CollectionsDinosaurs
IN THE NEWS

Dinosaurs

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 3, 1993 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
October is National Stamp Collection Month in many countries, and the special stamps issued for the occasion show that dinosaurs have captured the imagination of postal authorities as well as the interest of filmgoers to Jurassic Park. Australia, Canada and New Zealand all issued commemoratives last week depicting the prehistoric beasts. Special cancellations also are available in an effort to promote collecting interest in each country. Australia issued six stamps, each 45 cents, featuring dinosaurs that once roamed the continent.
NEWS
January 26, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JOHN COSTELLO
The skeleton of a fearsome Tyrannosaurus rex, part of the new, $2.5 million permanent exhibit at the Academy of Natural Sciences, captures the attention of onlookers. The exhibit, which features more than a dozen specimens of dinosaurs and other forms of prehistoric life, had its grand opening yesterday at the academy.
NEWS
February 2, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The scene, set in central Montana 70 million years ago, is straight out of a rock video: A bright purple Tyrannosaurus rex, king of the dinosaurs, races by at 35 miles per hour, waving a tail that is pink and yellow. A duckbilled dinosaur - bright yellow - struts by snorting, bellowing a cry somewhere between an oboe and a French horn. Welcome to the new, more colorful world of dinosaurs. This view of dinosaur mating season belongs to Robert Bakker, a Colorado scientist, whose provocative ideas about dinosaurs have helped shake up the world of paleontology, the study of fossils and prehistoric life, over the past decade.
NEWS
November 5, 1989 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Walking through the lush tropical setting of Longwood Gardens' fern room, visitors are surrounded by a jungle setting similar to the land where dinosaurs dwelled more than 60 million years ago. Vines grow from rain-forest plants that scrape the ceiling of the Kennett Square conservatory. A pteranodon sculpture hangs overhead as if in flight. Even the sounds of prehistoric times are recreated as replicas of parasaurolophus and triceratops move slowly among the plants and make deep, throaty sounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1987 | By Rathe Miller, Special to the Inquirer
Nancy Darmstadter holds the beast in her hands. Its fat neck tapers into a pointed snout, out of which a long, forked tongue continuously flickers. The African Savannah Monitor lizard is as ugly as a wart on the Wicked Witch of the West. But to the kids in this class, who eagerly take turns stroking its scaly head, its cuter than the Pillsbury Doughboy. The class is called "Dinosaurs in Action," and it is part of the Saturday Adventures series at the Academy of Natural Sciences.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1986 | By ROSE DeWOLF, Daily News Staff Writer
Thousands of people are about to discover that much of what they know about dinosaurs - or think they know - is wrong. For example, that all dinosaurs were enormous. For most people, the very word dinosaur calls up the image of a huge beast, as long as a football field, as tall as a hook-and-ladder. But the fact is that not all dinosaurs were giants. There were also smaller ones, some no bigger than a chicken. Or take the ever-popular view that cavemen used to club dinosaurs for dinner.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1988 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
From Connecticut to Maryland, Wawa Food Markets yesterday scrambled to remove up to 120,000 plastic dinosaur cups from its 400 stores. It's not because the cups are a health hazard. It's not because they've been recalled by the manufacturer. It's just that, well - somebody was taking legal action over them. The reptiles pictured on some of the plastic cups may have been drawn by someone other than the person whose name was printed beneath the sketch. The lizards had to go, Wawa officials decided.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2008 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Primeval, an exciting British sci-fi adventure series, takes place in that, um, primeval time and place where dinosaurs roam - the local shopping center. (Where they hunt down and viciously kill and eat unwary shoppers.) The dangerously addictive and entertaining show, which has its U.S. premiere tonight at 9 on BBC America, is a melange of sci-fi, mystery and comedy genres. It is the brainchild of Tim Haines, the writer and director behind the popular BBC nature docs Walking with Dinosaurs and Walking with Beasts, which show the life of those extinct giants through the magic of computer-generated imagery.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1991 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic The Hollywood Reporter contributed to this report
Hollywood is still talking about a recent in-house memorandum, written by Jeffrey Katzenberg, Disney production chief, and promptly leaked, that railed against runaway budgets and the blockbuster mentality. In addition, the buzzword around the studios these days is story-driven, an adjective to describe a movie that draws an audience with its narrative rather than with the magnetism of its stars. All of which serves as an odd climate for what may turn out to be the most expensive movie ever made.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2015 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's nice to think that if the dinosaurs had survived that comet (or meteor, or earthquake, or visit from the Rigelian Empire, or whatever did them in) and continued to coexist with us, we'd be pals. That's part of the appeal of Dinotopia , artist and author James Gurney's delightful series about a 19th-century explorer's visiting an island where gentle humans and smart dinos share an idyllic life. The other appealing aspect is Gurney's gorgeous, detailed paintings for the books.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 19, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, CULTURE WRITER
Pop culture muscles in on the offerings this fall at Philadelphia-area nonvisual museums. The world of Jurassic Park will take over the Franklin Institute with an exhibition featuring huge animatronic dinos - and pulsing rock will shake up the National Museum of American Jewish History when a show moves in exploring the life and influence of rock impresario Bill Graham. But pop will not take over everything. The Free Library will acknowledge the arrival of its new neighbor, the Mormon Temple, with an exhibition exploring early Mormon writing.
NEWS
August 21, 2016
Real (Bloodshot ***) Lydia Loveless records for an alt-country label, and she has a classic honky-tonk singer's stage name - she was born Lydia Ankrom. So it's no surprise the Ohio songwriter gets typecast as a country singer. But Real, the 25-year-old guitarist's fourth full-length album, moves her more confidently into the "genre-agnostic" artistic territory she's aiming for. Songs like the swoony "Longer" and chiming "More Than Ever" show the influence of heroes like Elvis Costello and Nick Lowe, and "Heaven" proudly brandishes an affection for gleaming '80s pop. Listen closely, however, and you'll hear that, beneath the inviting surface, Loveless retains a penchant for unvarnished emotionalism.
NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
A $500 million project that New Jersey environmental officials say would radically reduce the air pollution spewing from a South Jersey power plant has drawn only angry boos from environmental groups. The Department of Environmental Protection's recent issuance of a permit allowing the B.L. England electric generation plant in Cape May County to convert from coal-fired to gas-fired is "a sellout for clean air," the Sierra Club said last week. "Another nail in the coffin for the Christie administration's denial of carbon pollution," said Doug O'Malley, the director of Environment New Jersey, who called the plant a "fossil fuel dinosaur.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal, Staff Writer
In 1868, the Academy of Natural Sciences mounted the first-ever full dinosaur skeleton. A century and a half later, it's forcing the dinos out of extinction with state-of-the-art animatronics that mimic their actions, looks, and sounds from millions of years ago. "Back in 1868, no one had ever conceived of being able to see a skeleton of an animal like a dinosaur, and just to see the skeleton was a wonder of the world," said Ted Daeschler, the...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2016 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Aidan, 9, loves everything about dinosaurs and often wonders what the world would be like if they roamed the earth again. If he could take a trip anywhere, it would be to Alaska because there are huskies and wolves there. Aidan enjoys building objects with Legos, playing video games, and drawing. Because of his passion for dinosaurs, it is no surprise his favorite movies and video games are the Jurassic World series. In the third grade, Aidan does very well and his report card is filled with A's and B's. Science is his favorite subject, but he also enjoys art class and has a talent for drawing.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2016 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Wallace, who prefers to be called Wally, is passionate about dinosaurs. The 17-year-old spends many happy hours watching movies about them and reading a comic book series on them. He is proud of his collection of dinosaur figurines. Wally also enjoys reading about a variety of animals and sea life. Other favorite pastimes include fishing, going to the beach, watching and playing sports, dancing, and joking with his friends. His career goal is to work with animals, and he is considering becoming a veterinarian or an animal sitter.
NEWS
March 14, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Ever since a team led by Drexel University scientists found the bones of a dinosaur that weighed an estimated 65 tons, researchers have puzzled over how a creature that size got around. Big muscles, for sure. But the finer points of just how big, and where they were attached to the animal's massive bones, are unclear. Drexel students Kristyn Voegele and David McDevitt are trying to solve this ancient mystery with a modern tool: 3-D printing. For starters, they have made a one-tenth scale model of the animal's left foreleg, complete with motors and steel cables to simulate the muscles.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2015 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's nice to think that if the dinosaurs had survived that comet (or meteor, or earthquake, or visit from the Rigelian Empire, or whatever did them in) and continued to coexist with us, we'd be pals. That's part of the appeal of Dinotopia , artist and author James Gurney's delightful series about a 19th-century explorer's visiting an island where gentle humans and smart dinos share an idyllic life. The other appealing aspect is Gurney's gorgeous, detailed paintings for the books.
NEWS
November 8, 2015 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wait a minute . . . what? . . . Dark matter may have helped kill off the dinosaurs? Maybe. That theory is part of Lisa Randall's new book, Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs: The Astounding Interconnectedness of the Universe (Ecco, 432 pp., $29.99). Randall is the Frank B. Baird Jr. Professor of Science at Harvard University and a wonderful writer about science. She appears at the Free Library at 7:30 p.m. Monday. Dark matter is the intriguing but invisible matter that makes up as much as 85 percent of the universe.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
THE DINOSAURS of "Jurassic World" mauled a talking teddy bear at the box office this past weekend. Then again, so did an 11-year-old girl. Seth MacFarlane 's "Ted 2" opened far under expectations with $32.9 million, according to Rentrak estimates yesterday, ceding the top two spots to holdovers "Jurassic World" and "Inside Out. " "Jurassic" narrowly held the top spot for the third weekend in a row with a mighty $54.2 million, pushing it...
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|