and a French horn. Welcome to the new, more colorful world of dinosaurs. This view of dinosaur mating season belongs to Robert Bakker, a Colorado scientist, whose provocative ideas about dinosaurs have helped shake up the world of paleontology, the study of fossils and prehistoric life, over the past decade.
NEWS
November 5, 1989 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Walking through the lush tropical setting of Longwood Gardens' fern room, visitors are surrounded by a jungle setting similar to the land where dinosaurs dwelled more than 60 million years ago. Vines grow from rain-forest plants that scrape the ceiling of the Kennett Square conservatory. A pteranodon sculpture hangs overhead as if in flight. Even the sounds of prehistoric times are recreated as replicas of parasaurolophus and triceratops move slowly among the plants and make deep, throaty sounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1987 | By Rathe Miller, Special to the Inquirer
Nancy Darmstadter holds the beast in her hands. Its fat neck tapers into a pointed snout, out of which a long, forked tongue continuously flickers. The African Savannah Monitor lizard is as ugly as a wart on the Wicked Witch of the West. But to the kids in this class, who eagerly take turns stroking its scaly head, its cuter than the Pillsbury Doughboy. The class is called "Dinosaurs in Action," and it is part of the Saturday Adventures series at the Academy of Natural Sciences.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1986 | By ROSE DeWOLF, Daily News Staff Writer
Thousands of people are about to discover that much of what they know about dinosaurs - or think they know - is wrong. For example, that all dinosaurs were enormous. For most people, the very word dinosaur calls up the image of a huge beast, as long as a football field, as tall as a hook-and-ladder. But the fact is that not all dinosaurs were giants. There were also smaller ones, some no bigger than a chicken. Or take the ever-popular view that cavemen used to club dinosaurs for dinner.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1988 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
From Connecticut to Maryland, Wawa Food Markets yesterday scrambled to remove up to 120,000 plastic dinosaur cups from its 400 stores. It's not because the cups are a health hazard. It's not because they've been recalled by the manufacturer. It's just that, well - somebody was taking legal action over them. The reptiles pictured on some of the plastic cups may have been drawn by someone other than the person whose name was printed beneath the sketch. The lizards had to go, Wawa officials decided.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2008 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Primeval, an exciting British sci-fi adventure series, takes place in that, um, primeval time and place where dinosaurs roam - the local shopping center. (Where they hunt down and viciously kill and eat unwary shoppers.) The dangerously addictive and entertaining show, which has its U.S. premiere tonight at 9 on BBC America, is a melange of sci-fi, mystery and comedy genres. It is the brainchild of Tim Haines, the writer and director behind the popular BBC nature docs Walking with Dinosaurs and Walking with Beasts, which show the life of those extinct giants through the magic of computer-generated imagery.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1991 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic The Hollywood Reporter contributed to this report
Hollywood is still talking about a recent in-house memorandum, written by Jeffrey Katzenberg, Disney production chief, and promptly leaked, that railed against runaway budgets and the blockbuster mentality. In addition, the buzzword around the studios these days is story-driven, an adjective to describe a movie that draws an audience with its narrative rather than with the magnetism of its stars. All of which serves as an odd climate for what may turn out to be the most expensive movie ever made.
NEWS
May 27, 2012 | By Ramit Plushnick-Masti, Associated Press
HOUSTON - Pups in her womb, a large eye visible behind the rib cage, one baby stuck in the birth canal: all fossilized evidence that this ancient marine beast, the Ichthyosaur, died in childbirth. Jurassic Mom's almost certainly painful death is perfectly preserved in a rare fossil skeleton, one of the many unique items that will go on display in the Houston Museum of Natural Science's $85 million dinosaur hall when it opens to the public Saturday. The Associated Press got a first peek at the exhibit as the finishing touches were put in place.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
THE DINOSAURS of "Jurassic World" mauled a talking teddy bear at the box office this past weekend. Then again, so did an 11-year-old girl. Seth MacFarlane 's "Ted 2" opened far under expectations with $32.9 million, according to Rentrak estimates yesterday, ceding the top two spots to holdovers "Jurassic World" and "Inside Out. " "Jurassic" narrowly held the top spot for the third weekend in a row with a mighty $54.2 million, pushing it...
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
COULD "JURASSIC World" become a reality some day? According to Jack Horner - the world's most renowned paleontologist and a consultant on "Jurassic World" - the answer is yes. "I think one day in the not too distant future, we're going to have the ability to create any animal we want," Horner said. "That includes dinosaurs and even - though it may sound silly - unicorns. " Although Sam Neill's original "Jurassic Park" paleontologist Dr. Alan Grant was based on Horner, he feels it is more of an honor and more important that Steven Spielberg chose him to give the film some scientific plausibility, rather than take the easy way out and do a movie that was science fantasy.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
The celebration of the legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. continues through Sunday at the National Liberty Museum with arts, crafts, and writing. In the spirit of King's "I Have a Dream" speech, you can walk through the museum gallery for inspiration on how to help fulfill the civil rights giant's dream. With ideas you gather from what's on display in the gallery, you can go downstairs to the museum's Kids Craft Corner to compose your own inspiring speech. Celebrating the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King's Jr.'s legacy through Sunday at National Liberty Museum, 312 Chestnut St. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
NEWS
December 17, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ken Lacovara's Drexel University laboratory was crammed with sturdy wooden crates, each one packed with bones from the monster that he affectionately refers to as "Dread. " It was dinosaur shipping time. Seventeen crates, six pallets, 150 bones. The remains of Dreadnoughtus schrani and two smaller prehistoric creatures had to fit inside a 40-foot shipping container on Monday. Would it work? Lacovara, a Drexel paleontologist, announced in September that he and colleagues had discovered the massive beast in the Patagonia region of Argentina.
NEWS
October 4, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Art students commonly learn to draw by sketching a model who is not wearing clothes. In the dim, after-hours light at the Academy of Natural Sciences, Jason Poole's students are drawing from a model without flesh: a dinosaur skeleton. How can you draw a creature no one has ever seen? The bones are key, providing a framework for artists to envision fully formed prehistoric beasts with muscle and skin. Every Monday night for 10 weeks this fall, the 13 adult students enter a side entrance of the venerable natural history museum, sign in with a security guard, and head off to Dinosaur Hall, where they squat on the floor in the shadows of Tyrannosaurus rex . Poole, 44, of East Oak Lane, is their guide, equal parts art teacher and anatomy instructor.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
How do you get a giant creature named after you? The world's largest dinosaur, Dreadnoughtus schrani - Schran's Fearless - honors Adam Schran , founder of a Philadelphia software firm, who looks and sounds as if he is still a student at brainy Haverford College, where he graduated in 1998. Schran's name was pinned on by the dinosaur's discoverer, the rugged, precise scholar Schran calls "Dr. Ken. " That would be Drexel paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara , whose team found fossil bones of the 65-ton creature in Argentina's barren Patagonia region, shipped them home to Philly, and put scholars to work decoding them in his top-floor lab at Papadakis Hall.
NEWS
September 6, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
It weighed as much as eight school buses. Its 37-foot neck looked like a section of oil pipeline. Its thigh bone alone was as big as a grown man. Say hello to Dreadnoughtus schrani . Drexel University scientists announced Thursday that they had unearthed the heaviest known dinosaur for which a weight can be accurately calculated. Someone call Jenny Craig. It's more than 65 tons. "Astoundingly huge," said Kenneth Lacovara, an associate professor of paleontology and geology at Drexel.
NEWS
August 13, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
THIS ONE GOES OUT to all the dinosaurs out there. And you know who you are, you musty mail carriers, you fusty farmers, you lumbering lumberjacks and yeah, you too, you neglected newspaper reporters. Or so says the labor studies that track the doomed in quickly disappearing jobs. It takes a dinosaur to know a dinosaur. So when this newspaper dino spotted an "old school" stenographer at a "new school" technology journalism conference last month, I got curious. And when I saw the rock-star reception Norma Miller and her fellow stenographers were getting at the conference put on by Knight-Mozilla's OpenNews project, I did what any terrestrial facing extinction would: I tracked her down in hopes of gleaning some survival tips.
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Call it "The Mystery of Oblong Blobs. " In the prevailing scientific view, they are microscopic remains of ancient pigment granules, offering clues to the colors of winged dinosaurs. But a new study by a Drexel University graduate proposes a different explanation - one that has ruffled a few academic feathers. Alison E. Moyer, now a Ph.D. student at North Carolina State University, says the cigar-shaped "microbodies," just one-millionth of a meter long, might simply be impressions left by very old bacteria.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Jim Henson's "Dinosaur Train Live: Buddy's Big Adventure" rolls through the Merriam Theater for its Philly debut on Saturday, bringing to life the characters of the popular PBS Kids series Dinosaur Train . Little Buddy, a Tyrannosaurus Rex, is a member of the Pteranodon family nest, but he's not sure what makes him belong to the family. He's also not sure what will happen when he grows into a big dinosaur and can no longer fit in the nest. To help him find answers, the Pteranodons take a trip on the Dinosaur Train, venturing across the Mesozoic to visit Buddy's friend King Cryolophosaurus.
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