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Diplomats

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NEWS
May 14, 1986
Secretary of State George P. Shultz is angry that Congress is cutting money to protect U.S. embassies abroad against terror and to aid deserving allies like the Philippines. Next time another embassy tragedy occurs, he railed, he'll place the blame at Congress' door. Those are fighting sentiments, but if Mr. Shultz really wants to protect U.S. diplomats he should direct his anger at the White House, where it belongs. Of course, budget cuts should not deny American diplomats adequate protection against growing terrorist threats abroad.
SPORTS
August 31, 1988 | By Diane Pucin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last season, for the first time in the five-year history of the Centennial Conference, a football team went undefeated in the seven conference games. That, says Swarthmore coach Fran Meagher, won't happen again. Franklin & Marshall, which went 9-1-1 overall, was the epitome of perfection in the conference. And despite Meagher's prediction, F & M could be better this year. Coach Tom Gilberg welcomes back nine starters, including senior wide receiver Dale Amos, who led the conference in receiving with 50 catches for 700 yards, both Centennial records.
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
Iran is holding contacts with visiting officials from Iraq, France, Algeria and Yemen to find ways to end the Gulf War, television and newspaper reports said. Today's Washington Post quoted a senior Iranian diplomat as saying the diplomatic activity provided a unique opportunity to see whether interested parties collectively could end the war. NBC, which also reported the visits, said the gathering had caught everyone "by surprise. " The Post identified those in Tehran as Iraq's deputy prime minister, Saadoun Hammadi; Algerian Foreign Minister Sid Ahmed Ghozali; French Foreign Ministry Secretary Gen. Francois Scheer; and a deputy foreign minister from Yemen.
SPORTS
December 5, 1991 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dave Wilding doesn't want to come off sounding too cocky, but Franklin and Marshall's center figured his team had to be the NCAA Division III basketball favorite. It just makes sense, said Wilding, a 6-foot-7 senior from Feasterville. The Diplomats were 28-3 in 1990-91, reached the national championship game, and have all their starters back, plus their top two reserves. "It was kind of a logical choice, looking back at the teams that made it to the Final Four," Wilding said.
NEWS
October 20, 1986 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Soviet Union yesterday ordered five U.S. diplomats to leave the country for "actions which are incompatible with their official status," diplomatic parlance that usually refers to spying. The action coincided with an American deadline for the departure of 25 diplomats at the Soviet U.N. mission who were ordered to leave the United States. The United States had accused them of using their U.N. positions for espionage. In Washington, Secretary of State George P. Shultz said the United States would retaliate for the expulsions ordered by Moscow.
NEWS
February 1, 1989 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer Susan Bennett of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
Afghan mujaheddin fighters have committed several bloody atrocities in recent months after taking control of government-held towns, according to Western diplomats. One was a slaughter so gruesome and premeditated that at least one Western government lodged an official protest with the mujaheddin group believed to be responsible, said the diplomats, in Afghanistan and New Delhi. In that case, the mujaheddin, who have been armed and supported by the United States for about a decade, shot and killed about 70 disarmed Afghan soldiers who surrendered to them in November at the border town of Torkham, on the Afghan side of the Khyber Pass.
NEWS
November 4, 1986 | By Jane Eisner, Inquirer Staff Writer
He was in Iran in 1981, Libya in 1984, and Lebanon last week, this imposing, 6 1/2-foot, bearded man who looks more like a Russian Orthodox patriarch than the Anglican missionary he is. He has been variously likened to Henry Kissinger, a boy scout and a ministering angel. It's difficult to pigeonhole Terry Waite - a layman working for the Anglican Church who willingly takes himself to some of the most dangerous places a Westerner can tread, a representative of no government who succeeds where professional diplomats have failed.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Iraq, apparently breaking a promise it had made to the United States, has stopped a group of American diplomats and their dependents from leaving the country, the State Department said yesterday. The department also acknowledged that Iraq had now defined the thousands of Americans and other foreigners trapped there and in Kuwait as "restrictees," who would be used as bargaining chips or shields until the conflict was over. Iraqi officials said last week that diplomats and their dependents could leave after a seven-day waiting period.
NEWS
July 31, 2011 | By Chris Brummitt, Associated Press
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - The Pakistani government has put new travel restrictions on American diplomats there, a U.S. official said Saturday, the latest sign of the breakdown in ties between Islamabad and Washington since the U.S. raid that killed Osama bin Laden. Pakistan reacted furiously to the May 2 raid deep within its borders because the mission was carried out with no warning to authorities. The fallout has battered an already frayed relationship seen as key to the fight against al-Qaeda and Washington's hopes of reaching a settlement in Afghanistan and withdrawing troops.
NEWS
September 23, 2011 | By Edith M. Lederer, Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS - American diplomats led a walkout Thursday at the General Assembly as Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad fiercely attacked the United States and major Western European nations as "arrogant powers" ruled by greed and eager for military adventurism. The two U.S. diplomats, who specialize in the Middle East, were followed out of the chamber by diplomats from more than 30 countries. They included the 27 European Union members, Australia, New Zealand, Somalia, Liechtenstein, Monaco, San Marino, and Macedonia, a U.N. diplomat said.
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NEWS
September 17, 2016
John Buzbee, 50, a veteran Foreign Service officer who served across the Middle East, including two stints in Iraq after the 2003 U.S. invasion, died Thursday from complications from metastatic colon cancer. Mr. Buzbee served in Iraq during the effort to rebuild that nation after the ouster of Saddam Hussein. He started his career as a newspaper reporter in Los Angeles and Kansas City, covering police and city hall. But a longtime fascination with the Middle East prompted him to change careers in his early 30s. After earning a degree in Arab Studies and studying Arabic at Georgetown University, he joined the U.S. Foreign Service, working in American embassies and consulates throughout the Middle East and in the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs at the State Department in Washington over the next 16 turbulent years.
NEWS
April 7, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Maybe the Democrats are the party of working people, said Richard Trumka, leader of the nation's largest federation, the AFL-CIO. But "look how easy it has been for Donald Trump to tap into the justifiable anger" of Americans living paycheck to paycheck, unable to cover a $500 car repair, he told 700 Pennsylvania labor leaders Tuesday at the Pennsylvania AFL-CIO's convention in Philadelphia. "But we can't be fooled," he added. "Trump isn't interested in solving our problems. " And so it began Tuesday, three weeks from Pennsylvania's primary, as the state's top union leaders exhorted each other - with help from Trumka - to double down on their efforts to elect politicians who "create an economy that works for everybody," he said.
NEWS
February 23, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
It felt like now or never to Jesus Galano Sollet. The 50-year-old fisherman had long harbored a plan to flee Cuba for America. But in December 2014, when President Obama and Raul Castro announced the first diplomatic breakthrough between the two nations in 50 years, Sollet decided he had to make his move, and fast. Rumors were stirring on the island that the priority treatment the United States has given undocumented Cuban immigrants since the 1960s - a welcoming embrace extended to no other nationality - could end with the onset of normalized relations.
NEWS
September 21, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Any pope who travels from Havana to the United States on a mission to persuade Congress to uplift the poor and address global warming has to be pretty audacious. So on his coming trip, Pope Francis will no doubt spark speculation about his potential for diplomatic miracles. The Vatican is no stranger, of course, to high-level diplomacy or dialogue with communist leaders (although dealing with the current crop of U.S. legislators may be tougher). Yet it is especially fascinating to watch Pope Francis' energetic efforts to address international crises ranging from refugee flows to violence in the Mideast and Ukraine to global inequality.
SPORTS
March 23, 2015 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
EDMONTON - Steve Mason fell on the sword again. One day after he was embarrassed in front of 19,289 in Calgary and a few hundred thousand more watching on television for being pulled after allowing a goal he couldn't even see, the Flyers goalie answered questions with diplomacy that could make him a fine Canadian ambassador after hockey. "I don't take it that way," Mason said, when asked if his yanking was a personal shot. "As a professional, you've got to take things with a grain of salt sometimes and work hard.
NEWS
October 7, 2014 | The Inquirer Staff
Holding a 10-stroke lead heading into the final round, the Kutztown women's golf team held off West Chester on Sunday to win its Fall Invite by 1 stroke at Berkleigh Golf Club. Hope Giordano (Council Rock South) won her first tournament as a Golden Bear. She carded an 80 for a two-day total of 159, finishing 5 strokes ahead of the Golden Rams' Lacey Bensing. Women's Soccer La Salle 3, VCU 1 - Kelsey Haycook netted a pair of goals in the first half before Anna Dolhansky (Triton)
SPORTS
July 25, 2013 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
THE PHRASE "by any means necessary" carried an implied threat when Malcolm X used it nearly 50 years ago. Through peaceful means or through violence, Malcolm intended to win the battle for human rights and dignity. Same phrase, very different context yesterday. Michael Vick was asked what happens if he doesn't win the competition to become the Eagles' starting quarterback, a post he has held since 2010. It's easy to speculate that Vick and the team might be more comfortable with Vick shipped elsewhere, rather than having him pace the sideline at age 33 while Nick Foles or Matt Barkley plays.
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By Matea Gold, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - A trio of money men who helped President Obama bring in record donations for his reelection last year were tapped Friday for highly sought diplomatic assignments in Europe. John Emerson, a Los Angeles investment management executive who cochaired the campaign's Southern California finance team, will be nominated as the next U.S. ambassador to Germany. HBO executive James Costos, who helped raise more than $500,000 for Obama's reelection, is in line to be the ambassador to Spain.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Hamza Hendawi, Associated Press
CAIRO - Egypt's Islamist president announced Saturday that he was cutting off diplomatic relations with Syria and closing Damascus' embassy in Cairo amid growing calls from hard-line Sunni clerics in Egypt and elsewhere to launch a "holy war" against Syria's embattled regime. Mohammed Morsi told thousands of supporters at a rally in Cairo that his government was also withdrawing the Egyptian charge d'affaires from Damascus. He called on Lebanon's Hezbollah to leave Syria, where the Iranian-backed Shiite militant group has been fighting alongside troops loyal to embattled President Bashar al-Assad against the mostly Sunni rebels.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Philip Elliott, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The seasoned diplomat who penned a highly critical report on security at a U.S. outpost in Benghazi, Libya, defended his scathing assessment but absolved then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. "We knew where the responsibility rested," Thomas Pickering, whose career spans four decades, said Sunday. "They've tried to point a finger at people more senior than where we found the decisions were made," Pickering said of Clinton's critics. The Accountability and Review Board, which Pickering headed with retired Adm. Mike Mullen, the former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, did not question Clinton at length about the attacks but concluded the decisions about the consulate were made well below the secretary's level.
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